News & Events

Randolph EMC Wraps Up Outages from Matthew, Assists Other Co-ops
October 10, 2016

October 10, 2016 (Asheboro, N.C.) — After Hurricane Matthew caused widespread damage and outages across much of Randolph Electric Membership Corporation’s service territory, linemen were able to restore all major outages by mid-day Sunday, and only a few scattered outages remained Sunday afternoon. Around one-third of the cooperative’s total membership — 9,470 members — lost electricity at various times as a result of the storm. The number of members affected in each county are as follows:

Randolph: 1,560

Moore: 4,181

Montgomery: 2,492

Chatham: 1,224

Alamance: 13

Matthew’s heavy rains quickly saturated the ground, weakening trees’ root systems. When coupled with the storm’s high winds, many large trees fell onto power lines, which snapped poles and left many power lines on the ground in some cases. 

Line personnel from Randolph Electric and contract crews from Branching Out Tree Service, Lee Electrical Construction, Lewis Tree Service, and Pike Electric worked steadily Saturday and Sunday to repair 12 broken poles and multiple spans of downed wire.

“All the linemen worked diligently in very windy, wet conditions to restore power as safely and quickly as possible for our members,” said Dale Lambert, chief executive officer of Randolph EMC. “I appreciate each and every employee who had a part in any way in the restoration efforts. And I want to say thank you to our members for their understanding and many kind, encouraging words over the course of the storm.”

On Monday, Randolph Electric sent a total of 61 cooperative and contractor line technicians to Pee Dee Electric, based out of Wadesboro, to assist in their restoration efforts. Following completion there, crews will move on to help other cooperatives still in the process of rebuilding their distribution systems.

“We’re fortunate that our system was not as heavily damaged as many of our neighboring co-ops and those located farther east,” said Jay Albright, REMC’s district vice president. “Second only to the safety our employees and members, getting the lights back on is the main priority after a storm no matter where you are. That’s why we’re going to do whatever we can to help get the lights back on for all North Carolina co-op members,” he added.

Randolph EMC’s linemen staying behind remain ready to respond to any outages reported in their home territory. Members who receive electricity from Randolph Electric Membership Corp. should report power interruptions by calling 1-877-736-2633. 

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation 
Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,500 electric consumers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties. 


 

Significant Progress on Outage Restoration Overnight
October 9, 2016

October 9, 2016, 7:00 a.m. Update (Asheboro, N.C.)— Randolph Electric Membership Corporation crews made significant progress overnight and continue work restoring outages resulting from Hurricane Matthew. As of 7:00 a.m., approximately 225 Randolph EMC members are without power. Most of the remaining outages are located in Randolph and Moore Counties.

Line crews worked steadily to repair multiple broken poles and downed power lines from fallen trees, tree limbs and other debris. A total of 8,780 members have been affected by outages so far.

“REMC’s line crews and the contract crews from Lee Electrical Construction, Lewis Tree Service and Pike Electric who have assisted us have done a phenomenal job working through the night in the wind and rain to restore power to our members,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations for REMC. “We’re not necessarily out of the woods, yet, though,” he added.

“The heavy rain that came with this storm has left us with extremely saturated soil, which makes trees more susceptible to falling, especially if they have weak root systems. Our area is also expected to see more high winds today with gusts up to 35 mph, so it’s possible that REMC members could experience additional outages as a result. We’re prepared to keep the response effort going for as long as we’re needed,” Mabe said.

Cooperative members are thanked for their patience, and are reminded to only use generators and charcoal grills in well-ventilated areas; a garage does not count as a well-ventilated area. Never touch a downed power line, and remember that sometimes debris can cover fallen lines, making them difficult to spot.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph EMC and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. The cooperative also posts updates on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Nearing Completion of Outage Restoration
October 9, 2016

October 9, 2016, 4:00 p.m. Update (Asheboro, N.C.)— As of 4:00 p.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corporation line personnel are working to restore power to just two members. REMC and contract line crews worked steadily to repair multiple broken poles and downed power lines from fallen trees, tree limbs and other debris. In all, nearly 9,450 Randolph EMC members were affected by outages resulting from Hurricane Matthew’s wind damage.

The forecast for REMC’s area calls for additional wind throughout Sunday, which could cause more outages. Central North Carolina received excessive rainfall, heavily saturating the ground, which can weaken trees’ root systems and cause them to fall onto power lines. Members who experience power interruptions should report them to 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Cooperative staff and line crews remain prepared to respond to any additional outage situations.

“We really appreciate our members’ patience as crews worked through the storm to restore outages as safely and quickly as possible,” said REMC’s Chief Executive Officer Dale Lambert. “When our line personnel have gotten adequate rest and we’ve determined we can spare them, some of our employees and contractors will be sent to assist in power restoration efforts in the eastern part of the state. Those areas have suffered far worse damage than Randolph EMC, and it is part of our cooperative value system to help a sister cooperative in need,” he added.


 

Hurricane Matthew Outage Response
October 8, 2016

October 8, 2016 (Asheboro, N.C.)— Crews from Randolph Electric Membership Corporation have worked throughout the day restoring outages resulting from wind associated with Hurricane Matthew. Nearly 6,450 members scattered across REMC’s service territory have experienced power outages today. Most outages have been caused by trees and tree limbs and debris falling on distribution lines; however, a Duke Energy transmission line outage affected approximately 4,000 members in the Robbins and Bear Creek areas just before noon. As of 3:30 p.m., crews are restoring power to approximately 1,900 Randolph EMC members.

Cooperative staff will continue to monitor weather conditions and are available to respond to member needs. In addition, crews will continue restoration efforts until all electricity has been restored.

Because of the amount of rain that has fallen recently, heavily saturated soil makes trees more susceptible to falling, especially if they have weak root systems. This saturation, combined with high winds, increase chances of trees or tree limbs falling on power lines and causing outages. As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph EMC and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. The cooperative also posts updates on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Continues Restoration Efforts
October 8, 2016

8:15 p.m. Update (Asheboro, N.C.)—Crews from Randolph Electric Membership Corporation worked steadily throughout the day Saturday restoring outages to nearly 7,250 members as a result of wind damage from Hurricane Matthew. Linemen reported several broken poles and downed lines from fallen trees, tree limbs and other debris. As of 8:15 p.m., approximately 2,300 Randolph EMC members remain without power.

Outages were scattered across most of Randolph EMC’s service territory, though they were most concentrated in heavily wooded areas of Montgomery and Moore Counties. Cooperative staff remain on alert for additional outages and REMC and contract crews will continue restoration efforts through the night until all electricity has been restored. As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph EMC and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. The cooperative also posts updates on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC STANDING BY AS MATTHEW MOVES NORTH
October 7, 2016

Randolph EMC is monitoring conditions and prepared to respond if power outages occur as Hurricane Matthew moves north. REMC line crews are positioned and ready to respond to outages immediately. Should co-ops in areas more severely impacted by the hurricane need assistance, a selection of REMC linemen are positioned to assist in restoration efforts as soon as Randolph Electric’s territory is cleared of being affected by the weather.

Although Hurricane Matthew is forecasted to stay offshore, a significant portion of southeastern North Carolina could experience heavy rain and gusty winds. The ground in this area is already saturated from rain and flooding last week, creating prime conditions for toppling trees that could bring down power lines as Matthew moves closer.
 
If your electric service is provided by Randolph EMC, report all power outages to REMC’s automated outage reporting hotline at 1-877-736-2633 (1-877-REMC-OFF) for the quickest response to your outage. Members are encouraged to charge their cell phones and prepare an emergency kit ahead of the storm. REMC staff will post the latest weather, safety and outage updates on the REMC website, Facebook and Twitter pages.
 
If you encounter a fallen, sparking or sagging power line, do not touch it. Always assume that powerlines are energized and dangerous. Stay away from flooded areas. If you see cooperative crews working on the side of the road, slow down and leave plenty of space. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work, their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.


 

Sept. 23 Deadline Approaching for Bright Ideas Grants!
August 29, 2016

Time is running out for teachers to apply for Bright Ideas grants of up to $2,000 from Randolph Electric Bright Ideas education grant program! Educators with creative ideas for hands-on classroom projects are encouraged to fill out and submit an application by September 23rd. Interested teachers can find the application, grant-writing tips, and more information on the Bright Ideas website at www.ncbrightideas.com.

“Since 1994, well over 2 million students statewide have benefited from $10.2 million in grant funding for 9,800 projects,” said Kathleen Duckworth, Communications and Outreach Specialist. “As a cooperative, supporting our local communities is at the heart of what we do. We believe there’s no better way to give back than by investing in the education of our youth.”

A total of $12,000 in grants for the 2016-2017 school year will be awarded in November for projects in all grade levels and all disciplines, including math, science, language, art, English and history.

The Bright Ideas grant application requires an outline of the proposed project, a detailed budget and a description of the benefit to students. Applicants are encouraged to highlight the innovative, creative elements of the project and to proofread carefully.

For additional questions, please contact Kathleen Duckworth at 336-625-5177 or Kathleen.Duckworth@RandolphEMC.com.


 

People Helping People Announces 2016 Community Grant Winners
July 15, 2016

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation’s People Helping People (PHP) Program recently awarded $10,000 to 6 local non-profit agencies as part of a special Community Grants program. Funding for the awards was made possible by money that PHP received from national cooperative lender Co-Bank’s Sharing Success matching grant program.

Registered 501(c)(3) organizations in Alamance, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Randolph counties were eligible to apply for funding up to $2,000 to implement programs or purchase needed equipment to facilitate a program, which would help make a positive impact in the communities where Randolph EMC member-owners reside.

“All grant applications were carefully reviewed by the People Helping People Board, noted Uretha Smith, President of People Helping People Board of Directors. “It’s amazing how many great projects our local non-profits are working on and we are honored to have the opportunity to help make a positive impact in our home communities,” she added.

“We are extremely grateful to have the grant from Co-Bank again this year, which will help ensure we are able to continue to support our community. We are proud to award these grants and know our support will impact many families, friends and members of the communities that we serve,” Smith said.

People Helping People enables members to “round up” their monthly electric bills to the nearest dollar. The extra change goes into the People Helping People account, which is used to provide financial support to individuals and organizations within the five counties served by Randolph EMC. In 2015 alone, People Helping People supported 88 Randolph EMC members totaling $11,825 in donations.

This is the third year that People Helping People has received funding from Co-Bank’s Sharing Success matching grant program. In previous years, grants were used to build up the organization’s reserves; however, this year’s $5,000 grant, combined with Randolph EMC’s matching $5,000 donation, was earmarked to help non-profit agencies with high-impact projects.  

The six 2016 grants awarded through People Helping People are:

$1,000: Adventures Beyond Classrooms (ABC)– In conjunction with Communities in Schools, ABC will use the awarded grant funds to help pay for class field trips for student’s whose families can’t afford to pay for those trips.

$2,000: Prancing Horse Foundation – Funding will support therapeutic riding programs that provides services to special needs children and adults in Moore County.

$2,000: Randolph County Partnership for Children – Money will be used to support the Reach Out and Read program. During their first well-child visit, every child between the ages of six months and five years will receive a new, developmentally-appropriate children’s book to take home and keep. Reach Out and Read promotes early literacy and school readiness.

$2,000: Randolph-Asheboro YMCA – Funding from this grant will be used to help bridge the achievement gap by enhancing the literacy of the children they serve, through the purchasing of reading materials to use in summer and after-school tutoring programs.

$2,000: Randolph County Safe Kids – Money received will aid in the purchasing of new child safety items for programming purposes.

$1,000: Friends of Weymouth – AIMS (Authors in Moore Schools) – Each school year, AIMS arranges visits by national bestselling authors and illustrators to each K-5 Elementary Schools in Moore County. This grant will fund free, personalized and autographed books to each student at Robbins Elementary, following an author event this school year. 


 

Storms Cause Overnight Outages for REMC
July 9, 2016

July 9, 2016 (Asheboro, NC)—Randolph Electric Membership Corporation experienced a line of thunder storms containing blustery wind, lightning and heavy rain early Friday, July 8, 2016 around 8:30 p.m. in the wake of a passing storm front across central North Carolina.  Sustained high winds associated with the storms created scattered power outages throughout the evening. Outages were primarily due to broken tree limbs, uprooted trees and flying debris. 

The Randolph EMC Dispatch Center reports the number of outages at the height of the storm to total around 2,500. By midnight the number of members out of power had been reduced to just over 500. REMC employees worked through the night to repair damage and restore power.  Senior Process Engineer, Marty Hinson reported, “Although the storm front did not last very long it was intense and created scattered outages cross the REMC system.” By 2:30 a.m. the number of individual outages had been reduced to 11, affecting less than 300 members. “The last few outages usually take some time to restore because each outage consists of just a few affected services and REMC line crews must check every line for safety before restoring power," said Linda Poole, GIS Supervisor.     
 
We anticipate as the day progresses, there may be members who have failed to report power problems or storm related damage to power lines. If your electric service is provided by Randolph EMC and you are experiencing a power problem or outage, please report it to 1-877-736-2633.
 
As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.  Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work, their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident. 


 

It's Bright Ideas Time at REMC
April 1, 2016

 It’s April, and here at Randolph Electric, that means one thing: the beginning of a new season of Bright Ideas education grants! The Bright Ideas grant program is offered by all 26 of North Carolina’s electric cooperatives and supports educators in need of funding to implement creative, hands-on learning projects in their classrooms.

Since 1994, North Carolina’s electric co-ops have awarded more than $10.2 million in Bright Ideas grants to teachers statewide. More than 9,800 classroom projects benefiting well over 2 million North Carolina students have been made possible because of these grants.

Randolph Electric is now accepting applications for Bright Ideas education grants for the 2016-17 school year. Teachers in K-12 classrooms with innovative ideas for hands-on learning projects are encouraged to apply for a grant up to $2,000, totaling $12,000. Last year, Randolph Electric awarded a total of $10,000 to eleven projects that will touch the lives of more than 1,500 local students.

Grant applications will be accepted April 1 through September 23rd. However, it could pay to apply early: All teachers who submit their applications by the early bird deadline of Aug. 15 will be entered into a drawing for a Visa gift card.

To apply, teachers must include a budget, explain the implementation, goals, creative elements and evaluation of the project, and have approval from the school principal. Applications will be judged in a competitive evaluation process, and judges will be on the lookout for projects that feature innovation and creativity. The application and grant-writing tips can be found at www.ncbrightideas.com


 

Sports Camp Scholarships for Middle School Students
March 23, 2016

Sports Camp time! Randolph Electric is now accepting applications from middle-school students for all-expense paid scholarships to summer basketball camps at the University of North Carolina and N.C. State University. Young men can apply to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp in Chapel Hill, and young women can vie for a spot at the Wolfpack Women’s Basketball Camp in Raleigh.

Students can download an application at www.ncelectriccooperatives.com. Randolph EMC will select one student for each camp in a competitive process based on academics, extra-curricular activities and a short essay. Rising sixth through eighth graders are eligible to apply, and the final application deadline is March 31, 2016.


 

9 a.m. Update: REMC Crews Continue Outage Response
February 25, 2016

Asheboro, N.C., February 25, 2016, 9:00 a.m.—Randolph Electric Membership Corporation crews continue work this morning after working overnight to restore power outages resulting from strong winds.

As of 9 a.m. Thursday, REMC has just two outages affecting four members in Montgomery County and one member in the Parks Crossroads area of Randolph County.

Including the outages reported overnight and this morning, the cooperative recorded 66 system-wide outages, affecting approximately 4,800 members. Additional outages may occur as wind is predicted for our area throughout the day.

Members who receive electric service from Randolph EMC should report outages by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633).


 

REMC Crews Responding to Wind-Related Outages
February 24, 2016

February 24, 2016 (Asheboro, N.C.)—As of 6:00 p.m. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is working to restore multiple scattered outages affecting approximately 1,100 members. Strong, gusty winds swept through the cooperative’s five-county service territory Wednesday afternoon, resulting in outages caused by downed trees and scattered debris, as well as broken poles in some locations.

Line crews are responding to outages at this time and are working as quickly and safely as possible to restore power. Employees and crews will remain on alert throughout the night to respond to any additional power outages that occur as a result of continuing high winds.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph Electric Membership Corporation and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.   


 

11 pm Update: REMC Crews Continue Outage Response
February 24, 2016

Asheboro, N.C., February 24, 2016, 11:00 p.m.—Randolph Electric Membership Corporation crews are continuing to work tonight to restore power outages resulting from Wednesday’s severe thunderstorms. 

REMC has recorded 55 outages system-wide so far, affecting 2,691 members. As of 11:00 p.m., the cooperative is reporting 11 outages affecting around 300 members scattered across Randolph, Moore and Chatham Counties.

Most outages were caused by heavy wind bringing down trees and tree limbs on power lines. The cooperative system sustained seven broken poles, with two of them being on substation feeder lines. 

“We appreciate our members’ patience as crews work to restore power overnight,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “With high winds expected to continue overnight, it is very likely that more outages will occur. We want our members to know that REMC employees and crews are on alert and ready to respond to all reported outages around the clock,” he added.

Members who receive electric service from Randolph EMC should report them by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). The cooperative urges members to remember that safety is top priority. If an individual encounters a downed power line, he or she should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and a distraction could cause an accident.


 
Sports Camp Scholarships for Middle School Students
February 1, 2016

Randolph Electric is now accepting applications from middle-school students for all-expense paid scholarships to summer basketball camps at the University of North Carolina and N.C. State University. Young men can apply to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp in Chapel Hill, and young women can vie for a spot at the Wolfpack Women’s Basketball Camp in Raleigh.

Students can download an application at www.ncelectriccooperatives.com. Randolph EMC will select one student for each camp in a competitive process based on academics, extra-curricular activities and a short essay. Rising sixth through eighth graders are eligible to apply, and the final application deadline is March 31, 2016.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship program, sponsored by Randolph EMC and the state’s 26 electric cooperatives, sends more than 50 students statewide to learn from renowned collegiate coaches and athletes each year. Both camps will work closely with students to develop fundamental skills that will help the young athletes excel both on and off the court.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camps program provides a unique educational and athletic opportunity for outstanding students across our state and is yet another way the cooperatives are demonstrating their commitment to North Carolina communities.

For more information, please contact Lauren Ingold at 336-625-5177 ext. 2338 or at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

REMC Reports Minimal Impact from Winter Storm
January 23, 2016

January 23, 2016 (Asheboro, N.C.)— Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is reporting no outages as of 10:30 a.m., and experienced just two weather-related outages overnight, affecting 150 members in Moore County. The cooperative will continue to monitor weather conditions and will remain on alert to respond to any outages that should occur throughout the weekend. 

As a safety reminder, Randolph EMC urges the public not to travel if at all possible, as roads are still treacherous and the risk for sliding off the road and hitting a utility pole is increased. In addition, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

Members experiencing a power problem or outage should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) for the fastest response. Members may view outage progress at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Reports No Outages from Winter Storm
January 22, 2016

 As of 5 p.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is reporting no weather-related outages for its service territory related to winter storm Jonas.

“Luckily most of the precipitation in our service territory that has fallen has been sleet and not freezing rain,” notes Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. “While accumulations of sleet can make roads treacherous, sleet does not accumulate to weigh down trees and power lines, greatly reducing the threat for tree damage and power outages.” 

REMC is aware this situation may quickly change and has extra line technician crews and staff on stand-by, ready to respond quickly to any outages that might occur.

“Additional crews will be on alert in both our Asheboro and Robbins districts to minimize outage times if we do start to experience issues on the system,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “We understand the inconvenience of a power outage at any time, but with the uncertainty of the weather, it's important that our members know that we’re ready to respond at any time of the day or night,” he added.

Members experiencing a power problem or outage should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) for the fastest response. Members may view outage progress at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.   


 

REMC Preparing for Winter Storm Jonas
January 21, 2016

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring the threat for potential winter weather in our service areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties. With the possibility of heavy ice and snow over the next few days, the cooperative has activated its storm response plan and has coordinated with material suppliers and other co-ops and contract crews to secure additional resources to respond to widespread outages that may result from Winter Storm Jonas.

Randolph EMC encourages members to take precautions now to ensure that you and your family stay warm and safe if there are outages. The American Red Cross recommends making an emergency preparedness kit that includes water, nonperishable food, flashlights, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra batteries, medicines and a first aid kit. It is also a good idea to charge cell phones, tablets or laptops now.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should report all outages by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

For updates on power outages, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Announces Bright Ideas Educational Grant Winners for 2015-16
November 3, 2015

Congratulations to Randolph EMC’s Bright Ideas grant winners! Bright Ideas education grants, sponsored by Randolph Electric and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives, provide resources to educators for innovative, hands-on, classroom projects up to $2,000 that would not otherwise be funded. This year, Randolph Electric awarded a total of $10,000 to eleven projects that will touch the lives of more than 1,500 local students.

A panel of retired educators carefully reviewed and discussed each application before deciding on the following final awards. This year’s judges were: Linda Donnell, Moore County Schools; Robin Hussey, Randolph County Schools; Caroline Kemp, Asheboro City Schools; and Sandra Tedder, Montgomery County Schools.

“We’re thrilled to award these dedicated educators with Bright Ideas grants,” said Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at Randolph Electric. “Their creative and innovative projects will no doubt help students reach their full potential and spark higher interest in learning for years to come.”

Grants Awarded:

  • Charlotte T. Burgess, Randleman Middle School – $559.20 Homework Can be Fun...and Educational! Grant funding will purchase Storyworks Magazines for 6th grade students to use for homework and class work. The magazines incorporate interesting topics of all genres, allowing the students to develop and utilize their reading strategies by being able to write in the magazines.
  • Mrs. Karen C. Buhrman, Agape Christian Academy - $1,700 for The Bee Cause: The Bee Cause is a national non-profit program aiming to put observation honey bee hives in 1,000 schools. Students from Agape will work with local high school students and the NC Zoo, as well as the local soup kitchen to educate others about the important benefit to the pollination of the vegetation in our ecosystem.
  • Mrs. Donna Cabiness, Donna Lee Loflin Elementary School – $900 for School Counselor Book Collection for Student Check-outs: Funding to purchase character education books and a book cart for a School Counselor Book Collection for students to read during their independent reading time at school. These book will help students enhance their character, solve conflicts with friends, identify and address bullying situations, and develop social skills.
  • Mrs. Andrea Isley, Franklinville/Liberty Elementary School - $900 for How Fast Can My Heart Beat: Students in grades 3-5 will utilize heart rate monitors in physical education classes to learn health, science and math. By monitoring their heart rate and learning the importance of health and wellness, students can lead heathier and more active lifestyles—impacting them inside and outside the classroom.
  • Mr. Bradley Kidd, North Moore High School- $1680.80 for North Moore Hydroponic Laboratory: The North Moore High School Agriculture Department aims to transform an old coal room in the school building into an indoor growing area to produce food and educate students about growing with hydroponic systems while utilizing artificial light.                                        
  • Mrs. Laura King, McCrary Elementary School – $500 for North Carolina Science Olympiad Club: Students will be able participate in the North Carolina Science Olympiad program, providing them with hands-on, interactive, inquiry-based events. The goal of this program is to interest students in future degrees and careers in North Carolina involving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
  • Mrs. Marchelle Knight, Asheboro High School – $300 for Novels for Graphic Learning: Newly immigrated English Language Learners will receive novels so they can participate in digital book clubs, research, and social justice projects to be shared with other students and improve their English skills. 
  • Mrs. Pachovia Lovett, Randleman Elementary School - $1,420 for RES Book Wars: RES Book Wars is a literacy program aimed at promoting reading and reading comprehension through competitive quiz games and parental engagement. Students will meet weekly to discuss their reading assignments and earn points to redeem for educational prizes at the end of the program. 
  • Mrs. Anita Mashburn, Green Ridge Elementary School – $756 for Book Bunch and Lunch: This project will allow children to read great literature that has themes, plots and characters that portray life situations that are similar to what the students experience each day. Some examples of topics include overcoming adversity, bullying, anxiety, self-esteem, diversity, homelessness, living in poverty and friendship.
  • Ms. Jocelyn Remington, The Academy of Moore County – $930 for Integrating Solar Energy into Elementary School Life: Solar panels will be purchased and placed on the roof of the school building to help teach the scientific method and create hypotheses. Students will perform experiments and learn the importance of renewable energy sources such as solar energy.
  • Mrs. Susan L. Rodriguez, West Pine Middle School – $354 for Robotics Club: Funding will purchase an EV3 robot to help students in the Robotics Club. The program allows middle school aged students to learn more about the benefits of science, math and technology and encourage their love of learning. 


A flagship co-op community initiative, the Bright Ideas program provides grants directly to teachers to fund innovative learning projects not covered by traditional school financing. Since 1994, N.C. teachers have won more than $9.6 million for 9,200 projects, and more than 1.8 million students have participated in Bright Ideas-funded projects in all subjects including math, reading, science, technology, engineering, music and the arts.


 

REMC Encourages Members to Make Preparations for Hurriance Joaquin
October 1, 2015

Although the path of Hurricane Joaquin is still unknown, we do know that the ground is already heavily saturated. With several more inches of rain predicted, it won't take much wind to cause trees to fall into power lines, resulting in outages.

Our team already has storm and outage preparations in place, and we encourage our members to prepare for any outages that may occur in the coming days, as well. Here are some tips to get you started: http://www.randolphemc.com/content/be-prepared.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

Members experiencing a power problem or outage should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) for the fastest response.


 

2016 Youth Tour Applications Now Available
September 10, 2015

What adventures will you experience in 2016? REMC will send one student to Washington, D.C. next summer for an-all-expense paid trip the week of June 11-17, 2016. To be eligible, a student must be a current sophomore or junior in high school. While in Washington, D.C., the REMC delegate joins other electric cooperative representatives from throughout the United States for a week of fun and learning. Here is a glance of what experiences students participate in during Youth Tour:

  • Participate in Youth Day, where students learn more about America's electric cooperatives;
  • Lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington Cemetery;
  • Visit Capitol Hill and meet with our North Carolina Senators and Congressmen;
  • Visit the sites of Washington, D.C. including the monuments;
  • Visit the Smithsonian museums
  • Take a boat trip down the Potomac River
  • Visit the Newseum
  • Visit the Holocaust Museum
  • Attend an All States Dance

Completed applications are due by December 8th, 2015. For additional questions, please contact Lauren Ingold at 336-625-5177 ext. 2338 or at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

Power Line Safety
August 27, 2015

Fall officially begins September 23rd and the cooler temperatures typically give way to lots of home improvement projects. Some of your projects might be around the yard. Landscaping is one of the best and most affordable ways to give your home’s exterior a fresh look, but there’s one thing many people don’t consider before they start their landscaping projects – power lines. Before you grab your gardening gear, familiarize yourself with this list of power line safety tips:

  • Do not attempt to trim trees near power lines. Randolph EMC has an extensive right-of-way clearing program that ensures trees aren’t too close to power lines, but if you happen to see any that may look too close, call your electric cooperative to send out the experts.
  • If you have plans to build a tree house for your kids, be extremely cautious. Steer clear of all power lines to keep yourself and your children out of danger.
  • Remember, ladders are conductors of electricity. It’s best to carry a ladder horizontally so that it doesn’t inadvertently touch a power line, and always pay attention to where you set up the ladder.
  • Call 811 before you dig, even if it’s just to plant a tree or shrub, to identify where underground utility lines are buried. Digging around lines can cause serious injury or even death, as well as electrical outages. For more information regarding N.C. 811, please visit www.nc811.org.  
  • The Electrical Safety Foundation International (EFSI) reminds you to “Look up! Look Down! Look Out!” This motto is especially important if your field of work requires you to be in the vicinity of power lines because contact with power lines can be deadly.

Remember, electricity looks for the shortest, most direct path to ground. A ladder, pole or even a wet kite string touching a power line will give electricity a new, shorter path to ground. If you are holding one of these items, you could become a part of that path.  Those consequences could be deadly, so please exercise caution when you’re around power lines. Call our office if you have any questions about power line safety.  


 

More Secure Bill Site Requires Updated Browser Use
August 27, 2015

On August 27, a major update was applied to Randolph EMC’s billing system, which strengthened the security requirements for browsers to help keep our members’ data safe.

As a result, REMC’s online Member Service Portal now requires that members use more recent versions of web browsers than before. Please make sure your browser meets the following minimum requirements before logging on to the Member Service Portal to access your account:

  • Internet Explorer – minimum Version 10 and 11
  • Chrome – Versions greater than 39
  • Firefox – Versions greater than 34
  • Apple Safari – Versions greater than 7

If you have any questions regarding this change, please call us at (800) 672-8212 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


 

ecobee3 Thermostat Pilot Project Empowers Members with “Smart” Energy
August 21, 2015

Randolph EMC is piloting a buzz-worthy program that puts a sleek, energy-saving tool in the homes of its members-owners, and also facilitates the study of a new strategy for peak load reduction.

Randolph EMC is offering discounted ecobee3 smart thermostats to member-owners interested in gaining greater control over their energy use. The Wi-Fi-connected thermostat allows members to control their thermostat remotely from a smart phone or computer, access real-time energy consumption information, and save money by improving energy efficiency.

To participate in the pilot study, members must have a compatible HVAC system and functioning wireless home network system. Participants agree to make their connected thermostats available for temperature adjustments during times of peak electricity use.

According to the manufacturer, the ecobee3 smart thermostat can save homeowners up to an average of 23 percent annually. “As a not-for-profit cooperative, Randolph Electric has a goal to help members manage their energy use and to provide electricity at the lowest possible cost,” said Fred Smith, vice president of member services and public relations at Randolph EMC.

“The technology that the ecobee3 offers adds value for our members while addressing both of these objectives. First, the thermostat helps members more efficiently operate their heating and cooling systems—easily the largest energy user in the home. Likewise, by making an adjustment to the thermostat, the cooperative can lessen the demand for electricity during times when it is most expensive to purchase, which helps save on power costs for all members,” he added.  

The pilot program will make those adjustments no more than eight times per month, and members always have the option to override the signal to continue operating at their desired temperature.

REMC has just a few remaining ecobee3 thermostats available for purchase. For members participating in the pilot project, they will receive their thermostat for $120 + tax (about half the retail price of $249). To learn more about the pilot or to purchase an ecobee3, members may contact REMC at 800-672-8212 or send an email to ecobee3@randolphemc.com.


 

Power Restored to REMC Members After Thursday’s Wind Storm
August 7, 2015

Asheboro, N.C., August 7, 2015—Randolph Electric Membership Corporation crew members worked throughout the night and early morning to restore all power outages as a result of Thursday’s wind storm. REMC’s first weather-related outage call was reported around 3 p.m. on August 6th and crews worked nonstop to make repairs. REMC responded to 45 separate outages affecting more than 2,600 members, located mostly in Southern Randolph County.

Most outages were caused by lightning damage and heavy wind bringing down trees and tree limbs on power lines. Crews reported broken poles and downed power lines in some areas. “We appreciate our members’ patience as crews worked to restore power overnight. Many crews reported having to cut their way through trees that had fallen across the road as they responded to outage locations,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “One extended outage required special equipment to access a broken pole that was in a very remote location amongst fallen trees,” he added.

With rain continuing today, loose tree limbs from yesterday’s event can move and cause additional issues for the distribution system. REMC staff are still on alert and ready to respond if needed. Members who receive electric service from Randolph EMC should report them by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). 

The cooperative urges members to remember that safety is top priority. If an individual encounters a downed power line, he or she should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and a distraction could cause an accident.


 

REMC Crews Working To Restore Outages from Severe Thunderstorms
August 6, 2015

Asheboro, N.C., August 6, 2015- Crews from Randolph Electric Membership Corporation are currently working to restore power to members as strong storms moved through the area Thursday afternoon causing numerous outages across the cooperative’s service territory.  Most outages were caused by lightning damage and fallen trees and tree limbs.

Crews will continue to work around the clock until power is restored. Employees will also remain on alert throughout the night to respond to any additional power outages that may occur due to additional storms.

Members experiencing a power problem or outage should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) for the fastest response. Members may view outage progress at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. Updates are periodically posted on REMC’s Facebook and Twitter pages, as well.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.   


 

Early Bright Ideas Applications Due August 14th!
July 16, 2015

REMC and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have pledged nearly $600,000 to the state’s teachers in Bright Ideas education grant funding for the 2015-16 school year. Grants of up to $2,000 will be awarded directly to local educators for creative, hands-on classroom projects that would not otherwise be funded by traditional school budgets. The grant application opened April 1st and can be found online at www.ncbrightideas.com along with more information about the program.

Applications will be accepted April 1 through Sept. 18, but it could pay to apply early. Teachers who submit their applications by the early bird deadline of Friday, Aug. 14 will be entered to win a Visa gift card.

To apply, teachers must include a budget, explain the implementation, goals, creative elements and evaluation of the project, and have approval from the school principal. Applications will be judged in a competitive evaluation process, and judges will be on the lookout for projects that feature innovation and creativity. The application and grant-writing tips can be found at www.ncbrightideas.com.


 

Play It Safe: Heat Safety
July 6, 2015

North Carolina summers are hot, blazing hot. And in July we typically see our thermometers creep even higher. These temperatures can be dangerous; in fact, according to the National Weather Service, heat is one of the leading weather-related dangers in the United States, causing hundreds of fatalities each year. Follow these simple tips to keep heat-related dangers out of your life this summer and beyond.

  • Drink plenty of water, non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty.
  • Wear lightweight clothes and minimize direct exposure to the sun.
  • Visit public, air-conditioned places like malls or libraries during peak hours of the day to stay cool and take a load off of your HVAC system at home.
  • Use portable electric fans to exhaust hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
  • As tempting as it may be, don’t sit in front of portable electric fans when a room’s temperature is hotter than 90°F. The dry blowing air will dehydrate you faster and exacerbate the problem.
  • Save strenuous activities until the coolest part of the day, usually during early morning or late evening hours.
  • Take a cool bath or shower.
  • If you must go outside during times of extreme heat, minimize your exposure to the heat by staying in shady, grassy areas.   
  • Check on family members, friends and neighbors, especially if they are elderly.

Please be aware of the symptoms of heat exhaustion, which include: heavy sweating, weakness, clammy or pale skin, nausea, confusion and a fast, weak pulse. If you experience any of these symptoms move to a cooler location, loosen your clothing, lie down and take sips of water. Don’t let heat exhaustion become something more serious, like heat stroke. If you think you see someone who could be experiencing a heat stroke, call 911 immediately.

Be safe, be cool and be encouraged that autumn breezes are around the corner!


 

77th Annual Meeting Set for June 19th
June 4, 2015

Asheboro, N.C., June 8, 2015—Randolph Electric Membership Corporation will celebrate its 77th annual meeting of the membership Friday, June 19, 2015, at Southwestern Randolph High School in Asheboro. The doors will open at 5:30 p.m. for members to register and enjoy free homemade ice cream, various informational displays and safety demonstrations. New Southern Ground will provide live entertainment from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., and Captain Jim the Pirate will provide entertainment for children 12 and under during the business meeting.

The business meeting will begin at 7:00 p.m. with the theme, “Focus on the Future.” Members will elect directors for districts five, eight, and nine, and will hear reports from Board President Bob Wright, Secretary-Treasurer Sue Spencer, and Chief Executive Officer Dale Lambert. Following the business meeting, the co-op will hold drawings for registered members to win various door prizes, including cash and bill credits, gift cards, bicycles of all sizes, small appliances and Seagrove pottery.

"We are proud to have served our members for 77 years and look forward to continuing to provide outstanding electric service and benefits to our community in the future," said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "Members of Randolph EMC still enjoy the same benefits members enjoyed in 1938, including being an owner of the company, voting for members to represent them on the co-op’s governing board of directors, and receiving patronage capital disbursements, to name a few.”

The annual meeting is the opportunity for members to exercise one of their most important rights as an REMC member-owner — to vote for the board of directors. Members should bring their registration card, which can be found on the front cover of the June issue of their Carolina Country magazine. We welcome each member’s participation and look forward to a great evening!

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation  

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,500 consumers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties.


 

Play It Safe - Hurricane Safety
June 1, 2015

The month of June officially kicks off the summer season, but it also marks the beginning of a potentially dangerous time—hurricane season. North Carolina sits on the Atlantic coast, and hurricanes often bring flooding, power loss and wind-damage to this area, as well as areas inland. Follow these tips to brush up on what to do before, during and after a storm to keep you safe and minimize damage to your home:

Before a Hurricane:

  • Outline a communications and evacuation plan for your family before a hurricane warning is issued to minimize confusion and fear.  If you have pets or any livestock, include them in your plan.
  • Create an emergency kit that includes 72 hours’ worth of food, water, medication and any other supplies you may need.
  • Bring all lawn furniture, decorations, toys and garbage cans in from outside. Tie down items that can’t be brought in like boats and trailers.
  • Fuel up your car. A loss of electricity could put gas stations out of commission until power is restored.
  • Close windows, doors and hurricane shutters. Plywood can be used to board up windows and doors if your house doesn’t have hurricane shutters.
  • Secure your home and evacuate immediately if you live in a mobile home or flood zone.

During a Hurricane:

  • Stay indoors and away from windows, skylights and glass doors.
  • If flooding is imminent, turn off electricity at the main breaker.
  • Listen to a battery-operated radio or TV for information about the storm and evacuation procedures.
  • Avoid using the phone except for serious emergencies.
  • Do not go outside until officials have issued an all clear, even if the winds have subsided. You may be in the eye of the hurricane and about to face another round of high-winds and heavy rain.

After a Hurricane:

  • Stay alert for extended rainfall and flooding even after the hurricane has passed.
  • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines. Report them immediately to your local co-op.
  • If power was out for an extended period of time, throw out any food that may have spoiled in the refrigerator.
  • Take pictures of any damage that has occurred to your home for insurance purposes.
  • If running a generator, place it in a dry, well-ventilated area away from air intakes into the home. The generator should be properly grounded and connected to appliances with proper power cords.
  • Report power outages to your local electric cooperative.

Preparing for hurricane season will help you stay safe, potentially saving lives and money.  You cannot prevent hurricanes, but you can minimize damage to your home and injury to your family by gathering supplies, preparing your home and planning for a possible storm before the hurricane season starts.


 

Bee Part of the Buzz with the Ecobee3 Smart Thermostat
May 18, 2015

Bee part of something special! Randolph EMC is offering a pilot program to members interested in greater control over your energy use. Ordinary thermostats read the temperature in only one room, but are supposed to deliver comfort in all rooms. Ecobee remote sensors deliver the right temperature in the rooms that matter most. 

Average 23% savings
Homeowners are spending hundreds of dollars a year on heating and cooling their homes, often when they’re not even there to enjoy it. Ecobee delivers comfort when they’re home and savings when they’re not, resulting in an average 23% savings* year after year.

Anytime, anywhere
Monitor and control your Wi-Fi connected ecobee3 anytime, from anywhere, on your smartphone, tablet, or computer.

Free remote sensor
Ecobee3 comes with one free remote sensor and can support up to 32. The sensors measure room temperature, allowing the thermostat to balance the temperature in your home so that it is comfortable in the rooms they are actually in and not just the hallway.

Reliable technology
Ecobee is hard-wired for reliability and has been since 2009 when we created the world’s first Wi-Fi smart thermostat.

Live weather
Start your day with live weather and a preview of the days ahead with a 5-day forecast.

Easy installation
Our streamlined process and auto detection features make installation easier than ever. Average install times will be less than 45 minutes.

What is needed to participate?

  • A Wi-Fi connection
  • Compatible electric HVAC
  • Valid email address

The first 125 eligible REMC members who contact us will be able to purchase an ecobee3 thermostat with sensor for $120a significant savings off the retail rate of $250. By helping the cooperative lower energy use throughout our system during times of peak demand, we are all able to lower our power costs.  

Interested in participating or have more questions? Contact Energy Use Experts Paul Caviness or Michael Trent at 800-672-8212 or email us at ecobee3@randolphemc.com.


 

People Helping People Grant Recipients
May 7, 2015

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation’s People Helping People (PHP) Program recently awarded $11,700 to 11 local non-profit agencies as part of a special Community Grants program. Funding for the awards was made possible by money that PHP received from national cooperative lender CoBank’s Sharing Success matching grant program.

Registered 501(c)(3) organizations in Alamance, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Randolph counties were eligible to apply for funding up to $2,000 to implement programs or purchase needed equipment to facilitate a program, which would help make a positive impact in the communities where Randolph EMC member-owners reside.

“All grant applications were carefully reviewed by the People Helping People Board, noted Katherine Brady, President of People Helping People Board of Directors. “It’s amazing how many great projects our local non-profits are working on and we are honored to have the opportunity to help make a positive impact in our home communities,” she added.

“With such a great need in our communities, the board voted to add a little extra money from our reserves to raise the grants awarded to $11,700. We are extremely proud to award these grants and know our support will impact many families, friends and members of the communities that we serve,” Brady said.

People Helping People enables members to “round up” their monthly electric bills to the nearest dollar. The extra change goes into the People Helping People account, which is used to provide financial support to individuals and organizations within the five counties served by Randolph EMC. In 2014 alone, People Helping People supported 88 Randolph EMC members totaling $11,825 in donations.

This is the third year that People Helping People has received funding from CoBank’s Sharing Success matching grant program. In previous years, grants were used to build up the organization’s reserves; however, this year’s $5,000 grant, combined with Randolph EMC’s matching $5,000 donation, was earmarked to help non-profit agencies with high-impact projects.  

The eleven 2015 grants awarded through People Helping People are:

$1,200: Troy Elementary School – Funding will help purchase new playground equipment for both students of Troy Elementary School and all children and families within the Troy community.

$1,500: Montgomery County 4-H – Money will be used to purchase an enclosed pull-behind trailer, allowing students to attend more events and support growth in community agriculture programs.

$1,000: Communities in Schools of Moore County – Funding will support the Little Schoolhouse Books for Children Program, which supplies books to primary and elementary school students, reinforcing that reading is an enjoyable and beneficial activity.

$500: Sandhills Moore Coalition – Funding will support the needs of Moore County neighbors by providing food, clothing and financial resources in emergency situations.

$900: Prancing Horse Foundation – Funding will support therapeutic riding programs that provides services to special need students in Moore County.

$1,200: Central Asheboro Boys & Girls Club  Funding will help purchase new tables, chairs and digital cameras for the after school technology development program. Not only will this help children with homework, but will help them learn new skills for the future.

$1,000: Christians United Outreach Center – Funding will be used to help purchase and install two new computers to support the medical assistance and homeless program, helping streamline many processes.

$1,200: Communities in Schools of Randolph County – Funding will support the Backpack Pals Program. This program provides food over the weekend to more than 600 elementary and middle school students in Randolph County who live in food insecure situations.

$800: Eastern Randolph Food Pantry – Similar to Backpack Pals, funding will support high school students who need food on the weekend, when lunch and dinner cannot be provided at home. 

$1,200: Randolph County Partnership for Children – Money will be used to support the Reach Out and Read program. During their first well-child visit, every child between the ages of six months and five years will receive a new, developmentally-appropriate children’s book to take home and keep. Reach Out and Read promotes early literacy and school readiness.

$1,200: Randolph County Senior Adults Association – Funding will support the home-delivered meals and congregate nutrition program to homebound senior citizens.


 

REMC Announces Sports Camp Scholarship Winners
April 29, 2015

Congratulations to REMC’s recent basketball scholarship recipients. Lauren Resor, a 7th grader at Uwharrie Middle School in Asheboro and Mariah Brown, 6th grader at Southeastern Middle School, who were awarded the NC State Women’s Wolfpack Basketball Camp Scholarships. Brodey King, an 8th grader at West Pine Middle in Seven Lakes, was selected to attend the Roy Williams Basketball Camp at UNC-Chapel Hill.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship program, sponsored by Randolph EMC and the state’s 26 electric cooperatives, sends more than 50 students statewide to learn from renowned collegiate coaches and athletes each year. Both camps will work closely with students to develop fundamental skills that will help the young athletes excel both on and off the court.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camps program provides a unique educational and athletic opportunity for outstanding students across our state and is yet another way the cooperatives are demonstrating their commitment to North Carolina communities.


 

Adam Davis, 2015 Youth Tour Winner
April 13, 2015

Adam R. Davis, a junior at Wheatmore High School, was selected to represent Randolph Electric as the cooperative’s delegate for the 2015 NC Rural Electric Youth Tour in Washington, D.C., June 13-19th.

Adam will join more than 1,500 high school students from across the country to learn about cooperatives, the rural electric program, U.S. history, government and democracy. He will meet with congressional leaders and tour Capitol Hill, national monuments, Arlington National Cemetery and the Smithsonian Museums.

Adam was selected to be Randolph Electric's delegate for the NRECA Youth Tour based on his community involvement, academic success and an essay about how electricity benefits our community and the importance of the cooperative business model related to grassroots advocacy. Adam is the son of Helen and Alan Davis of Trinity.


 

Play It Safe: Spring Cleaning and Safety
April 2, 2015

The longer days and warmer air usher in an urge to purge for many of us. Whether that means tidying up a few things or hunting every dust bunny in the house, there are a few simple tips you can follow to stay safe while spring cleaning.

Using Household Cleaners:

  • Use cleaners according to their directions in well-ventilated areas to avoid breathing in harsh fumes. If you aren’t able to open a window to get fresh air, turn on an exhaust fan or use a portable fan to keep air circulating throughout the room.
  • Wear rubber gloves while cleaning to protect your hands from chemicals and hot water.
  • When in doubt, don’t mix cleaning products together. Mixing ammonia and bleach—two common household cleaners—creates toxic fumes than can cause serious harm.
  • Store cleaning supplies in a secure place away from pets and children when you’re done using them.

Watch Your Step:

  • Falling is one of the leading causes of injuries in American homes, so use ladders and step stools carefully when cleaning those hard-to-reach places.
  • Be mindful of where your vacuum cord is, as running over it could cut the cord and create a shock from the exposed wires. Also be sure to coil up the cord after you’re finished vacuuming to avoid creating a trip hazard.
  • Use caution when moving furniture and appliances. Proper lifting technique is to lift with your legs while keeping your back straight.
  • De-cluttering isn’t just for looks—it can eliminate many fire and trip hazards. This spring, go through the clutter and decide what needs to be thrown away, donated or taken to storage.

Things to Check:

  • Change the batteries in your smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector. Remember to dispose of old batteries in a battery recycling or hazardous waste center.
  • Open your electrical service panel and check to make sure there are no new scorch marks around breakers or fuses.
  • Have a professional look at your air conditioning system before the peak summer temperatures arrive to make sure it’s running efficiently.

Now it’s time to throw open the windows, grab the duster and get to it! Don’t miss your chance to get a fresh start and a happy, clean home.


 

Apply Now for Bright Ideas Grants!
April 2, 2015

REMC and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have pledged nearly $600,000 to the state’s teachers in Bright Ideas education grant funding for the 2015-16 school year. Grants of up to $2,000 will be awarded directly to local educators for creative, hands-on classroom projects that would not otherwise be funded by traditional school budgets. The grant application opens April 1st and can be found online at www.ncbrightideas.com along with more information about the program.

Applications will be accepted April 1 through Sept. 18, but it could pay to apply early. Teachers who submit their applications by the early bird deadline of Friday, Aug. 14 will be entered to win a Visa gift card.

To apply, teachers must include a budget, explain the implementation, goals, creative elements and evaluation of the project, and have approval from the school principal. Applications will be judged in a competitive evaluation process, and judges will be on the lookout for projects that feature innovation and creativity. The application and grant-writing tips can be found at www.ncbrightideas.com.


 

Play It Safe: Home Renovation Safety
March 1, 2015

The days are longer, the ground is thawing and lots of people are eager to take on yard and gardening projects that will give their home a fresh face for spring. Whether your plans include building a new deck or just planting shrubbery, follow a few safety tips to make sure your spring is a happy one.

  • Digging in the Ground: Utility lines often run underground across properties at varying depths. It’s important to get your utility lines marked before every digging job, even small projects like planting shrubs, because accidentally striking one of these lines could be deadly.  Call 811 at least three business days before starting your project to have the utility lines marked for free. Don’t gamble with your safety.
  • Using Electrical Lawn & Garden Products: From lawnmowers to hedge trimmer to chainsaws and everything in between, there are lots of different types of yard tools. Because you may use some tools infrequently, it’s especially important to study each product’s manual for safe operation rules. Children should always be kept away from lawnmowers and other lawn equipment with sharp blades or fast moving parts. Additionally, safety guards should never be removed from such equipment and power cords should be kept out of the working path to eliminate the chance of cutting a cord and causing electrical shock.
  • Staying Clear of Power Lines: Whether you’re cleaning the gutters, trimming a tree, or doing some painting, always look for overhead wires. Be sure to maintain at least a 10-foot distance from any overhead power line and only use a fiberglass ladder, which is a safer alternative to wooden or metal ladders. If a ladder falls on a power line, do not try to move it. Call our offices for help.

Go ahead. Take on your spring home improvement projects, but remember to put safety first.


 

REMC Restoring Outages: 6:30 a.m. Update
February 26, 2015

Crews worked throughout the night to restore scattered outages across our system. At this time, around 450 members are without power across Alamance, Randolph and Montgomery Counties.

The heavy, wet snow that fell overnight has weighed down tree limbs and power lines. Most outages were caused by broken tree limbs on lines, but some areas saw broken poles and lines that were more severe.
Please remember to stay away from all downed or fallen power lines, as they may still be energized. Members should report any power issues to 1-877-736-2633.


 

REMC Restoring Power Following Heavy Snow
February 26, 2015

As of 9:00 a.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corporation crews are restoring 15 scattered outages affecting less than 100 members in Randolph and Montgomery counties. 

Heavy snow fell overnight, weighing down tree limbs and power lines across the system. REMC’s crews worked throughout the night to restore scattered outages across its five-county territory. Fallen trees and tree limbs on lines have been responsible for most outages, though crews encountered broken poles and power lines in some areas.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph Electric Membership Corporation and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633).

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.  


 

2 p.m. Update: REMC Restores Power to Members After Storm Remus
February 26, 2015

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation reports that as of 2 p.m., Thursday, February 26th, approximately 70 members of the electric cooperative remain without power. On February 25th, heavy snow fell overnight, weighing down tree limbs and power lines across the system.  Heavy snow resulting in fallen trees and tree limbs on lines were responsible for most outages along with broken poles and downed power lines in some areas. During the storm, REMC had 76 outages impacting 1,957 members mostly in the Alamance and Randolph County territories.

“We have restored power to the majority of our members that were affected by the storm,” said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. “We have crews working on all active outages and appreciate everyone's patience as we restore power back to their homes and businesses.”

The cooperative urges members to remember that safety is top priority. With lines still on the ground, it is important to stay well away from them, even if they have been down for awhile. Never attempt to move a downed line or cut a tree from one.

Members who receive their electricity from Randolph EMC should still report all outages to 1-877-736-2633. For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Minimal Damage to REMC from Winter Weather
February 26, 2015

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is prepared to respond to power outages throughout the night that may occur as a result of Wednesday’s winter weather event. REMC’s first weather-related outage call was reported around 10:30 p.m. on February 25, and crews have worked nonstop throughout the night and day to make repairs. Cooperative crews had restored all initial outages by 3:15 p.m. today; however, as the snow continues to melt, additional outages are being reported. As of 5:30 p.m., crews are working to restore one outage affecting just 20 members. To date, REMC has experienced 76 outages affecting nearly 2,000 members.

In most cases, outages were the result of heavy snow weighing down trees and bringing them in contact with power lines. Crews also encountered broken poles and power lines in some areas. “Randolph EMC has been fortunate that the outages reported throughout the night and today were not major events,” said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. “As thawing occurs, tree limbs can move and cause additional issues for the distribution system. We may continue to see some scattered outages as the snow melts, and want our members to know that we are still on alert and ready to respond if they need us,” he added.

The cooperative urges members to remember that safety is top priority. If an individual encounters a downed power line, he or she should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

Members who receive electric service from Randolph EMC should report them by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633).  For updates on power outages, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Prepared for Winter Weather
February 25, 2015

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring winter storm advisories issued for its service area in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties.

The National Weather Service is warning of heavy snow accumulation in central North Carolina late this evening and overnight. Randolph EMC has activated its Emergency Response Plan and line technician crews and customer service staff are on stand-by in preparation to respond to outages at any time of the day or night. With the possibility of heavy snow, there is a chance for downed trees and power outages for some areas of our system.

Now is the time to take precautions to ensure that you and your family stay warm and safe if there are outages. The American Red Cross recommends making an emergency preparedness kit that includes water, nonperishable food, flashlights, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra batteries, medicines and a first aid kit. It is also a good idea to charge cell phones, tablets or laptops now.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should report all outages by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

For updates on power outages, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Prepared for Extreme Cold Weather Response
February 18, 2015

February 18, 2015 (Asheboro, N.C.)—With arctic temperatures and gusty winds expected in central North Carolina this week, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation has extra line technician crews on stand-by, ready to respond quickly to any outages that might occur.

“Additional crews will be on alert in both our Asheboro and Robbins districts to minimize outage times as much as possible,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “We understand the inconvenience of a power outage at any time, but with such extreme temperatures anticipated this week, it's important that our members know that we’re ready to respond at any time of the day or night,” he added.

The cooperative is also prepared for the increased energy load that comes with the extreme cold, but urges members to be prepared as well. The forecasted low temperatures will likely cause increased energy usage for members with electric heat—even those who leave their thermostats at a set temperature. Heating systems must work harder and longer to maintain the set temperatures when the weather is this cold, potentially causing bills to be higher than expected.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage. For the fastest response time, members should be sure the cooperative has their current phone numbers on file so that the outage management system can immediately notify dispatchers of the situation. To update or add home and cell phone numbers, members can call either the Asheboro or Robbins offices or visit www.RandolphEMC.com to update online. 

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.  


 

REMC Reports No Outages from Winter Storm
February 17, 2015

Asheboro, N.C., February 17, 2015 — Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is reporting no weather-related outages for its service territory following the winter storm that was predicted to release up to three-quarters of an inch of ice in some areas.

“We were very fortunate that the storm’s track stayed to the south of Randolph Electric’s service area,” said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. “With the amount of ice that was predicted, this could have very well been a devastating event for the areas hardest hit. Our employee team monitored weather conditions throughout the night and stood ready to respond when calls came in. Thankfully, those calls never came,” he added.

Cooperatives to the south of Randolph EMC and in other areas did receive some ice accumulation and associated outages. Through a mutual aid agreement across the state, Randolph crews are on standby to assist other cooperatives if needed.

If power outages should occur during the day, members who receive electric service from Randolph Electric should report them by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Likewise, the public is urged to avoid travel if at all possible while the roads remain in icy conditions.

For updates on power outages, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Stay Safe During Power Outages
February 16, 2015

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation stresses the importance of being prepared for these potentially dangerous ice storms and the potential power outages that they may cause over the course of the next few days. Having the right supplies and knowing how to stay warm safely are keys to weathering a winter storm emergency.

  • Always keep a battery-powered radio or TV, flashlights, and a supply of fresh batteries in case of an emergency.
  • Know where to find extra blankets.
  • Fill spare containers with water for washing, and keep a supply of bottled drinking water on hand.
  • Keep a supply of non-perishable food items, along with a hand opener for canned food.
  • Switch off lights and appliances to prevent overloading circuits and damaging appliances when power is restored. Leave one lamp or switch on as a signal for when your power returns.
  • To prevent water pipes from freezing, keep faucets turned on slightly so that water drips from the tap. Know how to shut off water valves just in case a pipe bursts.
  • Check on elderly or disabled friends and neighbors.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph Electric Membership Corporation and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.   


 

REMC Prepared for Winter Weather Response
February 16, 2015

Asheboro, N.C., February 16, 2015 — Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring winter storm advisories issued for its service area in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties.

The National Weather Service is warning of “potentially crippling ice accumulations” in central North Carolina late this evening and overnight. Randolph EMC has activated its Emergency Response Plan and line technician crews and customer service staff are on stand-by in preparation to respond to outages at any time of the day or night. With up to a half-inch of ice predicted in some areas, there is a strong possibility for widespread downed trees and prolonged power outages for our system.

Now is the time to take precautions to ensure that you and your family stay warm and safe if there are outages. The American Red Cross recommends making an emergency preparedness kit that includes water, nonperishable food, flashlights, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra batteries, medicines and a first aid kit. It is also a good idea to charge cell phones, tablets or laptops now.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should report all outages by calling 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

For updates on power outages, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation Responds to Wind-Related Outages
February 15, 2015

February 15, 2015 (Asheboro, N.C.)—As of 3:30 a.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is working to restore just two remaining outages affecting approximately 500 members. Overnight, strong, gusty winds up to 45 mph accompanying a strong cold front moving across central North Carolina caused broken tree limbs and uprooted trees to damage lines across REMC’s system.

During this weather event, three broken poles caused an extended outage for around 500 members in the River Road area of Montgomery County. Likewise, crews encountered two broken crossarms that brought down lines near the Town of Robbins. Tough terrain where those lines were located extended the outage for those 100 or so members affected.

Crews have been assigned to all reported outages at this time and are working as quickly and safely as possible to restore power. Employees and crews will remain on alert throughout the night to respond to any additional power outages that occur as a result of continuing high winds.

If your electric service is provided by Randolph Electric Membership Corporation and you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.   


 

Update on Wind-Related Outages
February 15, 2015

As of 6:30 a.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corporation crews have restored the known overnight outages caused by wind damage. REMC will continue to monitor the weather throughout the day, and crews will remain on alert to respond to any other outages reported. Please report any power issues to 1-877-736-2633.


 

Randolph EMC’s People Helping People Fund to Help Local Nonprofit Agencies
February 3, 2015

In 2015, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation’s People Helping People program will administer grant funds to nonprofit agencies in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Alamance and Chatham counties for funding up to $2,000 per organization. A total of $10,000 will be dispersed to implement programs or purchase needed equipment to facilitate a program, which will help make a positive impact in our local communities.

People Helping People (PHP) is a program that provides financial support to organizations and individuals within the five counties served by Randolph EMC. Money for members is raised by members. Those who wish to participate simply elect to round up their power bills to the nearest dollar each month. 

Proposal requests will be accepted through March 31st, 2015. Once this information has been reviewed and approved, the People Helping People Board will send your organization a grant application to be completed and submitted no later than April 6th, 2015.

To receive a grant application, please send a brief letter of request stating the following: Organization name; Intended goal; Amount of funding requested and how the funding will be utilized locally. All Request for Proposals need to be directed to Lauren Ingold, Randolph EMC/PHP, PO Box 40, Asheboro, NC 27204.

For additional questions, please contact Lauren Ingold at Lauren.Ingold@RandolpEMC.com or at 336-625-5177 ext. 2338 or visit Randolph Electric’s website at www.RandolphEMC.com.


 

Kitchen Safety- Play It Safe
February 1, 2015

The kitchen is one of the most used rooms in your home, but did you know that it’s also the one with the most potential dangers? According to the National Fire Protection Association, the kitchen is the number one place for home fires and home injuries in the United States because of open flames, knives, hot liquids and bacteria. Whether you’re cooking a four course meal or just heating up a frozen dinner, here’s what you need to know to stay safe in the kitchen.

The Basics:

  • Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds before handling food and after handling raw meat. Additionally, store raw meat and poultry separate from other items to avoid cross-contamination of bacteria.
  • Store knives and other sharp objects either in a drawer or block that’s out of children’s reach.
  • Use caution when lifting lids off of hot pots or opening microwave-cooked packages. Always make sure the opening is away from you so that the steam doesn’t cause burns.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher in your kitchen, and know how to use it.

Appliance Safety:

  • Never use an extension cord to plug in cooking appliances. Plug appliances directly into wall outlets.
  • Keep all electric appliances away from the sink or anywhere that they may be splashed by water.
  • When using small electric appliances, place cords away from cook tops. This will minimize the chance of something getting snagged on a cord and causing a spill of hot oils or foods.

Stovetop Safety:

  • If you have a natural gas stove, the flame should burn blue with a bit of yellow. A flame that doesn’t appear this way suggests there is an incomplete combustion of fuel. If you are experiencing this problem, seek professional help to ensure carbon monoxide isn’t being released into your home.
  • Clean grease and other flammable debris from your burners, stove top, and oven to prevent catching fire.
  • Always turn pot handles inward to avoid knocking a pot of hot liquid or food off of the stove.
  • Keep dish towels, pot holders, and other flammable material away from the stove. Also pull back loose clothes and long hair so that they don’t catch fire from hot burners.

 

NC Electric Cooperatives Support North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC
January 26, 2015

Each year, North Carolina's Electric Cooperative CEO's hold a golf tournament as a fundraiser for the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC. This year’s golf tournament, held in October, raised a record $133,939.75 for the burn center. Dale Lambert, CEO at Randolph Electric and advisory board member along with Bob Goodson, Senior Vice President and COO of North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives, Lonnie Moore, Senior Vice President and COO of Tarheel Electric Membership Association, and Brenda Yarborough, Administrative Assistant of North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives were on hand at the January 22nd board meeting in Chapel Hill to make the check presentation. Thanks to all the Electric Cooperatives, their vendors and partners who work hard to make the golf tournament a success each year.


 

Play-It-Safe: Be Wary of Scams in the New Year
January 6, 2015

As we embark on a new year, Randolph EMC is reminding members to keep a close watch on their financial information. Throughout 2014, members reported receiving fraudulent calls from scammers posing as REMC employees. Falling for a scam could prove very expensive, resulting in stolen identity, bank and credit card fraud, and, in the case of those believing their electric bill has been paid, power being disconnected for non-payment. Keep these tips in mind to avoid being scammed:

  • Randolph EMC will NEVER call and ask for sensitive personal information over the phone.
  • The co-op's policy is not to contact members to solicit personal information, simply to notify them that an account is past due. When account payment, collections or disconnect services do become necessary, the co-op will not demand that a member pay in any specific way. Before giving out personal information, consider initiating the call to the co-op yourself.
  • REMC employees visit a home only in response to a service request. If a service call has not been scheduled or requested, do not allow the person to enter your house.
  • When an employee or contractor does come in response to a service call, check identification and make sure the service truck is clearly marked with the Randolph EMC logo.

It’s important to note that Randolph EMC does use phone calls to notify members of a past-due balance or pending disconnection, to conduct member satisfaction surveys, or to verify that an outage has been restored. When in doubt of whether a call is legitimate or not, the best thing to do is hang up and call your local cooperative office. 


 

Sports Camp Scholarships for Middle-School Students
January 2, 2015

Randolph Electric is now accepting applications from middle-school students for all-expense paid scholarships to summer basketball camps at the University of North Carolina and N.C. State University. Young men can apply to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp in Chapel Hill, and young women can vie for a spot at the Wolfpack Women’s Basketball Camp in Raleigh.

Students can download an application at www.ncelectriccooperatives.com beginning Jan. 2, 2015.  Randolph EMC will select one student for each camp in a competitive process based on academics, extra-curricular activities and a short essay. Rising sixth through eighth graders are eligible to apply, and the final application deadline is March 31.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship program, sponsored by Randolph EMC and the state’s 26 electric cooperatives, sends more than 50 students statewide to learn from renowned collegiate coaches and athletes each year. Both camps will work closely with students to develop fundamental skills that will help the young athletes excel both on and off the court.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camps program provides a unique educational and athletic opportunity for outstanding students across our state and is yet another way the cooperatives are demonstrating their commitment to North Carolina communities.

For more information, please contact Lauren Ingold at 336-625-5177 ext. 2338 or at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

Play It Safe – Winter Safety Tips
January 1, 2015

Winter Safety Tips

Did you know? – Monthly average temperatures in North Carolina are the lowest in January, resulting in the increased chance of snow, sleet, freezing rain or a wintry mix, according to the State Climate Office of North Carolina. Our state saw its fair share of winter storms in 2014, so let’s all take the time now to reacquaint ourselves with winter safety tips.  

Safety Precautions Before A Storm Hits

  • Create an “emergency supply kit” full of essentials like blankets, flashlights, batteries, food and first aid items.
  • Fill up your car with gas. Since gas stations often rely on electricity to power their pumps, a power outage may leave you stranded and without gas.
  • We work with arborists to employ a right-of-way program that keeps tree limbs clear from power lines to ensure system reliability. However, if you see limbs near power lines close to your home, please call our office so we can address the issue. Do not try to trim trees near power lines yourself.  

Driving safety

  • If possible, avoid driving during winter storms. If you absolutely have to drive, be sure to clear your windows and mirrors before getting on the road.
  • Reduce your speed and maintain a safe following distance behind other vehicles because snow and ice may cause skidding.
  • Do not apply the brakes if you begin to slide. Instead, take your foot off of the gas and turn the steering wheel in the direction of the slide.
  • If traffic lights are out, treat the intersection like a four-way stop.
  • Use extreme caution when crossing bridges and overpasses as they accumulate ice before other parts of the road.

Protecting Your Home During Winter Weather

  • Prevent your pipes from freezing by turning your faucets on just enough so they can drip.
  • If using a space heater or heat lamp, be sure to place it on a solid surface at least three feet away from anything combustible. Always turn off space heaters before leaving the room or going to sleep.
  • Never leave a fireplace unless its embers are completely extinguished. Also consider using a glass or metal fire screen to catch sparks and rolling logs, and never store flammable liquids near sources of heat.
  • Know how to use your generator. Generators should be placed in an open and ventilated area. They should never be operated inside a home—including spaces like the basement and garage—due to the danger of inhaling carbon monoxide fumes.

Let’s hope for an easy winter with no severe weather and power outages, but you just never know. Stay safe, plan now.


 

Giving Back To Our Community
December 22, 2014

An organization that is near and dear to Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is the U.S Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program. This organization collects new, unwrapped toys during October, November and December each year, and distributes those toys as Christmas gifts to less fortunate children in the community. With REMC employees generous fundraising support, 44 bicycles will be distributed to children in Montgomery, Moore and Randolph counties. As a result, there will be many happy children receiving bicycles on Christmas morning.


 

PHP Truck Winner Announced
December 19, 2014

Congratulations to Rex Brewer of Eagle Springs who received keys to a 2006 Chevrolet Colorado truck that was retired from the REMC fleet. The drawing was held for members who signed up to participate in Randolph EMC’s People Helping People program for at least 24 months. We'd like to thank EVERY member who participates in People Helping People—you are each a blessing to our membership and are helping to make a difference in our local communities!


 

2015 Youth Tour- Shaping Tomorrow’s Leaders
December 10, 2014

In 2015, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation will again award one deserving rising high school junior or senior an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. the week of June 13-19th. The trip brings together more than 1,500 highly talented, ambitious young people from across the country for an incredible week in the nation's capital to further develop their leadership skills. 

In D.C., students will visit their congressional representative’s office on Capitol Hill; discuss current events with legislators; and tour The Smithsonian Institution, Washington National Cathedral, Mount Vernon and Arlington National Cemetery, which includes a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns. Students also will learn more about the electric cooperative business model and the crucial role that political representation plays, and gain a greater understanding of what differentiates America from other countries.

From an educational standpoint, Youth Tour:

  • Rewards students for academic achievement and community leadership;
  • Educates students about the role of electric co-ops in the national economy;
  • Fosters students’ appreciation for the democratic form of government;
  • Exposes students to the sights and sounds of our nation’s heritage; and
  • Builds students’ leadership skills so that they may make a difference in their communities.

“I would highly recommend any rising junior or senior to apply to become the 2015 Randolph Electric Youth Tour Delegate,” notes Tanner Henson, REMC’s 2014 Youth Tour Delegate. “The opportunity is once in a lifetime and one not to be forgotten.”

For more information or questions, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com or 336-625-5177 ext. 2338. Download your application on Randolph Electric’s website at www.RandolphEMC.com and send it in before March 16, 2015.  


 

Stay Safe this Holiday Season
November 25, 2014

Your holiday wish list almost certainly doesn't include a trip to the hospital. Get our tips to help you trim the tree, light up the house and relax by an open fire, without having to worry about injuries to you, the kids or your pets.

  • Don't use holiday lights unless they have cleared the strict safety tests conducted by Underwriters Lab or another established testing facility. Lights checked by the independent testing company are marked with a holographic UL label. A red label means lights can be used indoors and out, while green means indoor-use only.
  • You want your lights to shine, not sparks to fly! Your source of power should come from a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) outlet. This type of outlet will shut the circuit down if there is overcurrent. If you don't have a GFCI outlet, a qualified electrician can permanently install one outdoors for holiday seasons to come. You can also opt to buy a portable outdoor unit from your local home store for less than $20.
  • Read labels for lights and other wired decorations to make sure you're conforming to acceptable wattage levels. If your decorations are connected by a tangled web of extension cords and power strips, you may be overloading the circuits.
  • Check all electric lights and decorations to see if they're damaged or worn. Cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires and loose connections may pose a fire or shock hazard.
  • Don't smoke out Santa or your other guests with a dirty chimney. Have your fireplace and wood stove inspected annually and cleaned, if needed.
  • Placement is everything with candles — keep them away from curtains, bedding, paper, walls or any other areas with the potential to combust, as candle flames can heat up to 1000 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Put out a candle with two inches of wax left, or a half-inch in a container, to prevent heat damage to a table or a glass container from breaking. Use a sturdy, non-combustible candleholder that can collect drippings and won't tip over.

 

REMC Announces Bright Ideas Grant Winners for 2014-15
November 12, 2014

Congratulations to Randolph EMC’s Bright Ideas grant winners! Bright Ideas education grants, sponsored by Randolph Electric and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives, provide resources to educators for innovative, hands-on, classroom projects up to $2,000 that would not otherwise be funded. This year, Randolph Electric will fund nine projects that will touch the lives of more than 1,500 local students.

Proposals can come from any area of the curriculum. Projects must directly benefit students, provide ongoing benefits, and use innovative teaching methods. A panel of retired educators representing Randolph, Moore and Montgomery County Schools carefully review and discuss each application before deciding on these final awards.

“We’re thrilled to award these dedicated educators with Bright Ideas grants,” said Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at Randolph Electric. “Their creative projects will no doubt help students reach their full potential and spark higher interest in learning for years to come.”

Grants Awarded:

  • Mr. Barry Barber, South Asheboro Middle School - $1,200 for Historic Asheboro Walking App: Students will develop a walking tour app that brings to life the people, places, and events of downtown Asheboro. Following research of primary and secondary sources and interviews with local historians, students will combine audio narration, historic images, and digital video to create an enriched experience for residents and visitors to Asheboro.
  • Ms. Melissa Brown, Trinity High School - $1,425 for Kids in the Kitchen: Cooking incorporates reading, math, communication and self-help skills. With grant funding, Mrs. Brown's class will receive a new stove, refrigerator and microwave for the Occupational Course of Study program.
  • Mr. Joshua Causey, Donna Lee Loflin Elementary School - $1,085 for Mr. Causey’s Opus: This grant will purchase 10 student-sized acoustical guitars to be used in a guitar class after school. In addition to the instruments, the grant funds will purchase replacement strings, tuners and a guitar method book for the students to use.
  • Mrs. Kristin Jones, Southwestern Randolph High School - $1,116 for Cougar’s Pizza: Special Education students from the Occupational Course of Study and Functional Skills classes will work with students from the Pro-Start classes to prepare pizzas, salads and desserts for school faculty and staff once a month. In addition, students will run a restaurant to serve patrons.
  • Ms. Ella Kern, Donna Lee Loflin Elementary School-$1,091 for Tinkering with Character Traits: Students will combine littleBits® Open Hardware with arts and crafts materials to tell a story that brings some essential character trait of each character to life. This is wonderful STEAM enhancement to a language arts lesson based on archetypes from myth, fable, folk and fairy tales, or popular culture.
  • Mrs. Amy Leveille, Neighbor’s Grove Christian Academy-$870 for Indoor Grow Lab and Vegetable Garden:Students will start vegetable plants in an indoor classroom grow lab. They will discuss the benefits of good nutrition and planting your own food. Students will build a raised bed for transplanting their vegetable once the plants are ready to be moved outside.
  • Mrs. Chrissy Neelon, Southwestern Randolph High School-$1,980 for iPad Air to Art: Technology is an increasingly important tool for young artists. Working artists of all kinds use computer technology. With grant funding, Mrs. Neelon's art classes will utilize 3 iPad Air tablets to create original digital art using Sketchbook Pro software.
  • Ms. Cassandra Salabak, Charles W. McCrary Elementary School-$302 for Boys Only Book Club: This club, active for two years already, partners students with adult males to facilitate growth in reading with a role model. No girls are allowed to participate, which shows boys that reading is not just for girls!
  • Mrs. Jamie Staley, Coleridge Elementary School-$931 for Project Read: Kindergartners will use tablets and software to help with reading and mathematics. A storybook application will help them listen to books while they see the words as they go across the screen, tracking their progress and providing learning targets for them to reach. Math applications also help reinforce math concepts learned in the classroom.

 

Electrical Safety and Your Pet
November 3, 2014

Household pets are not immune to electrical injury; they are curious little creatures, and just as you protect your children from electrical hazards, you should protect your pets. Pets don’t understand the difference between chewing on something like a shoe and chewing on a cord or even an electrical appliance. Pets may also inadvertently cause electrical hazards in your home, but the following tips will help eliminate the chances of an electrical accident involving your pet:

  • Be sure to keep electrical cords away from your pets. If you have difficulty keeping your pets from chewing on cords, you may have to paint the cords with a bitter tasting polish or wrap them in a plastic sleeve. 
  • Keep lamps away from play areas for pets and children. Some bulbs, especially halogen bulbs, can get extremely hot, and if accidentally knocked over can become a fire hazard.
  • If your pet lives outdoors, be sure to bring them inside or provide a safe place for them to stay in during storms.  Dogs on chains are more susceptible to a lightning strike.
  • Pets have a tendency to like to nap near electronics that produce heat, like warm computer equipment. Break this habit immediately. Pets should be kept away from all electrical connections.
  • Keep all electrical devices a safe distance from water sources. Your pet may accidentally knock electrical devices over, creating a dangerous situation.

Be a proactive pet owner. Create a hazard-free home for your furry friend. 


 

Trick-or-Treat Safety
October 13, 2014

Trick or treat? Halloween is a spooky occasion, but just because it’s spooky doesn’t mean it can’t be safe. There are a few “tricks” for that. Follow this advice, and your little ghouls will be happy and safe, albeit a bit sugar-buzzed.

Costume Care:
So much of the excitement around Halloween comes from the anticipation of getting to wear the perfect costume - a pirate, a witch, a monster or maybe even a princess. As you’re planning your little one’s costume, keep these tips in mind:

  • A light colored costume is ideal for visibility, but if that just isn’t the “look” this year, adhere some reflective tape to the trick-or-treat bag and the front and back of the costume.
  • Be sure your child can see out of any masks they are wearing, and when possible, use face paint rather than a mask to prevent impaired vision.
  • Make sure shoes and costumes fit properly. You don’t want your little goblins to trip and fall.
  • Only buy costumes and wigs that are flame retardant.

Trick-or-Treating:
When it’s time to show off that costume and load up on candy, these tips will help keep your kids safe:

  • Young children should always be accompanied by an adult when trick-or-treating, but if they are older, be sure to review an acceptable route and establish a certain time to be home. Older children should also use the “buddy system” when trick-or-treating.
  • Make sure your little monsters creep around on sidewalks, not the road.
  • Carry a flashlight to help you navigate as the sun goes down.
  • Your child may forget basic rules because of all of the excitement, so be sure to remind them to look both ways for cars before crossing the street.
  • Only approach houses that have their porch lights on.
  • Check your child’s candy before they devour it, and throw away any opened candy.

A Trick Proof Home:
Keep your home, your visitors and your kids safe with these helpful reminders:

  • Before trick-or-treaters come to your home, pick up anything they could trip on and make sure the area is well lit.
  • Restrain all pets while there are trick-or-treaters.
  • Never leave a jack-o-lantern with a lit candle unattended, and never leave children alone near a lit jack-o-lantern.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher handy just in case, and consider using battery-powered “candles” to illuminate your jack-o-lantern.

Have a perfectly safe and spooky night. Boo!


 

October is National Co-op Month!
October 1, 2014

Today marks the beginning of National #CoopMonth! Join us as we celebrate! We’re proud of the fact that we serve our members in the best way possible. Please stop in one of our offices for a special treat along with a chance to win some great prizes. As always, we thank you for being a valued member of REMC!


 

September is National Preparedness Month
September 5, 2014

If an emergency occurred tomorrow, would you be ready?

September is National Preparedness Month. Sponsored by FEMA, National Preparedness Month aims to educate and empower Americans to prepare for and respond to all types of emergencies, including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks.

National Preparedness Month is a time to prepare yourself and those in your care for emergencies and disasters, both large scale and smaller local events. We know that emergencies can happen unexpectedly in communities just like yours, to people like you. We’ve seen tornado outbreaks, river floods and flash floods, historic earthquakes, tsunamis, and even water main breaks and power outages that impact communities for days at a time.

As commendable as they may be in their profession of assisting those in need, police, fire and rescue may not always be able to reach you quickly in an emergency or disaster. The most important step you can take in helping your local responders is being able to take care of yourself and those in your care for at least a short period of time following an incident; the more people who are prepared, the quicker the community will recover.

You are not helpless in the face of an emergency. With just a few simple steps, you can Be a Force of Nature by knowing your risk, taking action and being an example in your community.

Know your risk

Emergencies can happen anywhere, at any time. It is important to understand potential risks where you live.

What you can do:

  1. Bookmark weather.gov to stay informed on severe weather.
  2. Learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts, messages that will be sent to your phone during an emergency.
  3. Get practical tips on preparing for disaster at ready.gov.

Take action

Make sure that you and your family are prepared for an emergency. Ensure that you can go for at least three days without electricity, water service, access to a supermarket, or other local services.
What you can do:

  1. Prepare a disaster supply kit with at least three days of food and water.
  2. Create a Family Emergency Plan, so that your family knows how to communicate during an emergency.
  3. Obtain a NOAA Weather Radio.

Be an example

Be a positive influence on your community by sharing your preparedness story. Let your friends and family know that you’re prepared for an emergency – and that they should be prepared too. Research has shown that many people won’t prepare until they see others doing so.
What you can do:

  1. Share your preparedness story on Facebook so that friends and family will know what you’ll do in case of disaster.
  2. Tell the world you’re prepared on Twitter using hashtag #NATLPREP.
  3. Get involved with your local American Red Cross Chapter or train with a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT).

You don’t know when an emergency might occur. These simple steps will help you be prepared for the worst.

FEMA’s Ready.gov website provides detailed information on what may be most important to you and your family.  You can find specific information tailored to specifics needs such as people with disabilities, seniors, assisting children, business readiness, and even information for you pets. For more information, see Ready.gov

NOAA is working with FEMA and other agencies to help improve disaster readiness through campaigns such as National Preparedness Month. Through efforts such as the Weather-Ready Nation initiative, NOAA seeks to build community resilience in the face of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather events.


 

Bright Ideas Grants Deadline Quickly Approaching
September 3, 2014

Time is running out for teachers to apply for grants of up to $2,000 from Randolph Electric's Bright Ideas education grant program. Educators with creative ideas for hands-on classroom projects must submit their application by final deadline. Interested teachers can find the application, grant-writing tips, and more information on the Bright Ideas website at www.ncbrightideas.com. If you have any questions regarding the Bright Ideas Grant Program, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336-626-5177 or via email at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com. The last day to receive applications is September 20th!


 

Congratulations to our Bright Ideas Tar Heel Teacher of the Week!
September 3, 2014

Congratulations to our Bright Ideas Tar Heel Teacher of the Week!

Mrs. Jessica Thompson Orr
West Pine Elementary School
Seven Lakes, N.C.

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is proud to nominate Mrs. Jessica Thompson Orr of West Lake Elementary School for recognition on a statewide level. Mrs. Orr’s Bright Ideas project “Stomp Out Bullying” teaches relationship-building skills that create a more cohesive environment at school and will serve students well into their adult lives.

This innovative project helps 21st century learners in grades three through five battle bullying behaviors by learning about friendship skills, social skills, and bystander skills. Adults at the school trained to respond to bullying reports quickly and effectively.

Mrs. Orr and her project was recognized Saturday, Aug. 30 during the radio broadcast of the UNC vs. Liberty football game. Mrs. Orr and three guests will also receive tickets to a UNC football game.

North Carolina’s electric cooperatives make possible the Tar Heel Teacher of the Week and Bright Ideas education grant programs in support of education and local communities. Only 26 exceptional North Carolina teachers will be recognized as Teachers of the Week during this school year. For more information about Randolph Electric, click here. For more information about the co-ops’ commitment to community, click here.

Congratulations, again, to Mrs. Jessica Thompson Orr, our Tar Heel Teacher of the Week!


 

REMC Takes the Ice Bucket Challenge
August 22, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corp. in Asheboro, NC, took the Ice Bucket challenge Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014, which can be seen here: http://on.fb.me/1l0wUhA. 

REMC's Energy Services Consultant, Michael Trent, was challenged by a 7 & 8-year old football team from the youth football program he manages. In turn, Michael challenged CEO Dale Lambert, as well as the rest of the senior staff members, to do the same. Here is the link to Micheal's video: http://on.fb.me/1zbCRJH.

Since "Community Commitment" is one of the cooperative principles that guides us each day, our leadership team stepped up to help raise awareness about the disease. Fortunately, REMC has not had a direct connection to ALS, but one of our employees did have a brother-in-law pass away from the disease.

REMC is making a corporate pledge to the ALS Association, and other employees have given of their own funds to the organization as well. REMC recognizes that, as a community organization, it can do a lot of good to help spread the word about many worthy causes. The co-op regularly supports The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, The United Way, The U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots program, and the NC Jaycee Burn Center. It seemed only natural to join the masses in supporting The ALS Association in its efforts as well.


 

Members Report Scam Calls
August 7, 2014

Posing as representatives from Randolph EMC, potential thieves have attempted to scam members by calling to demand immediate payment of bills. With several reports of these types of encounters lately, REMC warns all of its members to not become a victim of this crime.

The scammers claim that electric service will be disconnected unless the bill is paid immediately. REMC will notify its members when payment has not been received and if disconnection of their electric service is pending. The cooperative's member service representatives do not demand immediate payment, but can take payments over the phone when necessary.

Though the most recent calls were reported from our Spanish-speaking members, all of REMC's members should be aware of the possibility of being scammed. If you have questions or concerns about a phone call from someone claiming to be a Randolph Electric employee, report the suspicious activity to the cooperative by calling 1-800-672-8212.

Members should never feel threatened or coerced by someone claiming to be with REMC. If a member is uncomfortable, they should hang up, call their local office, and ask that another representative handle the matter.


 

Play it Safe- Outdoor Grilling Safety
August 5, 2014

There’s nothing quite like grilling on a long summer day, especially if there’s something to celebrate, like Labor Day. In fact, Labor Day is the third most popular day of the year to grill right after the Fourth of July and Memorial Day. Don’t become complacent as you fire up your grill those last few times this summer.

Gas grills accounted for an annual average of 7,200 home fires from 2007-2011, and charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were responsible for an annual average of 1,400 home fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Follow these safety tips to keep your remaining summer days safe.

General Tips:

  • Never use grills in a house, garage or other enclosed area; this is a serious fire hazard.
  • Place your grill away from your home, deck railings, eaves or low hanging branches.
  • Before using your grill, make sure you have read the owner’s manual.
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat from the grill.
  • Never leave your grill unattended, and keep children and pets at least 3 feet away from the grill space.
  • Remain alert when grilling. If you are tired or have been drinking alcohol, you shouldn’t grill.
  • Keep flammable materials away from your grill at all times.

Gas Grills:

  • If using a gas grill, check for propane leaks before igniting.
  • Be sure the lid to your gas grill is open before igniting.
  • If a flame goes out on a gas grill, wait 15 minutes to re-light to allow any propane in the air to dissipate.
  • If you smell a gas leak while you are cooking, back away and call the fire department.
  • When you have finished using the grill, turn the gas off at the tank.

Charcoal Grills:

  • If using igniter fluid, be sure to keep it away from children and away from heat.
  • When using charcoal, be sure your coals are completely cool before disposing of them, and when you dispose of them, put them in a metal container. Never dump hot coals in a trash can.

 

Have you changed phone numbers?
July 25, 2014

For the best service, update your account with any number that you might use to report an outage, and while you’re at it, make sure your email address is correct, too. Please take the time to update your information online at www.RandolphEMC.com or give us a quick call at 1-800-672-8212. This is one added way we can improve communication with our members!


 

Play-it-Safe: Water Safety
July 7, 2014

Lakes, pools, and the ocean – they’re all perfect places to cool off during the summer’s heat. Keep the danger out of your cool retreat by heeding a few safety warnings this summer.

Before boating, always tell someone where you are going, who you will be with and when you are expecting to return. Make sure that each person in the boat wears a U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket. Wearing a life jacket in a boat is just as important as wearing a seatbelt in a car. Keep a fully charged fire extinguisher on the boat at all times, and teach all passengers how to use it. Bring all of the gear that you may need, including a flashlight, batteries, a map, flares, sunscreen and a first aid kit. Keep anything that needs to be protected in a watertight pouch or a container that will float. Always test your boat lights before leaving the dock, even if you plan to return before dark, because an equipment malfunction or weather change could cause a change in your plans. Sudden wind shifts, lightning flashes and choppy water can all be signs of a brewing storm; bring a portable radio on the boat with you to check weather reports.  

Swimming, whether in a lake, pool or the ocean, is another good way to stay cool in the summer, but safety should always be the first priority. Only swim in supervised areas and read and obey all rules and posted signs. Never swim alone. If you are not a strong swimmer, use a U.S. Coast Guard approved floatation device to assist you. Get out of the water if there is a threat of a storm because lightning can travel through water and strike a human. Always enter the water feet first unless the area is clearly marked for diving. If you are swimming at the beach, be mindful of rip currents, especially near piers and jetties where permanent ones can form. If you are caught in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore until you are out of the current and then swim to shore. Raise attention to yourself if you do not feel you can make it back to shore. Most importantly, stay calm and don’t fight the current.

Beat the heat in the water this summer, but don’t put yourself at risk. Exercise caution to make the most of your time at the swimming hole of your choice.


 

Educators, be an early bird!
June 9, 2014

Bright Ideas Early Bird Deadline: Aug. 15

Randolph Electric is accepting Bright Ideas grant applications from educators, and now is a great time to apply: All teachers who apply by the early bird deadline of Aug. 15 will be entered to win one of five $100 gift cards! Bright Ideas grants fund creative learning projects in K-12 classrooms. The final deadline to apply is Sept. 20th. For more information or to start your application, visit www.NCBrightIdeas.com or contact Lauren Ingold at Randolph EMC at 336-625-5177 ext. 2338.


 

Randolph Electric's Annual Meeting Set for June 20th
June 9, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation will celebrate its 76th annual meeting of the membership Friday, June 20, 2014, at Southwestern Randolph High School. The doors will open at 5:30 for members to register and enjoy free homemade ice cream, various informational displays, and live high-voltage line safety demonstrations, along with some special presentations. The AshBreeze Band will provide live entertainment from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m., and Magic by David will provide entertainment for children 12 and under during the business meeting.

The business meeting will begin at 7:00 p.m. with the theme, “Powering Communities, Empowering Members.” The cooperative will highlight some of its community contributions and Randolph EMC Board President Bob Wright and Chief Executive Officer Dale Lambert will give the cooperative’s business report for 2013. Following the business meeting, the co-op will hold drawings for registered members to win various door prizes, including cash and bill credits, gift cards, bicycles of all sizes, small appliances and Seagrove pottery.

"We are proud to have served our members for 76 years and look forward to continuing to provide outstanding electric service and benefits to our community for years to come," said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "Members of Randolph EMC still enjoy the same benefits members enjoyed in 1938, including being an owner of the company, voting for members to represent them on the co-op’s governing board of directors, and receiving patronage capital disbursements, to name a few.”

This year, the Randolph Electric Membership Corporation board authorized a general retirement of $2 million, with this year’s estate retirements estimated at $350,000—a total of more than $2.3 million. This retirement will return the remainder of patronage capital from 1990, 44 percent of 1991 and 54 percent of 2013’s patronage capital.

Putting money back into members’ pockets is just one unique difference that sets Randolph Electric apart from investor-owned utilities. In just the last three years, Randolph Electric has returned over $8.5 million to its members. That’s a significant amount of money that has flowed back to our members and back into the local economy in the five counties we serve.

The cooperative’s charitable organization, People Helping People (PHP), will also be featured at the event. PHP is a program that allows members to round up their electric bills to the nearest dollar each month to donate to other members in need of financial support due to extreme hardship. Members’ contributions average around 50 cents per month and are tax-deductible.

Members who sign up to participate in Randolph EMC’s People Helping People program for at least 24 months will be entered to win a 2006 Chevrolet Colorado truck that has been retired from the REMC fleet. The drawing for the vehicle will be held on December 19, 2014.

Randolph EMC invites all members to attend the annual meeting on June 20th to celebrate with their electric cooperative!


 

REMC Retires More Than $2.3 million Back to Members
June 3, 2014

Capital credits are a unique benefit for members of a cooperative. This year, the Randolph Electric Membership Corporation board authorized a general retirement of 2 million dollars, with this year’s estate retirements estimated at 350,000 dollars. That’s a total of more than 2.3 million dollars that’s flowing back to our members and into the local economy in the five counties we serve. This retirement will return the remainder of patronage capital from 1990, 44 percent of 1991 and 54 percent of 2013’s patronage capital. Putting money back into members’ pockets is just one unique difference that sets Randolph Electric apart from investor-owned utilities.

As a cooperative business, Randolph Electric doesn’t earn profits. Instead, any revenues remaining after all expenses have been paid each year are considered “margins” that are returned to the members after being used for a period of years as capital to help finance major long-term reliability projects including substations and power lines and poles.

Each year, the Board of Directors decides on a capital credits retirement based on the financial health of the cooperative. The amount of capital credits members earn in a given year is based upon the amount of capital they contribute to the cooperative through payment of their monthly bills in a formula that compares each member’s ratio of usage to the rest of the co-op. The more electric service a member buys, the greater their capital credits allocation. Capital credits are a continuous cycle: the cooperative collects for current needs to deliver reliable electricity while returning funds collected in previous years. This helps offset the need to borrow funds, thereby helping keep your electricity rates lower.

In the last three years, Randolph Electric has returned over $8.5 million to its members.  These are significant dollars and demonstrates how the cooperative business model that was established more than 75 years ago at Randolph EMC, is just as vibrant and as it was then.   Capital credit checks will be mailed out to members in early June. If the amount is less than $20, REMC will issue the refund as a bill credit.


 

Preparing for Hurricane Season Starts Now
June 2, 2014

North Carolinians are threatened by hurricanes and other tropical systems year after year, and residents from the coast to the mountains have experienced damage and despair during hurricane seasons past. That’s why we’re urging you to prepare now for this hurricane season, which starts on June 1 and runs through November. Find out what you can do to stay safe before, during and after a storm.

Before:

  • Prune trees and bushes to reduce the risk of flying debris. Never attempt to trim trees near a power line; this is a task for trained professionals. If you see trees that may be too close to a power line, contact your electric cooperative to let them know.
  • Secure all outdoor items that could blow away, like patio furniture, grills and toys.
  • Be sure to make an emergency action plan with details about how family members can get in touch with each other. This plan should also include a meeting spot where family members can reunite if separated during a storm.
  • Build an emergency kit that includes: one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, three days’ worth of non-perishable food, a manual can opener, flashlights with extra batteries, a first aid kit with prescription medications, a battery-powered radio and local maps.
  • Fuel your cars, and get gas for your gas-powered generator if you have one. If you plan to operate a generator in the event of an outage, have a qualified, licensed electrician connect the generator to your home’s main electrical supply. Power from generators can backfeed along power lines and electrocute anyone who comes into contact with them.

During:

  • Follow hurricane progress reports using your battery-operated radio.
  • Avoid windows and glass doors and keep curtains and blinds closed. Take refuge in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level.
  • If evacuation is necessary, leave as soon as possible, unplug all appliances, take your emergency kit, blankets and sleeping bags, and lock up your home.

After:

  • Make sure the storm has completely passed before going outside. Continue to monitor your news source.
  • Only drive if necessary and if you do go out, watch out for debris, power lines, flooded areas, and other damage.
  • Never touch a downed power lines. Because the lines could still be energized, report them immediately by calling your electric cooperative or 911.
  • If you have lost power, consider food safety guidelines before eating perishable food. In general, refrigerated food should be safe for up to four hours and frozen food should be safe for 24-48 hours without power. Find out more at foodsafety.gov.
  • Be aware of crews out clearing debris and restoring electricity. Remember, if you see a stopped emergency vehicle with flashing lights, state law requires you to move over one lane if possible or reduce speed.

Preparing for hurricane season will help you stay safe, potentially saving lives and money.  You cannot prevent hurricanes, but you can minimize damage to your home and injury to your family by gathering supplies, preparing your home and planning for a possible storm before the hurricane season starts.


 

Sports Scholarship Winners Announced
May 12, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation recently awarded two local students Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships to summer basketball camps at two of the state’s largest college campuses.

Molly Teel of Southwestern Randolph Middle School will attend the Wolfpack Women’s Basketball Camp at N.C. State University, and Noah Watkins of Charles W. McCrary Elementary School will attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, both on full scholarships from Randolph Electric. Molly is the daughter of Donna Hogan and Harold Teel of Asheboro. Noah is the son of Donnie and Abbey Watkins of Asheboro.


 

Youth Tour Winner Announced -- Congratulations to Tanner Henson
May 12, 2014

Tanner Henson, a rising junior Chatham Central High School in Bear Creek, was selected to represent Randolph Electric as the cooperative’s delegate for the 2014 NC Rural Electric Youth Tour in June. Tanner is the son of members Tami and Johnny Henson of Asheboro. Tanner will join up with nearly 1,500 high school students from 45 states to see sights like the U.S. Capitol, national monuments, Arlington Cemetery, the Smithsonian and Mt. Vernon. He will also have the opportunity to visit with North Carolina's congressional delegation. He will have the chance to learn more about U.S. government, American history and the cooperative business model.

We are so proud of all of the students who applied for this year’s Youth Tour. We know that Tanner will represent REMC well in Washington, D.C.!


 

Play It Safe—May
May 1, 2014

A world without electricity is hard to imagine. Lights flick on, cell phones ring, television channels flip... it’s all because of electricity. Even though we use it every day, most of us don’t think about it every day. That’s why May is recognized as National Electric Safety Month. This month gives us the opportunity to remind you of some basic precautions to take when dealing with electricity.

Let’s start with some general statistics. Every year, according to the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), electrical failures can cause 43,900 home fires, resulting in 438 deaths, 1,430 injuries and $1.47 billion in property damage.  Follow the guidelines below to avoid becoming a statistic.

Home: Our homes are supposed to be a safe haven-- a place to sleep, eat and live.

  • If small children are in the house, be sure to child proof your home. Place plastic caps on all unused outlets to prevent small fingers and curious hands from getting shocked.
  • Periodically check your home for damaged outlets, wires and plugs. These electrical hazards could start a fire if not maintained.
  • Make sure outlets outside, in the kitchen and in bathrooms are GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) specific. GFCI outlets constantly monitor electrical current within the circuit, and if the current is altered in anyway, the GFCI quickly interrupts the flow to prevent electrical shock.
  • Refrain from using extension cords in your home. If you absolutely have to use them, do not run them under carpet or rugs because you won’t be able to see if the cords incur damage.
  • Place lamps on even surfaces so they are less likely to tip over. Tipped lamps are a serious fire hazard.
  • Never overload an outlet. This means refraining from using a “splitter.”

Workplace: Whether you work in an office, at a home or in the field, you are using electricity, and safety precautions should be followed. According to ESFI, during the work day, a worker is hurt every 30 minutes so severely from electricity that it requires time off the job. Don’t let that be you.

  • If you see an unsafe situation, report it immediately. This keeps you and your coworkers safe.
  • Be aware of your surroundings, including the location and conditions of outlets and cords near your workspace.
  • Never work with equipment with the assumption that it is unplugged. It is better to be safe than sorry.
  • When unplugging something, pull from the base to prevent breaking the cord, which could result in electric shock.

No matter where you are, keep electrical safety in mind. Stay safe this month and every month.  


REMC Now Accepting Bright Ideas Grant Applications
April 1, 2014

Electric cooperatives across the state are celebrating a big milestone in 2014: our Bright Ideas education grant program, which provides funding to Tar Heel teachers for innovative learning projects, is turning 20 years old. Since 1994, the co-ops have worked to enhance education by engaging students in meaningful learning projects that encourage creative approaches. In the past two decades, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have contributed more than $9.1 million to teachers for 8,800 projects benefiting more than 1.6 million students.

Randolph Electric is now accepting applications for Bright Ideas education grants for the 2014-15 school year. Teachers in K-12 classrooms with creative ideas for hands-on learning projects are encouraged to apply for a grant up to $2,000.

Grant applications will be accepted April 1 through Sept. 19th. It could pay to apply early: all teachers who submit their applications by the early bird deadline of Aug. 15 will be entered into a drawing to win one of five $100 gift cards.

To apply, teachers must include a budget, explain the creative elements, implementation, goals and evaluation of the project, and have approval from the school principal. Applications will be judged in a competitive evaluation process, and judges will be on the lookout for projects that feature innovation and creativity. The application, grant-writing tips and examples of past winning proposals can be found at www.ncbrightideas.com.

If teachers have specific questions, please have them contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336.625.5177, ext. 2338 or via email at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

Play It Safe—April
April 1, 2014

The weather is warming up, and you may be anxious to breathe some life back into your yard after a winter away. After all, April showers really do bring May flowers. Follow these tips to stay safe while doing yard work:

Before You Start

  • Wear the appropriate clothing, including long pants and sleeves to protect your legs and arms. You should also wear closed toe shoes. If you are lifting a lot of heavy materials, you may want to wear steel toe shoes. Wearing gloves can prevent blisters and safety glasses can prevent debris from getting in your eyes.
  • Bug repellent and sunscreen can keep you from feeling the sting in the morning.
  • If you’re doing strenuous work, consider stretching your muscles for a few minutes before starting.

General

  • When using a ladder, be sure it is firmly on the ground and someone is holding it from the bottom. You should also watch out for overhead power lines when using a ladder. Stay 10 feet away from overhead power lines.
  • Before digging, make sure you call 811 to find out if there are utility lines buried where you plan to dig. It will keep you safe and save money and time. Call before you dig.
  • Yard work such as raking leaves can cause muscle soreness from the repetitive motion. Changing your position will help prevent stiffness and muscle fatigue.
  • When lifting heavy objects, lift with your legs (bending at your knees), not your back to prevent injury.
  • When pulling weeds, be careful of what you are pulling. It’s important to be familiar with the types of weeds you are pulling so that you can avoid things like poison ivy.
  • When picking up objects from the ground or dark areas, be mindful of where you are putting your hands. Critters like snakes and black widow spiders sometimes hide and don’t like being disturbed.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Mowing and Machinery

  • Before mowing the lawn, be sure you have removed rocks, sticks and other objects that can sling up and hurt someone.
  • Never stick your hands or feet under the lawn mower to clear it. The blades under the mower could still be spinning, which could cause serious injury.
  • Be careful putting gas in machinery. Always turn the equipment off and let it cool before filling it up with gas.
  • Always read the manufacturer’s instructions before operating tools or machinery. If you have to step away from machinery, be sure to turn it off.
  • If you are operating loud equipment, be sure to wear ear plugs.

It might seem like an extra step, but heeding safety precautions is well worth the time invested.


 

Sports Camp Scholarships Due March 31st
March 12, 2014

The deadline to apply for an all-expense paid scholarship from Randolph Electric to attend summer basketball camps at two of the state’s largest universities is quickly approaching.  Young men can apply to attend the June 21-25 Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Young ladies can apply to attend the June 23-26 Wolfpack Women's Basketball Camp at N.C. State University in Raleigh.

“These scholarships are a fantastic way for young athletes to experience life on a college campus and learn from mentors at their favorite NCAA athletic programs,” said Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator. “We’re proud to reward local students for their hard work by providing this opportunity to have fun, make new friends and develop skills that will help them excel on and off the court.”

Students who will be in sixth, seventh or eighth grade during the 2014-2015 school year can apply until March 31st. To download the Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarship application or find more information, please visit http://www.randolphemc.com/content/touchstone-energy-sports-camp-scholar.... If you have any questions, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336-625-5177 ext 2338.


 

Storm Restoration Update: March 10th @ 11:30 a.m.
March 10, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation reports that as of 11:30 a.m., Monday, March 10th, approximately 70 members of the electric cooperative remain without power. Crews worked steadily overnight, continuing to make progress on outage restoration from last week's ice storm.

“We have restored power the majority of our members that were affected by the storm,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “We have crews working on all active outages and appreciate everyone's patience as we restore power back to their homes and businesses.”

If you or someone in your household has special needs or relies on electric-powered life support equipment and you are without power, we encourage you to consider alternative arrangements until power can be restored.

"Randolph EMC is so grateful for the hard work and dedication of its full-time, contract and sister co-op crews, as well as our dispatchers in the office," said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer of REMC. "Our system really suffered some severe damage, and it was a concerted effort on everyone's part to restore power in record time," he added.

The cooperative urges members to remember that safety is top priority. With lines still on the ground, it is important to stay well away from them, even if they have been down for awhile. Never attempt to move a downed line or cut a tree from one.

Members who receive their electricity from Randolph EMC should still report all outages to 1-877-736-2633. For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Restores 100% of Outages
March 10, 2014

By 7:15 p.m. on Monday, March 10, power had been restored to all members of Randolph Electric Membership Corporation. Crews worked around the clock from the time the first call came in the early hours Friday morning to restore power to the 13,225 REMC members—42 percent of the cooperative's membership—who were without power because of the ice storm that hit portions of central North Carolina.

Northern Randolph and Alamance Counties reported the largest number of outages. Broken poles and spans of wire taken down by toppled trees and broken cross arms littered the cooperative’s rural territory. Crews spent much of their time in the Grays Chapel, Staley and Snow Camp regions of the system.

According to Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations for Randolph EMC, "The dividing line between rain and ice cut right through our territory. Areas to the north were in much worse shape than those in the southern parts. Considering the damage that we saw, I’m very pleased that we were able to replace so many broken poles and string up so many spans of wire in just four days. When you’re having to cut your way to every outage location, sometimes you wonder how it’ll ever get done,” he added.

Randolph EMC line crews were joined by teams of linemen from sister N.C. cooperatives Pee Dee EMC, Tri-County EMC, Rutherford EMC, South River EMC, Central EMC, and Union Power Cooperative. Contract linemen working for Lee Electrical Construction and Pike Electric also assisted in restoring power to REMC members. Randolph EMC’s contract tree-trimming crews with Lewis Tree also played a major role in helping to clear trees and debris for crews so that they could work.

"Randolph EMC is so grateful for the hard work and dedication of its full-time, contract and sister co-op crews, as well as our dispatchers, and employees answering the phone in the office," said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer of REMC. "Our system really suffered some severe damage, and it was a concerted effort on everyone's part to restore power in record time," he added.

The cooperative is very appreciative of members' patience as crews worked to repair power lines and poles. If members experience a power outage, it should be reported to the cooperative's outage hotline at 1-877-736-2633 (1-877-REMC-OFF). Dispatchers are available 24 hours a day to take outage calls. 


 

REMC Outage Restoration Update: Sunday, 4:30 p.m.
March 9, 2014

As of 4:30 p.m., approximately 1,200 members remain without electricity. All available crews are working diligently to repair numerous broken poles and downed lines from Friday’s ice storm.

"I’m very pleased with the progress we’ve made so far," said Dale Lambert, Randolph EMC’s Chief Executive Officer. "I’d like to thank the linemen who have worked around the clock for our members, as well as the staff taking care of all the logistics back at our offices—everyone is doing an outstanding job," he added.

“We appreciate our members’ patience and want them to know that even though they might not see crews working near their homes, we’re out in full force,” said Daniel Maness, Line Superintendent for Randolph EMC. In a major outage situation, power is restored in a sequence that energizes the largest number of people first. Circuits that feed power to homes start at a substation and can be miles away from your home.

The cooperative urges members to remember that safety is top priority. With lines still on the ground, it is important to stay well away from them, even if they have been down for awhile. Never attempt to move a downed line or cut a tree from one.

Members who receive their electricity from Randolph EMC should still report all outages to 1-877-736-2633. For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

8:30 Update: Sunday, March 9th
March 9, 2014

As of Sunday night at 8:30 p.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corp. crews are making steady progress restoring power to the remaining 792 members without electricity in the cooperative's hardest-hit areas. The storm system that ripped through the heavily-wooded areas of Alamance County, Randolph County and parts of Chatham on Thursday produced damaging ice that toppled trees onto lines, breaking poles and cross arms in the process. 

All available REMC crews, crews assisting from sister cooperatives and other contract electrical crews are focusing their efforts on rebuilding the damaged system. "Our crews have been hard at it since the first call came in Thursday," said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations for Randolph EMC. "All of the broken poles and downed lines around them really puts the job that they have to do in perspective. We have a great group of committed employees and contractors who have vowed not to stop until their job is done," he added.

If you are still without power and are using a portable generator, be sure the generator is located outside your house for proper ventilation. Remember to never touch a downed power line or do cleanup work from the storm near a downed power line.

Members who receive their electricity from Randolph EMC should still report all outages to 1-877-736-2633. For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Randolph Electric, Extra Crews Steadily Working Around the Clock to Restore Outages
March 8, 2014

Asheboro, N.C., March 8, 2014 —Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is reporting progress overnight in restoring outages to its members in Randolph, Alamance and Chatham Counties hit hardest by the ice storm that took place in the early morning hours of March 7.

Line crews from Randolph EMC, Pee Dee EMC, Tri-County EMC, Rutherford EMC, Lee Electric and Pike Electric, as well as tree-trimming crews from Lewis Tree worked steadily overnight and will continue to work today to restore power to 76 remaining outages affecting 3,600 members as of 9:30 a.m. Additional crews from Pike Electric arrived this morning to assist in restoration.

Downed lines and trees have impeded travel in many locations, making progress slow-going for crews. The cooperative is very appreciative of members' patience as linemen work to repair numerous broken power lines and poles.

As temperatures rise and members become more active Saturday, REMC urges the public avoid areas where utility crews are working and not to attempt to cut trees that could be in contact with a power line. All downed or low-hanging lines should be treated as “live” lines, and people should stay well away from them.

For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 members in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties.


 

Storm Update: Saturday, March 8th @ 3 p.m.
March 8, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is continuing to report progress in restoring outages to its members in Randolph, Alamance and Chatham Counties hit hardest by the ice storm that took place in the early morning hours of March 7.

As of 3 p.m. line crews from Randolph EMC, Pee Dee EMC, Tri-County EMC, Rutherford EMC, Lee Electric and Pike Electric, as well as tree-trimming crews from Lewis Tree are working steadily to restore power to 53 remaining outages affecting 5,800 members.

Downed lines and trees have impacted travel in many locations, making progress slow-going for crews. The cooperative is very appreciative of members' patience as linemen work to repair numerous broken power lines and poles.

"In addition, we are currently working on fixing a davit crossarm on a transmission line, which is affecting Staley and Snow Camp substations, circuits 1-8 and hope to re-energize part of the line soon," notes Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations."

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

7 p.m. Storm Outage Update
March 8, 2014

As of Saturday evening, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation continues to make progress with restoration efforts in areas hit hard by yesterday’s severe weather. At 7 p.m., the current number of outages is 60, affecting 2,000 members. Crews have fixed a davit crossarm on a transmission line, which impacted members served out of REMC’s Staley and Snow Camp substations. As a result, the number of outages in that area has decreased significantly.

"We're pleased about the progress that is being made across our system," said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations for Randolph EMC. "Having a network of co-ops and trusted contractors is priceless in an event like this. They all know that our number one priority is safety and immediately following is getting power restored," he added.

Although progress is being made, Randolph EMC stresses the importance of members remaining on alert for downed lines. If you are taking advantage of the warmer weekend temperatures, we’d like to remind you to never touch a downed power line; they can still be energized and therefore dangerous or even deadly. If you are cleaning up from the storm, do not attempt to cut trees that could be in contact with a power line. No one except a trained line technician should handle or be near a downed power line.

For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Working to Restore Power to Members Impacted by Ice Storm
March 7, 2014

Currently, Randolph Electric crews are working to restore power to nearly 9,525 members at this time. Nearly 74 outages, mainly in Chatham, Randolph and Alamance counties have been reported.

According to Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations for Randolph EMC, "Overnight, the majority of Randolph County experienced ice accumulations and very gusty winds which have brought down hundreds of trees into the roadway, multiple trees on homes, and extensive power outages."

To help restore power to members as quickly as possible, Randolph EMC line crews will receive support from sister N.C. cooperatives. The cooperative is very appreciative of members' patience as crews are working to repair power lines and poles.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Treat any downed power line as a “live” line, and do not get near them or attempt to drive over them.

For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Power Restoration Updates
March 7, 2014

As of 11:30 a.m., Randolph Electric is reporting 93 outages affecting more than 8,100 members. The majority of the outages are located in Randolph and Alamance Counties. To help restore power to members as quickly as possible, Randolph EMC line crews are receiving support from sister N.C. cooperatives and contract crews.

Because of the amount of rain that has fallen recently, heavily saturated soil makes trees more susceptible to falling, especially if they have weak root systems. This saturation, combined with wind and ice, increase chances of trees or tree limbs falling on power lines and causing outages.

"The amount of storm damage in our service territory, especially in Randolph County, is quite extensive and our crew members are working with Department of Transportation (DOT) to help clear debris from the road," states Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "We greatly appreciate everyone's cooperation and patience and are grateful for the support from our sister cooperatives and contract crews."

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

If you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Storm Update: Friday, March 7th at 3:30 p.m.
March 7, 2014

As of Friday, March 7th at 3:30 p.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corp. has 73 outages impacting approximately 7,000 members. The most heavily affected areas are in the Grays Chapel and Staley areas of Randolph County and the Snow Camp area in Alamance County. Other outages are scattered across the rest of REMC’s service territory. Additional crews have joined REMC linemen and linemen from sister co-ops and contract crews will work around the clock repairing downed lines and replacing broken poles.

The public's safety and the safety of linemen are top priority. Please remember to stay well away from downed or sagging power lines, as they may still be energized. Also, those using back-up generators should be sure that their equipment is properly grounded and is located in a well-ventilated area away from air intakes to the house. Generators should never be refueled while running and should never be plugged into a wall outlet because it poses an electrocution risk for utility workers. Randolph EMC has several storm safety tips available on its website at www.RandolphEMC.com.

"Randolph Electric understands the hardships our members are facing during these outages and thanks everyone for their patience while we labor to restore the power," notes Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "REMC serves primarily rural areas, and rural areas have lots of trees. The combination of extremely wet soil from heavy rain today and earlier in the week and the ice and wind from this storm is really a recipe for disaster.”

If you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Storm Outage Update: Friday, March 7th @ 8:30 p.m.
March 7, 2014

REMC crews are working diligently to restore power to members as quickly and safely as possible after a destructive ice storm moved through the area on Thursday evening and Friday morning. REMC crews have reported extensive damage across the system, especially in areas Grays Chapel in Randolph County. As of 8:30 p.m. there are 68 outages impacting 5,400 members.

Randolph Electric would like to thank its members for their patience and understanding during this difficult time. It would also like to extend special thanks to the outside crew members who are aiding the cooperative and its members during this time of need.

"So many times, it has been Randolph EMC sending crews to help other co-ops in need. If I've said it once, I've said it a thousand times: 'It could just as easily be REMC crews that need help getting the lights back on," said Dale Lambert, REMC's Chief Executive Officer. "That time has come, and we're beyond grateful for these teams of linemen who have come to help and who have a commitment to our members that's as strong as our own crews'."

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

If you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). For the latest updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

REMC Actively Monitoring Winter Weather
March 6, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring winter weather advisories issued for its service area in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties.

Rain and freezing rain are expected across our service territories from Thursday afternoon through Friday morning.  Some of the latest models show an increased possibility of more icing than originally predicted. However, it must be stressed that there is still a lot of uncertainty with this event and that a 1-2 degree temperature shift in either direction could alter the forecast considerably.  

With the possibility of increased power outages, Randolph EMC line technician crews and customer service staff are on stand-by in preparation to respond at any time of the day or night should power outages occur.  Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should report outages at 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633).

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. For updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 members in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties.­


 

Play It Safe-- March
March 3, 2014

Play It Safe-- March

We bet you’ve heard a lot of myths about power lines, like “If birds sit on power lines, they must be safe to touch.” Not true. And we’re here to tell you why.

Myth: Birds land on power lines, so that must mean the lines are safe to touch.

Fact:  It is NEVER safe to touch a power line. Birds can sit on power lines without incurring electric shock because they are only touching one power line at a time. Electricity runs in a circuit, or a loop. If a bird were to touch another power line, a pole or the ground, a fatal dose of electricity would travel through the bird. A person would likely have some sort of path to the ground for electricity to complete its “loop,” and that’s why it is never safe for a person to try to touch a power line

Myth: As long as my ladder isn’t metal, I can touch and get close to power lines without getting hurt.

Fact: Even wooden ladders will conduct electricity because they complete a path to the ground and they often hold moisture and metal parts. Be sure to always keep ladders at least 10 feet away from power lines.

Myth: I’m not using a ladder to trim tree limbs near a power line, so I’m safe. In fact, I’m actually trimming the limbs so they are clear of power lines.

Fact: All it takes is for one tree limb to accidently touch a power line for electricity to have a nice path through the limb, down your pruning tool and into you. Your electric cooperative has a tree trimming program, but if you ever notice branches that seem to be near a power line, call your electric cooperative, and they will take care of it.  

Myth: The power line is down, but I’m not touching it, so I am safe.

Fact: Power lines can remain “live” even if they have fallen to the ground. This means electricity can travel through the ground, especially if it is wet, and into you. You do not have to be touching the wire to be electrocuted. Stay at least 300 feet away from downed power lines.

Myth: If I’m in my car, I can’t be electrocuted from a downed wire.

Fact: Although you are safer in your car than on the ground, you should still be careful. Never drive over downed wires as they can become entangled in your car. If you have to get out of the car, be sure to jump with both feet together (like a rabbit) so you are not touching the car and ground at the same time. Continue to “hop” away from the scene.

Myth: I can let my children play around power lines.

Fact: It is good practice to teach your children to stay away from any electrical equipment. You never know when equipment could be damaged as a result of vandals, careless landscapers or for other reasons. Keep an eye on your children, and if they decide to fly kites, they should always keep kites away from power lines.


 

REMC Prepared for Winter Weather Response
March 3, 2014

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring winter weather advisories issued for its service area in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties.

While the National Weather Service expects the amount of sleet and freezing rain from this storm to be less than originally predicted, wintry precipitation accumulation and wind gusts as high as 35 mph are favorable conditions for power outages. Randolph EMC line technician crews and customer service staff are on stand-by in preparation to respond at any time of the day or night should power outages occur.  

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should report outages at 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized.

For updates on power outage progress, visit REMC’s online Outage Map at www.RandolphEMC.com. The cooperative also posts status reports and safety information on its Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Youth Tour Applications Due March 15th
February 21, 2014

Rising high school juniors and seniors in our area have a unique opportunity for an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC, this summer where they can see democracy in action, meet their representatives, visit historical sites, and learn more about how cooperative businesses work. In early April, one application will be selected for an all expense paid trip to Washington D.C. the week of June 14-20, 2014.

In addition, the student chosen will have the opportunity to compete for the $2,500 Gwyn B. Price Youth Tour scholarship and the $2,000 Katie Bunch Memorial Scholarship. These scholarships were established by the North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives Volunteers' Committee to aid young people who have limited financial resources and have exhibited outstanding scholastic and leadership abilities in their quest for a college education.

To learn more about Youth Tour and download an application, visit www.RandolphEMC.com. under the Community Section dropdown. Then check out YouthTour.coop to get highlights from the 2013 tour and learn more about what's in store for 2014. You can also follow updates on Facebook page by searching for North Carolina Youth Tour on Facebook. For more information or questions about Youth Tour, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com or 336-625-5177 ext. 2338.


 

Basketball Camp Scholarships Available
February 19, 2014

Calling all basketball fans! North Carolina's Touchstone Energy cooperatives are once again offering middle-school students the chance to win a full scholarship to summer basketball camp. Young men can apply to attend the June 21-25 Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Young ladies can apply to attend the June 23-26 Wolfpack Women's Basketball Camp at N.C. State University in Raleigh.

Students who will be in sixth, seventh or eighth grade during the 2014-2015 school year can apply until March 31st. To download the Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarship application or find more information, please visit http://www.randolphemc.com/content/touchstone-energy-sports-camp-scholar.... If you have any questions, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336-625-5177 ext 2338.


 

Minimal Impact from Winter Storm Pax
February 14, 2014

Asheboro, N.C., February 13, 2014 — Randolph Electric Membership Corporation had very minimal impact from winter storm Pax, with only a few members reporting outages in Moore county. The threat of ice-laden tree branches and power lines didn’t materialize as predicted, so REMC’s storm center remained quiet for the duration of the wintry precipitation. 

“We feel like we’ve dodged a bullet with this storm,” said Jay Albright, District Vice President for Randolph EMC. “We are so fortunate that the temperature stayed colder overnight, resulting in heavier snow and sleet and less ice accumulation. This winter storm could have easily left homes and businesses without power for multiple days. We prepared for that scenario, but are very thankful that it didn't come to that,” Albright added.

Staff and crews will remain on alert to respond to any outage situations that could occur overnight. Any member who receives electric service from Randolph EMC should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage.


 

REMC Prepared for Weather Related Outages
February 11, 2014

Asheboro, N.C., February 11, 2014 — Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring winter storm forecasts and making preparations to respond in the event of outages associated with the predicted wintry precipitation. The cooperative urges members to take precautions now to stay warm and safe in their homes in the event of power outages associated with this storm. Randolph EMC line technician crews and customer service staff will remain on stand-by in preparation to respond to reported outages at any time of the day or night.

"After briefings with the National Weather Service today, we’re more confident that we will see both snow and ice impact our service territory," said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “Winter storm Pax has the potential to cause widespread outages, depending on the amount of ice that accumulates. We’re hopeful that this event will not be as significant as is being predicted, but just in case, we have our storm plan in place and we’ll be ready to restore electricity as quickly and safely as possible,” he added.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage.

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 members in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties.­


 

REMC Prepared for Winter Storm
February 10, 2014

Asheboro, N.C., February 10, 2014 — Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is making advance preparations for the possibility of power outages associated with the winter weather advisories issued for its service area in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties. As wintry precipitation accumulates, conditions may become favorable for power outages. Randolph EMC line technician crews and customer service staff will be on stand-by in preparation to respond at any time of the day or night should power outages occur.

"We’re cautiously monitoring this system, and we’ll remain vigilant through this weather event, ready to respond if needed," said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations.

To prepare for winter weather event, be sure to have the proper supplies handy. Flashlights and extra batteries are essential to your winter weather supply kit. Include a battery-powered radio in your supply kit so that you can listen to the weather forecast during a power outage. Be sure to keep extra clothes and blankets in your emergency kit to stay warm and remember to have a first aid kit handy. Charge cell phones and consider keeping a corded phone in your home, as cordless phones will not work if the power is out. If you have special health needs, take those into consideration when making preparations as well.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage.


 

Play It Safe-- February
February 3, 2014

Appliances make our everyday lives a bit simpler, but that doesn’t mean they are without hazards. Be sure to keep these safety tips in mind when using appliances.

General

  • Always follow an appliance’s instructions to be sure that you are using it correctly and safely.
  • Check to see if your appliances have been approved by an independent testing laboratory such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL).
  • Check your appliances occasionally for damages, looking for breaks in the power cords, plugs, or connectors.

Water

  • Be sure that outlets in bathrooms, kitchens or other places near water are GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) specific. GFCI outlets constantly monitor electrical current within the circuit, and if the current is altered in anyway, the GFCI quickly interrupts the flow to prevent electrical shock.
  • If an appliance is plugged in and falls in water, be sure the circuit is shut off before grabbing the appliance.
  • It is important that your hands are dry before touching appliances to avoid electrical shock.
  • Never have electrical appliances such as radios, TVs, or hairdryers near a sink or bath tub.

Outlets

  • It may feel like there are never enough outlets, but refrain from using outlet “splitters” or running too many extension cords.  It can damage your home’s electrical system or cause a fire.
  • If your appliance is damaged, you should either take it to a certified repair center or just throw it away and buy a new one. Never continue using it for safety reasons.
  • Unplug small appliances such as curling irons, hair dryers, toasters, irons, etc. when not in use to conserve energy and reduce fire hazards. Make a routine of checking all electrical appliances before going to bed to make sure they are unplugged.

Cords

  • Keep cords neat and tucked away to avoid tripping or having pets chew on them.
  • Don’t run cords under rugs and carpets. This is not only a fire hazard, but it also prevents you from being able to see what condition the cords are in.
  • Never run cords over heated appliances such as toasters or stoves. This is a serious fire hazard.

Being mindful of these safety tips will ensure that you can continue enjoying the conveniences that appliances have to offer.


 

National Email Scam Hitting Inboxes
January 29, 2014

A nationwide email scam is targeting utility customers, including electric cooperative members, by sending bogus invoices directing them to a virus-infected site.

The scam emails claim to be from PG&E Energy, an electric and gas utility in San Francisco. Atmos Energy, a natural gas utility in Dallas, might alternatively be listed as the email source.

One Randolph Electric member reported receiving a fraudulent billing message that said she owed a past-due balance to PG&E and provided a hyperlink to pay it. Fortunately, she realized the email was a fake, deleted it immediately, and gave us a call.

Reports about similar emails say the link takes a person to a site that infects their device with malware, which is known to scan through computers searching for personal information.

REMC advises members to ignore these emails and other suspicious requests for personal information, such as bank account numbers, credit card numbers, and user names and passwords. Members are also advised to delete those emails immediately without clicking through any links the message might contain.

These reports of email scams come on the heels of a number of fraudulent calls that have been reported in recent weeks. It is important for consumers to pay close attention to any calls or emails they receive regarding billing issues.

“Any time members have a question of whether or not an email or phone call regarding their electric bill is legitimate, they should call the utility to verify,” said Jill Vanness, director of communications for Randolph EMC.

“Randolph Electric does attempt to collect on past-due balances via phone call; however, the cooperative will never ask a member to make their payment in any specific way,” she added.

Members who encounter any type of scam are asked to contact the cooperative at 1-800-672-8212. 


 

REMC Prepared for Winter Weather Response
January 28, 2014

Asheboro, N.C., January 28, 2014 — Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is currently monitoring winter weather advisories issued for its service area in Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham, and Alamance counties. As wintry precipitation accumulates, conditions may become favorable for power outages. Randolph EMC line technician crews and customer service staff are on stand-by in preparation to respond at any time of the day or night should power outages occur.  

“We’ve been monitoring this system all throughout the day, and although we don’t anticipate a great deal of trouble in our service territory, we’ll remain vigilant through this weather event, ready to respond if needed,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations.

“We’re also concerned about how hard our sister cooperatives closer to the coast might be hit,” he added. “We’ll likely be called upon to send a group of line technicians to help with restoration efforts in those areas, but we’ll only do that once we’re positive we’re in the clear here at home,” Mabe said.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage. As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.  


 

Recent Scam Alert
January 24, 2014

Randolph EMC is warning its members and the general public of fraudulent calls from individuals posing as bill collectors for Randolph Electric Membership Corporation.

The caller tells the member that he is calling on behalf of Randolph EMC and that their bill is due now. Unless paid immediately, the member's electricity will be disconnected. The caller then suggests that the consumer pay the balance due using a “Green Dot MoneyPak” card, which is a prepaid card that can be purchased from various nearby merchants. This is a fraud. The caller may give instruction to purchase the prepaid card and then provides a phone number to call to pay via the card after the card is purchased. Members have indicated that the phone number calling shows up on caller ID as a Utah number with an 801 area code, and that the caller has a thick foreign accent. At least one member that we know of has fallen victim to the scam, paying around $200 with a Green Dot MoneyPak card.

Randolph Electric urges its members to be aware of this scam and asks that members share this information with family and friends to help put a stop to it. Anyone receiving suspicious collection calls should report those calls to their electric service provider directly. Randolph EMC members should call (336) 625-5177.


 

REMC Responds Quickly to Weather Related Outages
January 7, 2014

With the extreme arctic weather impacting the Triad area on Monday and Tuesday, Randolph Electric members experienced a few isolated power outages early Tuesday morning. A combination of gusty winds and cold temperatures overnight caused outages for more than 1,100 members in the New Hope area of Asheboro, and more than 500 residents in the Seven Lakes and Dowd Road areas in Moore County. Despite the bitter cold working conditions, REMC linemen worked throughout the night to repair broken line connectors, restoring power as quickly as possible so that families could stay warm in their homes. Overall, there were 1,731 members impacted by the event system wide.

“Randolph Electric prepared for the extreme cold temperatures by keeping additional crews on alert in both our Asheboro and Robbins districts to minimize outage times as much as possible,” said Jay Albright, REMC’s District Vice President. "Our team of employees did a great job to restore the outages quickly despite the cold temperatures.  We will continue to have additional linemen on standby, ready to respond again tonight if necessary,” he added.

In addition, Randolph Electric was prepared for the increased energy load that comes with the extreme cold. Although the cooperative was nowhere near reaching its available capacity, the forecasted low temperatures set a record all-time system peak demand of 153 Megawatts around 7 a.m. on Tuesday morning, which exceeds the highest amount noted on record of 142 Megawatts reported on January 17, 2009.

"During this time of extreme cold weather, we encourage members to remain safe, and comfortable," notes Fred Smith, Vice President of Member and Public Relations. "Keep warm without cranking up the heat by layering clothing (wool is warmest), drinking hot beverages, and using extra blankets when sleeping. Additionally check your vents to make sure they are open and not blocked by furniture to ease airflow.  Also check windows and doors for drafts and seal any cracks. These tips can make your home more comfortable and save you money."

As always, Randolph Electric warns the public that downed power lines can be extremely dangerous—even deadly. Stay far away any time you see a downed line and report it as quickly as possible to Randolph Electric by calling any local office or our toll-free member service number, 1-877-736-2633.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage. For the fastest response time, members should be sure the cooperative has their current phone numbers on file so that the outage management system can immediately notify dispatchers of the situation. To update or add home and cell phone numbers, members can call either the Asheboro or Robbins offices or visit www.RandolphEMC.com to update online.


 

Youth Tour Applications Now Available From Randolph Electric
January 6, 2014

Rising high school juniors and seniors in our area have a unique opportunity for an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC, this summer where they can see democracy in action, meet their representatives, visit historical sites, and learn more about how cooperative businesses work. In early April, one application will be selected for an all expense paid trip to Washington D.C. the week of June 14-20, 2014.

In addition, the student chosen will have the opportunity to compete for the $2,500 Gwyn B. Price Youth Tour scholarship and the $2,000 Katie Bunch Memorial Scholarship. These scholarships were established by the North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives Volunteers' Committee to aid young people who have limited financial resources and have exhibited outstanding scholastic and leadership abilities in their quest for a college education.

To learn more about Youth Tour and download an application, visit www.RandolphEMC.com. under the Community Section dropdown. Then check out YouthTour.coop to get highlights from the 2013 tour and learn more about what's in store for 2014. You can also follow updates on Facebook page by searching for North Carolina Youth Tour on Facebook. For more information or questions about Youth Tour, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com or 336-625-5177 ext. 2338.


 

REMC Prepared for Cold Weather Response
January 6, 2014

With arctic temperatures and gusty winds expected in central North Carolina this week, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation has extra line technician crews on stand-by, ready to respond quickly to any outages that might occur.

“We’re keeping additional crews on alert in both our Asheboro and Robbins districts to minimize outage times as much as possible,” said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “We understand the inconvenience of a power outage at any time, but with such extreme temperatures anticipated this week, its important that our members know that we’re ready to respond at any time of the day or night,” he added.

The cooperative is also prepared for the increased energy load that comes with the extreme cold, but urges members to be prepared as well. The forecasted low temperatures will likely cause increased energy usage for members with electric heat—even those who leave their thermostats at a set temperature. Heating systems must work harder and longer to maintain the set temperatures when the weather is this cold, potentially causing bills to be higher than expected.

Any member who receives electric service from Randolph Electric should call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633) to report an outage. For the fastest response time, members should be sure the cooperative has their current phone numbers on file so that the outage management system can immediately notify dispatchers of the situation. To update or add home and cell phone numbers, members can call either the Asheboro or Robbins offices or visit www.RandolphEMC.com to update online. 

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.  

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 members in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties.­


 

Play it Safe—January
January 3, 2014

January brings a new year, many resolutions, and often times cold, snowy or icy weather. Although the blanket of winter creates a stunning picture, it can also cause power outages. Generators, however, can provide a saving grace during power outages, but it is important to remember some safety precautions if you use one this winter.

General Safety

  • Be sure to always read the manufacturer’s instructions before operating your generator. This ensures it runs properly and safely.
  • Never leave a running generator unattended. Turn it off before leaving home and at night while you sleep.
  • Gas-powered generators produce deadly carbon-monoxide fumes that are invisible and odorless. When you buy your generator, buy a battery-operated carbon-monoxide alarm to warn of such danger.
  • Keep generators outside and away from windows to prevent carbon-monoxide fumes from seeping into the building. The best place to put generators is out of direct exposure to rain and snow in a well ventilated area, and not in the garage.
  • Parts of the generator can become hot and burn you. Be mindful of parts such as the muffler when around the generator to prevent being burned.
  • Keep children away from the generator at all times.  

Generators and Power

  • Be sure to use a heavy-duty, outdoor appropriate extension cord running from your generator to your appliances.
  • Always hire an electrician to connect your generator directly into your home’s wiring.  If not done properly, it could back feed into utility lines, causing severe danger for utility crews working on power lines.
  • Make sure you follow the manufacturer’s instructions on grounding the generator.
  • Never use the generator to operate too many appliances at one time; be sure to check the manufacturer’s instructions about how much load your generator can handle. Use appliances only as needed and turn the generator off when no appliances are plugged in.

We certainly hope you won’t have a need for a generator this winter, but if you do, stay safe. Use our outage reporting number to let us know of any outages 1.877.736.2633, and know that we’ll work hard to get the power back on to you as quickly as possible.


 

Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships for 2014
January 1, 2014

Calling all basketball fans! North Carolina's Touchstone Energy cooperatives are once again offering middle-school students the chance to win a full scholarship to summer basketball camp. Young men can apply to attend the June 21-25 Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Young ladies can apply to attend the June 23-26 Wolfpack Women's Basketball Camp at N.C. State University in Raleigh.

Students who will be in sixth, seventh or eighth grade during the 2014-2015 school year can apply starting January 2nd. To download the Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarship application or find more information, please visit http://www.randolphemc.com/content/touchstone-energy-sports-camp-scholar.... If you have any questions, please contact Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336-625-5177 ext 2338.


 

Play it Safe—December
December 2, 2013

Santa Claus isn’t the only one traveling during the holiday season; many of you will be adding points to frequent flier miles, hitting the roads, or “walking over the river and through the woods.” Wherever you are traveling and however you choose to get there, it is important to keep a few safety tips in mind.

Home: Leaving your house makes it vulnerable to break-ins. Take precautions so you can come back to your house the way you left it. 

  • Be sure to hold your mail and newspapers while you are gone. This is free to do and only takes a phone call. A pile of mail or newspapers is a dead give away for a vacant house.
  • Unplug your electronics to save energy and increase electrical safety.
  • Set your lights on timers. If you do this, your house looks more lived in, discouraging burglars.
  • Turn off the main water supply to your house. It can save you thousands of dollars by preventing leaks that may be caused by frozen water in the pipes. Even if the pipes aren’t in danger of freezing, a leak can happen, and without someone there to notice it, serious damage can occur.
  • Turn your thermostat down (around 50°F is recommended) while you are gone to save energy, but don’t turn your heat completely off. This may cause pipes to freeze.
  • Although you may want to share your excitement about vacation and the holidays with the world via social media, you should refrain from doing so. It becomes an announcement that you aren’t home and your house is up for grabs. Be smart about what you post.
  • Of course, always make sure your windows and doors are locked.

Airport: Flying can be stressful and hectic during the holidays; however, there are some things you can do to have a safe, smooth trip.

  • Don’t leave a portable GPS in your car during long-term parking at the airport. It leaves a convenient map to your house.
  • Make sure your children know to not make jokes or false threats about security.
  • Listen to airport officials.
  • Be familiar with rules of the airport.
  • Pack necessary items in your carry on in case your luggage is lost.
  • Leave your valuables at home so you don’t draw attention to yourself.
  • Be sure that you have all appropriate IDs and copies of your IDs.
  • Don’t wrap gifts until you arrive at your destination. If you get pulled for a search, TSA agents will open the packages.

Car: Winter weather can cause new challenges while driving. You should always be cautious when snow falls or freezing temperatures occur. Remember: “ Ice and snow, take it slow, or just don’t go.”

  • Make sure your tire treads are not worn down. During winter weather, traction is important. You can even purchase snow tires, made for snowy, icy roads.
  • Be sure that your window wipers are working appropriately for maximum vision. To increase visibility, you can also put anti-icing windshield washing fluid in your car.
  • Make sure your brakes are working effectively.
  • Be on the lookout for black ice. It is a real danger, especially in shady spots, on bridges, on ramps and intersections.
  • Always remember to drive with caution, especially if roads are bad. In winter weather, make sure to keep a safe distance from other cars. It takes longer to stop on slippery roads.
  • Pay attention to weather reports to learn more about driving conditions.
  • To stay in control when driving on slippery or snowy roads, don’t use cruise control, avoid sudden movements, and brake smoothly, not abruptly.

Best wishes for a safe and happy holiday season!


 

RANDOLPH EMC AWARDS $10,000 TO LOCAL TEACHERS FOR “BRIGHT IDEAS”
November 22, 2013

Randolph Electric honored teachers and celebrated innovation in education in November by awarding $10,000 in Bright Ideas grants to educators in Asheboro City, Moore, Montgomery and Randolph counties.  The grants will fund nine projects that will touch the lives of more than 1,500 local students.

“We’re thrilled to award these dedicated educators with Bright Ideas grants,” said Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at Randolph Electric. “Their creative projects will no doubt help students reach their full potential and spark higher interest in learning for years to come.”

Bright Ideas education grants, sponsored by Randolph Electric and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives, provide resources to Tar Heel teachers for innovative, hands-on, classroom projects that would not otherwise be funded.

North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are expected to award nearly $600,000 in Bright Ideas grant funding to educators statewide this school year. Since 1994, the Bright Ideas program has awarded more than $8.5 million to teachers across the state for 8,300 projects benefiting more than 1.5 million North Carolina students.

Bright Ideas grant applications are collected each year through mid-September, and winning proposals are selected in a competitive evaluation process by a panel of judges. The application process will reopen for interested teachers in April 2014.

A panel of retired educators representing Randolph, Moore and Montgomery County Schools carefully reviewed and discussed each application before deciding on these final awards. Randolph Electric's 2013 grant winners are listed below:

Mrs. Cynthia Albert, North Moore High School, $2,000
“Moore Potters” will promote art achievement, culture and engagement by offering students the opportunity to discover the history found within their neighborhood, participate in the process of creating with clay, and connect it to the global scene via potters from around the world who have settled in the area.

Mr. Lance Barber, West End Elementary, $350
“Mathematical Badminton” will provide students the opportunity to illustrate in a physical education setting how math and science are an integral part of the game Badminton. Students will learn how the motion of the shuttle (birdie) obeys Newton’s laws of motion. 

Mrs. Charlotte Burgess, Randleman Middle School, $479
“Strategies-Marking the Path to Success” will encourage children to enjoy the process of reading. By providing each student with a monthly magazine of their own, students will have specific lessons structured around the stories in the magazines and will be allowed to mark in the book, write in the margins and highlight and underline important words and thoughts.

Mrs. Brooke Davis, Asheboro High School/Zoo School, $2,000
"Community Garden at the Zoo" will allow students to design, build and tend to a community garden on site at the NC Zoo/AHS Zoo School. In addition, school gardens teach students where their food comes from and encourages good eating practices by fostering an appreciation for natural foods.

Mrs. Rausie Hobson, Eastern Randolph High School, $769
“Seeing More Clearly” will integrate  visual art and technology to allow students to see, in three dimension, objects that are delicate, rare, small, or difficult to see. Utilizing a digital camera, Smart Board and creative thinking, students will understand important visual concepts and then make presentations to present to their peers.

Mrs. Jennifer Hare, East Middle School, $1,219
“What's Up Montgomery” will allow eighth grade Honors English students the opportunity to utilize reading, writing, research, speaking, listening, and language skills integrated with social studies skills to create and present a multi-media project on the history of Montgomery County. 

Mrs. Sharon Frost, Guy B. Teachy Elementary School, $1,030
“Once Upon a Time” allows students to deepen their comprehension strategies and creative development through the study of fairy tales with the use of Reader's Theater. Using this understanding, the students will write their own scripts for new stories. After creating these scripts, students will perform their stories for other students, parents and community members.

Ms. Jessica Thompson Orr, West Pine Elementary School, $1,606.35
“Stomp Out Bullying” will allow twenty first century learners to understand the relationships between self and others.  Students in grades three through five will battle bullying behaviors by learning specific friendship skills, social skills, and bystander skills. Adults at the school will be trained to respond to bullying reports quickly and effectively.

Ms. Cassandra Salabak, Charles McCrary Elementary, $546.65
“Marvelous Mustangs- Boys Only Book Club” is a continuation of a successful pilot project completed last year, which encourages young boys that reading is fun. Continuing the program, third, fourth, and fifth grade boys will be partnered with adult males to help with self-esteem and to improve reading skills. 

To find out more information about the Bright Ideas grant program, visit (www.RandolphEMC.com or the Bright Ideas website at www.ncbrightideas.com). Become a fan of “Bright Ideas Education” on Facebook to receive regularly updated news about the program. 


Scam Alert
November 22, 2013

Earlier today a member received a phone call stating they were to purchase a pre-paid card at CVS or Walgreens for $200. After purchasing the card the member was asked to call 1- 800- 744- 7879 and to speak with a supervisor named Mendez or else their power was going to be disconnected within 30 minutes. If you should hear from other members about a similar situation, please remind them that REMC will never ask a member to make a payment in a specific way.

Randolph Electric urges its members to be aware of this scam and asks that members share this information with family and friends to help put a stop to it. Anyone receiving suspicious collection calls should report those calls to their electric service provider directly. Randolph EMC members should call (336) 625-5177.


 

Shop Local with your Co-op Connections Cards and Support Small Business Saturday
November 20, 2013

Randolph Electric is always supporting small and independent businesses in our area. Founded by American Express in 2010, Small Business Saturday is a day dedicated to supporting small businesses across the country. This day is celebrated every year on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. This year, Small Business Saturday is on November 30th. Whether traveling to a local town, shopping, eating out or purchasing the last minute items before company arrives, utilizing your Co-op Connections card at a local business can help trim your holiday spending. Visit Randolph Electric's Co-op Connections page at www.RandolphEMC.com and see what deals you can find with local businesses! Thank you for supporting local merchants in our area.


 

Play It Safe— Holiday Kitchen Safety
November 4, 2013

The kitchen is a popular place, especially during the holidays. Between the turkey, stuffing, casseroles and pies, you’re likely to spend a great deal of time there during the next couple of months. It’s important to remember the kitchen isn’t all sugar; there’s some spice, too. Keep the following safety tips in mind this holiday season.

General Safety:

  • The best place to start in the kitchen is at the sink; washing your hands before and after handling foods, especially raw meat, keeps you and your family healthy.
  • Prevent slips and falls by wiping up spills immediately.
  • Never, ever leave cooking foods unattended.

Children:

  • Never leave children unattended in the kitchen. It’s not just about cookies in the cookie jar; there are too many hot pans that could topple and sharp knives in arm’s reach.
  • Put locks on cabinets and ovens to divert the curious hands of your youngest helpers.

 Burn and Fire Prevention:

  • Watch out for steam burns. Be careful when lifting lids off of pots or opening things that have been microwaved.
  • Put food gently into boiling water or hot oil to prevent it from splashing and burning you.
  • Always turn pot handles inward, toward the back of the stove, so they are not as easy to knock over and burn you.
  • Use a dry pot holder when handling hot pots and pans. A wet one will not keep the heat at bay.
  • Always keep a fire extinguisher in your kitchen and make sure you and your family members know how to use it before an emergency.
  • When you are finished cooking, make sure the oven and stove top are turned off.

Electrical:

  • Make sure your hands are dry when plugging in appliances.
  • Always unplug appliances after you are finished using them.
  • GFCI outlets should be installed in your kitchen to help prevent shortages and potential electrocutions.

Knife Safety:

  • When cutting or peeling, always do so away from yourself.
  • Never dump knives in sudsy dishwater. You won’t be able to see them amongst the suds, and they could cut you.

Turkey Fryer:

If you are planning on frying a turkey this holiday season, consider this--the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) says deep fryers cause an average of five deaths, 60 injuries, and more than $15 million in property damage each year.

  • If too much oil is in the fryer pot, hot oil may spill out when the turkey is lowered in, causing flare ups in the burner. Read directions to know how much oil should be used.
  • Be sure that your turkey is fully thawed and dry before frying it. Frozen or partially frozen turkeys can cause oil spills and fires. Lower the turkey slowly to prevent spills.
  • Place the fryer outside away from structures and other flammable materials.
  • Finally, never leave the fryer unattended. The oil temperature will continue to rise until combustion occurs.

Following these safety tips will hopefully result in more time spent eating and enjoying family and fewer accidents. Happy Thanksgiving!


 

Randolph Electric Celebrates Co-op Month with Members
October 3, 2013

Every October, cooperatives are recognized for the qualities that make the business model unique: local democratic control, commitment to supporting the communities they serve and improving quality of life, special benefits and services, and the return of margins (the co-op term for profits) back to members in the form of capital credits.

Randolph Electric is proud to be a part of America’s cooperative network, which employs more than 850,000 people. Across the nation, 29,000 co-ops and credit unions generate $74 billion in annual wages and nearly $500 billion in revenue.

Cooperatives have an obligation to provide reliable, affordable, and safe electricity, but we take that a step further. At Randolph Electric, we also have a responsibility to support our members, enrich schools, and enhance our communities.

In the 1930's electric cooperatives were formed because rural communities were struggling for lack of investment. Neighbors banded together and lit up the countryside when no one else would. That’s what we celebrate each October. Perhaps most important of all, co-ops are independent and community-focused. Co-ops help drive local economic development, fund scholarships, support local charities, and work to make life better in areas they serve—the heart of the cooperative difference

In celebration of this special month, when members visit one of REMC's offices in Asheboro or Robbins, they can pick up a snack and enter to win various prizes.


 

Randolph Electric Urges Members to be Aware of Scam
October 1, 2013

This morning, a Randolph Electric member reported to the Asheboro office that he had received a call from a person posing as a Randolph Electric employee stating that the account would be disconnected if not paid immediately. The caller attempted to collect the amount via credit card. The member did not provide the number, but called Randolph Electric instead to report the scam. 

So far, we have only learned that the number — (803) 900-8681 — is located in central South Carolina. This is the only call we have received about this scam so far.

Randolph Electric urges its members to be aware of this scam and asks that members share this information with family and friends to help put a stop to it. Anyone receiving suspicious collection calls should report those calls to their electric service provider directly. Randolph EMC members should call (336) 625-5177.


 

October Play it Safe – Wall Outlets
October 1, 2013

Wall outlets are the bridge from electricity to appliances; they make it possible for our lamps, cell phone chargers, coffee makers and televisions to run. Most of the time, we don’t even think about how that happens or whether there are any dangers associated with it, but there are a few things you can look out for to keep your home and your family safe.

  • Make sure to regularly check your outlets for damages. All wires should be covered and plates should be tightened down. If the plates are cracked, they should be replaced immediately.
  • If your outlets are warm to the touch or discolored, contact a qualified electrician to determine the cause.
  • If you have an older home, consider upgrading your outlets to the safer, three-prong style that is grounded. If you don’t have three-prong outlets, be careful to never force a three-prong plug into a two-slot outlet.
  • GFCI outlets should be installed in any area where there is water, such as kitchens, pools, crawl spaces and bathrooms. These outlets monitor electricity flowing in a circuit and trip the circuit if an imbalance is detected, protecting people from electric shock.
  • If you have young children or grandchildren in your home, cover your outlets with plastic child safety plugs to keep little fingers and objects out of tempting outlets.  
  • Don’t plug too many electrical devices into an outlet; this increases the risk of fire. If a power strip is filling up, transfer some items to another outlet. Turn the switch to a power strip off when appliances are not in use.
  • You can also save energy if electrical devices not in use are unplugged. Pay special attention to phone chargers, television sets and computers. These will use up energy even if they are turned off.
  • Always plug larger appliances, like refrigerators and washing machines, directly into outlets, not power strips.
  • When unplugging an item, make sure to grab the base of the plug. Pulling the cord itself can cause damage to both the cord and the outlet.

Pay attention to your outlets. If you notice a potential problem in your home, arrange for it to be fixed immediately to prevent accident or injury.


 

Randolph EMC Warns Members of Ongoing Utility Scam
September 13, 2013

Thieves posing as electric utility representatives continue to prey on unsuspecting consumers across the country.  Randolph Electric urges its members to be aware of this scam and never provide anyone who calls you with personal or account information.

A typical scam scenario happens as follows: A member receives an unsolicited phone call from someone who falsely claims to be a representative of the electric cooperative. That person tells the member that his or her service will be disconnected if the member does not make an immediate payment to the cooperative. In some cases, the scammer insists on receiving payment within an hour and instructs the member to either purchase a prepaid debit card and provide the details of that debit card or turn over credit card information.

Scammers were previously targeting mainly Spanish speaking members, but they have branched out and are now targeting members from many different backgrounds.

Randolph Electric would never contact a member to obtain account or personal information. If you doubt the identity of someone claiming to represent the cooperative, hang up and call the cooperative’s office using the phone number listed on a bill or another official document.

Randolph Electric urges its members to be aware of this scam and asks that members share this information with family and friends to help put a stop to it. Anyone receiving suspicious collection calls should report those calls to their electric service provider directly. Randolph EMC members should call (336) 625-5177.


 

Congratulations to our Bright Ideas Tar Heel Teacher of the Week!
August 29, 2013

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation, based in Asheboro, nominated Mrs. Kidd and sponsored her latest Bright Ideas education grant project, “FFA Promotes Healthy Living.” This innovative project developed an obstacle course/nature trail that allowed students from agriculture classes to learn about the trees around the school while also learning about physical fitness. This project was used in conjunction with a program that reaches 300 elementary school students and has a large impact on students of all ages for years to come.

Mrs. Kidd and her project will be recognized Thursday, Aug. 29 during the radio broadcast of the UNC vs. South Carolina football game. Mrs. Kidd will also receive 4 tickets to a UNC football game and plaque commemorating her achievement.

North Carolina’s electric cooperatives make possible the Tar Heel Teacher of the Week and Bright Ideas education grant programs in support of education and local communities. Only 12 exceptional North Carolina teachers were recognized as Teachers of the Week this fall. For more information about Randolph EMC, click here. For more information about the co-ops’ commitment to community, click here.

Congratulations to Mrs. Amy Kidd, our Tar Heel Teacher of the Week – thanks for all you do!                          


 

Deadline Approaching for Bright Ideas Grants
August 23, 2013

Time is running out for teachers to apply for grants of up to $2,000 from Randolph Electric's Bright Ideas education grant program. Educators with creative ideas for hands-on classroom projects must submit their application by Friday, September 20th. Interested teachers can find the application, grant-writing tips, and more information on the Bright Ideas website at www.ncbrightideas.com.

“Since 1994, the Bright Ideas education grant program has provided more than $8.5 million for 8,300 projects benefitting more than 1.5 million students in North Carolina,” said Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. “North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are committed to local communities, and we believe there’s no better way to contribute than by investing in the education of our youth.”

Randolph Electric and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have allocated nearly $600,000 to give to educators across the state during the 2013-2014 school year.

The grants will be awarded in November for projects in all grade levels and all disciplines, including math, science, language, art, English and history. Last year, Randolph Electric contributed $10,000 to local classrooms through Bright Ideas grants.

The Bright Ideas grant applications require an outline of the proposed project, a detailed budget and a description of the benefit to students. Applicants are encouraged to highlight the innovative, creative elements of the project and to proofread carefully.

North Carolina’s electric cooperatives serve more than 2.5 million people in 93 of the state’s 100 counties.


 

Holly Spangler Attends N.C. State Basketball Camp on Scholarship
August 9, 2013

Holly Spangler, a student at Uwharrie Middle School, attended the Wes Moore Wolfpack Women’s Basketball Camp at N.C. State in Raleigh Aug. 1-4 on a full scholarship. Holly is the daughter of Jonathan and Michelle Spangler of Asheboro. Her grandparents are Darrell and Eugenia Johnson of Asheboro and Mary Spangler and the late James Spangler of Thomasville. 

“Holly is an outstanding student, athlete and community member, and Randolph EMC is pleased to provide her this unique opportunity to experience life on a college campus and to receive instruction from ACC coaches and student-athletes,” said Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. “These camps develop fundamental skills that will help young athletes excel both on and off the court. We were delighted to have her represent our co-op at camp.”

Holly and 25 other N.C. State camp scholarship winners were selected based on an application that included academics, extracurricular activities and an essay. At camp, students stayed on campus in a dorm and worked directly with Wolfpack women’s players and coaches.

This is the 10th year that the state’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, including Randolph EMC, have sent young women to camp at N.C. State. The cooperatives have also provided scholarships for young men to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp in Chapel Hill for the past eight years. More than 50 students from across the state won full Touchstone Energy scholarships to attend basketball camps this summer. The scholarships are sponsored by North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives and are available to middle-school students every year.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship program is part of the electric cooperatives’ ongoing commitment to North Carolina communities.


 

Back to School Safety
August 2, 2013

The hot, lazy days of summer have flown by and are being replaced by hours in the classroom -- it’s back to school for many. While school is typically a safe environment for your children to learn, there are still dangers. Encourage your older children to read through these tips, and use the information provided to have a discussion with your younger kids. 

Electricity Safety 

Electricity can be exciting and interesting to learn about, but it is just important that kids learn about electrical safety. Remind your children of the following tips:

  • Even if the other kids are doing it, do not throw shoes onto power lines, and definitely don’t try to get them off of the lines.
  • Never poke pencils, paperclips or other items into electrical outlets, even if you think the outlet isn’t working.
  • Make sure your hands and the area around you are dry before plugging something in. This is especially important in science labs where there are usually several sets of sinks, an eye wash, chemicals, etc.
  • When unplugging things from an electrical outlet, always hold the plastic base to pull the plug out. Never yank it out by the cord.

School Bus Safety

School buses are a convenient and reliable way to get kids to and from school; however, accidents do happen. There were 1,236 fatal school transportation-related crashes from 2001 to 2010, according to statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).  Heed the following school bus safety warnings.

  • While walking to the bus stop, stay on the sidewalk; never run. If there isn’t a sidewalk, be sure to walk on the left facing traffic.
  • When waiting for the bus to arrive, make sure to stand away from the road in a safe place.
  • If you have to cross the road to get to the bus, make sure you look both ways before crossing.
  • Be sure to stay seated and facing forward on the bus.
  • Be respectful by keeping your hands to yourself, speaking quietly, and keeping the aisles clear.
  • No matter how boring the bus ride may seem, don’t throw balls or paper airplanes in the bus, and don’t play with emergency exits. These can be dangerous distractions to the driver.
  • When getting off the bus, make sure the driver can see you by walking in front of the bus, stay out of the “Danger Zone” (10 feet away from the bus), and look for cars when crossing the street.

Other Safety Tips

  • After you’ve exited the bus, don’t talk to strangers and definitely don’t get in the car with anyone you don’t know. Be sure to tell your parent or the bus driver if a stranger bothers you or tries to pick you up.
  • Parents, be careful about having your child’s name on his or her clothing or backpack. Strangers can learn your child’s name this way and use it to gain the trust of your child.
  • If you can’t pick up your child from school, make sure your child knows who will pick him/her up to avoid confusion. This also lets your child know who it is ok to go home with.

Keep these tips in mind to have a safe and productive school year.


 

Teachers: Apply Now for Bright Ideas Grants and a Chance to Win $500
July 26, 2013

The Bright Ideas education grant program, which awards funding to N.C. teachers for innovative classroom-based projects, is accepting applications. North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, including Randolph Electric, have allocated nearly $600,000 to distribute to teachers across the state during the 2013-2014 school year. The final deadline to apply is September 20, and educators who apply by Friday, Aug. 16 will be entered into a drawing for a $500 Visa gift card.

“We’re proud to support educators whose hard work, dedication and enthusiasm impact the lives of so many young people,” said Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. “They give so much to their students, and through the grants and the early-bird prize, we’re honored to give something back. We hope this year even more teachers will apply by August 16 and have a chance to win the $500 Visa gift card.” Classroom teachers are eligible to apply for Bright Ideas grants of up to $10,000 for creative projects that would otherwise go unfunded. Educators can learn about the Bright Ideas program and apply online at www.ncbrightideas.com. Last year, Randolph Electric contributed $10,000 2012-2013 to local classrooms through Bright Ideas grants.

All teachers who apply by the Aug. 16 early-bird deadline will be entered to win the $500 Visa gift card. The winner of the gift card will be selected at random and recognized on the Bright Ideas website and Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ncbrightideas. Since the Bright Ideas program began in 1994, the electric cooperatives have awarded more than $8.5 million in grant money to North Carolina's teachers to sponsor more than 8,300 projects benefiting more than 1.5 million students.

“Randolph Electric is committed to education and our community, and we believe there’s no better way to contribute than by partnering with teachers to create new opportunities for our future leaders,” Vanness said.

The Bright Ideas education grant program is part of the electric cooperatives’ ongoing commitment to North Carolina communities. North Carolina’s electric cooperatives serve more than 2.5 million people in 93 of the state’s 100 counties.


 

Randolph EMC Sends Braxton Luther to Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp
July 17, 2013

A local student shot hoops and ran drills with college coaches and athletes during basketball camp at the University of North Carolina, thanks to a scholarship from Randolph Electric Membership Corporation.

Braxton Luther, a rising 7th grade student at Southeastern Randolph Middle School, won a Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship to attend the June 15-19 Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp in Chapel Hill. Braxton is the son of Keith and Michelle Luther of Asheboro. His grandparents are Mike and Betty Cox and Melvin and Jewell Luther all of Asheboro. 

“Braxton is an outstanding student, athlete and community member, and Randolph EMC is pleased to offer students like him the opportunity to experience life on a college campus and to learn from some of the NCAA’s best year after year,” said Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at the cooperative.

Scholarship winners were selected by a panel of judges who reviewed an application that included academics, extracurricular activities and an essay. At camp, athletes stayed in dorms and worked directly with Roy Williams, his coaching staff, and current and former Tar Heel basketball players on fundamental skills that will help the campers excel on and off the court.

This is the eighth year that North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, including Randolph EMC, have sponsored young men to attend basketball camp at UNC. North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives have also provided scholarships for young women to attend basketball camp at N.C. State University in Raleigh for the past 10 years. More than 50 students statewide won scholarships to attend basketball camps on the two college campuses this summer. The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship program is part of the electric cooperatives’ ongoing commitment to North Carolina communities.


 

Pool and Electrical Safety
July 1, 2013

The heat of summer brings long days, cool drinks and lots of time spent by the swimming pool. While kids and adults of all ages enjoy playing and splashing in the water, pools can present many dangers.  In the past 13 years, there have been 60 deaths and nearly 50 incidents of serious shock due to electrical hazards in and around swimming pools, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.  Electrocution is a potential threat, but you can prevent a hazardous situation by taking a few cautious steps.  Follow these tips to keep your family safe this summer:

  • Avoid the pool and stay inside before, during and after thunderstorms.
  • Know the location of all electrical switches for pool equipment and lights in case they need to be shut off in an emergency.  
  • If you have a backyard pool, hire a licensed electrician to check that your pool’s wiring is up to code and poses no safety hazards.
  • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) should be installed on all outlets that power outdoor equipment, including pools. A GFCI detects any imbalance in the flow of electricity and will immediately turn off power if such an imbalance is detected.
  • Refrain from using cord-connected appliances around the pool; use battery-operated appliances instead.
  • Keep all electrical appliances and equipment at least five feet from the pool, as required by the National Electrical Code.  If the appliance happens to fall or be pulled into the water, unplug it from the power source before reaching for it.
  • Dry off completely before touching any electrical equipment near the pool.
  • If you have a small plastic or inflatable kiddie pool, be sure that overhead electrical lines do not pass over the pool.  Keep the pool at least 25 feet away from power lines.
  • Post an emergency plan within clear view of anyone using the pool. The plan should include basic pool emergency information and information about what to do in the event of electrical shock.

Whether you and your kids will be splashing in a small plastic pool or head out to the neighborhood pool, be sure to take these precautions in order to avoid electrocution.  Combing electricity and water can be extremely dangerous and potentially life-threatening.  If someone in the water is experiencing an electrical shock, immediately turn off the power and then call 9-1-1.


 

Power 100% Restored to Randolph EMC Members
June 16, 2013

By 6:40 p.m. Sunday, power had been restored to all members of Randolph Electric Membership Corporation. Crews worked around the clock from the time the first call came in Thursday evening to restore power to the 11,300 REMC members—about one-third of the cooperative's membership—who were without power because of a fast-moving, but damaging summer storm.
 
Moore and Montgomery Counties reported the largest number of outages. Montgomery County suffered the most damage, with broken poles and spans of wire taken down by toppled trees and broken cross arms in the very heavily wooded area near Lake Tillery. Some Moore County members were without power while Duke Energy Progress crews worked to repair a storm-damaged transmission line that served the cooperative's Eastwood substation. In addition, one of the cooperative's large feeder lines carrying power out of the Robbins substation was damaged and took some time to repair because it spanned across a wide rural area. Members in Randolph, Chatham and Alamance Counties also experienced outages, though they were more scattered across the territory, rather than concentrated in one area as in Montgomery and Moore Counties.
 
According to Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Engineering and Operations for Randolph EMC, "This storm hit our entire service territory pretty hard and fast. We serve primarily rural areas, and rural areas have lots of trees. The combination of extremely wet soil from heavy rain earlier in the week and the straight line winds from this storm was really a recipe for disaster.”
 
Randolph EMC line crews were joined by teams of linemen from sister N.C. cooperatives Lumbee River EMC, Rutherford EMC  and Pee Dee EMC. Contract linemen working for Lee Electrical Construction from North and South Carolina and Power Delivery Association crews from Georgia also assisted in restoring power to REMC members. 
 
"Randolph EMC is so grateful for the hard work and dedication of its full-time, contract and sister co-op crews, as well as our dispatchers in the office," said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer of REMC. "Our system really suffered some severe damage, and it was a concerted effort on everyone's part to restore power in record time," he added.
 
The cooperative is very appreciative of members' patience as crews worked to repair power lines and poles. If members experience a power outage, it should be reported to the cooperative's outage hotline at 1-877-736-2633 (1-877-REMC-OFF). Dispatchers are available 24 hours a day to take outage calls. 


 

Storm Update: Saturday 10:00 a.m.
June 15, 2013

As of Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corp. crews are making steady progress restoring power to the remaining estimated 1,100 members without electricity in the cooperative's hard-hit Montgomery County area. The storm system that ripped through the heavily-wooded region on Thursday produced damaging straight-line winds that toppled trees onto lines, breaking poles and cross arms in the process. 
 
All available REMC crews, crews assisting from sister cooperatives and other contract electrical crews are focusing their efforts on rebuilding the damaged system. "Our crews have been hard at it since the first call came in Thursday," said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Operations and Engineering for Randolph EMC. "All of the broken poles and downed lines around them really puts the job that they have to do in perspective. We have a great group of committed employees and contractors who have vowed not to stop until their job is done," he added. The cooperative has also brought in additional crews from Rutherford Electric Membership Corp., located in Forest City, N.C. to aide in restoration efforts.
 
Employees in REMC's engineering department are currently working to correct an issue with the co-op's public online outage mapping system, which has a delay in clearing restored outages from the map. The number of outages showing on the map are just slightly higher than the true number remaining, but not by a large amount. Engineers hope to have the reporting issue resolved as soon as possible. The online map will still be available for estimated outage numbers and REMC will periodically post updated information on its website at www.RandolphEMC.com.


 

Storm Update: Saturday 2:00 p.m.
June 15, 2013

As of Saturday at 2:00 p.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corp. crews continue to make progress restoring power to members in Montgomery County, which suffered the most damage from Thursday's storm. At this time, just over 650 members remain without power, down from 11,300 at the peak of the storm. Most of these outages are in the vicinity of River Road in Montgomery County, near Lake Tillery, as this area is heavily wooded and had the greatest number of trees on lines and broken poles. Others are concentrated in the vicinity of Dairy Road in Troy.
 
"We're pleased about the progress that is being made all across our system" said Dennis Mabe, Vice President of Operations and Engineering for Randolph EMC. "Having a network of co-ops and trusted contractors is priceless in an event like this. They all know that our number one priority is safety and immediately following is getting power restored," he added. The cooperative called in additional crews as early as Thursday evening to assist in restoration efforts.
 
"So many times, it has been Randolph EMC sending crews to help other co-ops in need. If I've said it once, I've said it a thousand times: 'It could just as easily be REMC crews that need help getting the lights back on," said Dale Lambert, REMC's Chief Executive Officer. "That time has come, and we're beyond grateful for these teams of linemen who have come to help and who have a commitment to our members that's as strong as our own crews'." 
 
Although progress is being made, the Randolph EMC stresses the importance of members remaining on alert for downed lines. High-voltage power lines are extremely dangerous and may still be energized even though they are on the ground. Everyone should stay well away from downed or sagging lines.
 
REMC's online outage map is still showing outage numbers as being just slightly higher than the true number remaining. The online map will still be available for estimated outage numbers and REMC will continue to periodically post updated information on its website at www.RandolphEMC.com.


 

Storm Update: 7:00 p.m.
June 15, 2013

As of Saturday at 7:00 p.m., Randolph Electric Membership Corp. has 922 members without power. Additional crews from Pee Dee Electric Membership Corp., headquartered in Wadesboro, N.C., are joining REMC linemen and linemen from sister co-ops and contract crews to work around the clock repairing downed lines and replacing broken poles. REMC's online outage map is reporting normally at this time.

The public's safety and the safety of linemen are top priority. Please remember to stay well away from downed or sagging power lines, as they may still be energized. Also, those using back-up generators should be sure that their equipment is properly grounded and is located in a well-ventilated area away from air intakes to the house. Generators should never be refueled while running and should never be plugged into a wall outlet because it poses an electrocution risk for utility workers. Randolph EMC has several storm safety tips available on its website at www.RandolphEMC.com.


 

Storm Update: REMC Crews Working to Restore Power to Members
June 14, 2013

REMC crews are working around the clock to restore power to members as quickly and safely as possible after destructive storms moved through the area on Thursday evening. REMC crews have reported extensive damage across the system, especially in areas of Montgomery County.

To help restore power back to our members as quickly as possible, REMC has called in its Lee Electrical Construction contract crews, as well as Lee crews from the Brunswick, N.C. and Charleston, S.C. areas for help rebuilding the damaged parts of our system. We will also be receiving assistance from contract and full-time crews from Lumbee River EMC and Power Delivery Association contractors from Georgia. 

Randolph Electric will continue to provide updates on our website to our members. If you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation
Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 electric customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance Counties.


 

Storm Damage Updates for Friday June 14th
June 14, 2013

As of Friday afternoon, Randolph Electric Membership Cooperative continues to make progress with restoration efforts in areas hit hard by yesterday’s severe weather. The total number of outages across Randolph Electric's five county service territory is down to approximately 1,964 from nearly 11,300 at the storm’s peak. The area with the largest number of outages and most extensive pole damage remains in Montgomery County, specifically to the Liberty Hill Substation.

Due to the extensive damage, REMC has called in its Lee Electrical Construction contract crews, as well as Lee crews from the Brunswick, N.C. and Charleston, S.C. areas to help rebuild the damaged parts of our system. REMC will also be receiving assistance from contract and full-time crews from Lumbee River EMC and Power Delivery Association contractors from Georgia.

"The amount of storm damage in our service territory, especially in Montgomery County, is quite extensive and our crew members are working around the clock to make sure all power is resorted to our members safely," states Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "We greatly appreciate everyone's cooperation in this matter and grateful for the support from our sister cooperatives and contract crews."

Randolph Electric will continue to provide updates on our website to our members. If you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation
Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,200 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 electric customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance Counties.


 

Randolph Electric Working to Restore Power to Members After Storms
June 13, 2013

Crews from Randolph Electric Membership Corporation are currently working to restore power to  members as strong storms are moving through the area Thursday evening. Employees will remain on alert throughout the night to respond to any additional power outages that occur as a result of continuing high winds.

Because of the amount of rain that has fallen recently, heavily saturated soil makes trees more susceptible to falling, especially if they have weak root systems. This saturation, combined with high winds, increase chances of trees or tree limbs falling on power lines and causing outages.

If you experience a power problem or outage, call 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). Members may also view outage updates at www.RandolphEMC.com by clicking on the "Outage Map" link located in the upper right hand side of the screen.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are low or on the ground, as they could be energized. Care should be given not to approach line personnel as they work; their work is very dangerous and any distraction could cause an accident.   

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation
Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,100 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 electric customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance.


 

Randolph EMC Invites Members to Attend 75th Annual Meeting on June 21st
June 12, 2013

Asheboro, N.C., June, 2013—Randolph Electric Membership Corporation will celebrate its 75th annual meeting of the membership Friday, June 21, 2013, at Southwestern Randolph High School. The doors will open at 5:30 for members to register and enjoy homemade ice cream, various informational displays, and live high-voltage line safety demonstrations, along with some special presentations. Gospel group The Directors Trio will provide live entertainment from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m., and Fish the Magish will provide entertainment for children 12 and under during the business meeting.

The business meeting will begin at 7:00 p.m. with the theme, “Pride in Our Past, Progress in Our Future.” The cooperative will highlight some of its community contributions and Randolph EMC Board President Bob Wright and Chief Executive Officer Dale Lambert will give the cooperative’s business report for 2012. Following the business meeting, the co-op will hold drawings for registered members to win various door prizes, including cash and bill credits, bicycles of all sizes, small appliances, and Seagrove pottery.

"We are proud to have served our members for 75 years and look forward to continuing to provide outstanding electric service and benefits to our community for years to come," said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer.  "We invite our members to learn more about what Randolph Electric has in store for the future while celebrating 75 years of cooperative service."

Members of Randolph EMC still enjoy the same benefits members enjoyed in 1938, which include being an owner of the company, voting for members to represent them on the co-op’s governing board of directors, having a say in how the cooperative is operated, receiving patronage capital disbursements, and having access to a locally based, friendly staff who are interested in helping their member-owners.

The cooperative’s charitable organization, People Helping People (PHP), will also be featured at the event. PHP is a program that allows members to round up their electric bills to the nearest dollar each month to donate to other members in need of financial support due to unemployment, illness or other types of crises. Members’ contributions average around 50 cents per month and are tax-deductible.

All Randolph EMC members who sign up to participate in PHP before the end of June will be entered win a $250 bill credit. Sign-up forms are available at Randolph EMC’s offices and online at to www.RandolphEMC.com.

Randolph EMC invites all members to attend the annual meeting on June 21st to celebrate with their electric cooperative!

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,100 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation celebrates 75 years of service this year, from 1938-2013.


 

June Play-it-Safe: Hurricane Safety
June 3, 2013

Advancements in technology warn us of coming storms days in advance, but don’t wait until a hurricane forms to start preparing.  Hurricane season begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30 and, when these disasters strike, they pose serious threats to North Carolinians. True preparation for hurricane season starts now. Follow these tips to make sure that you, your family and your home stay safe this hurricane season. 

Before the Storm:

  • Have a family evacuation plan. Determine a safe site for your family to meet and include the safest route to an emergency shelter or other facility.
  • Locate important papers and documents and have them ready to take with you, should you need to evacuate. These items include drivers’ licenses, Social Security cards, proof of residence, insurance policies, wills, deeds, birth and marriage certificates and tax records.
  • Create an inventory of your personal belongings with videotape, photos or a written list. Make sure this inventory list is kept in a waterproof container.
  • Put together a disaster supply kit. Include a two-week supply of water, non-perishable food items, a first-aid kit, flashlights, a battery-operated radio, batteries and your prescription medications.
  • Fill your car with gas as soon as a storm is forecasted; do not wait.
  • Secure your home. Close storm shutters and lock up outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
  • Be sure to listen to the radio for updates on weather conditions. Know that a watch is issued when there is a threat of hurricane conditions within 24-36 hours and warnings are issued when hurricane conditions are expected in less than 24 hours.

During the Storm:

  • Follow hurricane progress reports on the television or radio. Be sure to have a battery-powered radio on hand in case the power goes out.
  • Avoid windows and glass doors and keep curtains and blinds closed. Take refuge in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level.
  • If evacuation is necessary, leave as soon as possible, unplug all appliances, take protective clothing, blankets and sleeping bags, and lock up your home.

After the Storm:

  • Make sure the storm has completely passed before going outside.
  • Never pick up or touch a downed power lines. Because the lines could still be energized, report them immediately by calling your electric cooperative or 911.
  • If your power is out for an extended period of time and your emergency situation requires the use of a generator, have a qualified, licensed electrician connect the generator to your home’s main electrical supply. Power from generators can backfeed along power lines and electrocute anyone who comes into contact with them.
  • Replenish your supplies of batteries, bottled water, non-perishable food items and firewood for future hurricanes.

Preparing for a hurricane is essential to staying safe, saving lives and saving money.You cannot prevent hurricanes, but you can minimize potential damage and injury to your home and your family by gathering supplies, preparing your home and planning for a possible storm before the hurricane season starts.


 

Attention Teachers: Bright Ideas Early Deadline is August 16
May 8, 2013

This year, North Carolina's Electric Cooperatives have allocated more than $660,000 in Bright Ideas grant funding to award educators for innovative classroom projects for the 2013-2014 school year. Teachers, principals and school counselors can apply for grants of up to $2,000. To learn more about the program and start an online application, visit www.NCBrightIdeas.com. The deadline to submit applications for the 2013-2014 school year is September 20, 2013. Applicants who submit their application by the early-bird deadline on August 16 will be entered in a drawing to win a $500 Visa gift card.

For specific questions about Bright Ideas, please call Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336.625.5177, ext. 2338 or via email at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

Electrical Safety Month
May 1, 2013

Play-it-Safe: May 2013

All day, we rely on electricity for almost everything from heating our breakfast in the morning to setting our alarm at night.  Oftentimes, we forget that electricity can potentially be hazardous.  There are many steps we can take, however, to practice proper safety when it comes to electricity.  May is National Electrical Safety Month, so here you’ll find some great tips to keep you and your loved ones safe in and around the home.

In the Home:

  • When using appliances in the bathroom, such as hair dryers or curling irons, be sure that no water is near and that the item is unplugged as soon as it is no longer being used. Also ensure the outlets in your bathroom are equipped with a ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI), which monitors electricity flowing in a circuit and trips the circuit if there’s an imbalance. 
  • Unplug all kitchen appliances when not in use, such as the toaster and coffee maker, and store them in a safe and level place to prevent them from being knocked over. 
  • When unplugging anything from an outlet, be sure to pull by the plug instead of the cord.
  • Put outlet covers into outlets not being used to prevent curious children from trying to put fingers or other objects into the outlets.
  • Replace any electrical cords that are fraying or cracking and regularly check cords for damage.
  • Never overload an electrical outlet.  Stressing the system can create a fire hazard.  When too much current is drawn from the circuit or more than one outlet is wired to a single circuit, the outlet could potentially catch fire.
  • When replacing light bulbs, check what wattage is needed on the label inside the light fixture or lamp.  Additionally, be sure that lamps are sitting away from curtains or other materials that could easily catch fire and that they are placed on stable surfaces.

Outside the Home:

  • If there is a downed power line nearby, leave the area immediately and call 911.  If others are around, let them know that they need to stay away.
  • “Call Before You Dig.” Dial 811 before starting a digging project, and workers will be sent to your home to mark utility lines in your yard. This service is free, and it has the potential to save your life.  
  • Never use electrical equipment near any wet areas, such as pools or ponds.

This National Electrical Safety Month, take the time to be cautious and check your home for potential risks.  If caution is not taken, electricity can lead to costly damages, injuries and even death.  Regularly check for electrical hazards year-round in order keep your home safe.


 

U.S. Senate Designates April 18th as 'National Lineman Appreciation Day'
April 17, 2013

The U.S. Senate passed a resolution late Tuesday night honoring linemen for their work in keeping the power on and designating April 18, 2013 as ‘National Lineman Appreciation Day.’

The bill, introduced last week by Sens. Isakson (R-GA) and Bennet (D-CO), moved quickly and was passed by unanimous consent, including support from N.C. Sens. Richard Burr (R) and Kay Hagan (D).  It serves two main purposes – it “recognizes the efforts of linemen in keeping the power on and protecting public safety” and “supports the designation of April 18, 2013 as National Lineman Appreciation Day.” North Carolina’s 26 electric cooperatives collectively employ 1,400 linemen.

“Linemen are true public servants,” said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. “They work every day in potentially hazardous conditions, oftentimes during extreme weather like hurricanes and ice storms, to keep the lights on for the rest of us.”

Today, on National Lineman Appreciation Day as designated by the U.S. Senate, Randolph Electric asks its members to thank the linemen they see, whether they’re working near your home,  or you see them at a local restaurant, church or school event. “Linemen put their lives on the line every day without ever expecting any recognition from the community,” Lambert said. “Let’s give them the recognition they deserve for their hard work and commitment to keeping the power on in our community.”


 

Randolph Electric Board Member and Employee Recognized by Statewide Organizations for Outstanding Accomplishments
April 9, 2013

Bobby D. Wright, board president for Randolph EMC, was recognized for 25 years of service to the electric cooperative. The commendable service award was presented at the North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives’ (NCAEC) annual meeting on April 3 in Raleigh. 

Mr. Wright is a native of Randolph County, where he graduated from Coleridge High School. He then earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is retired from Randolph Hospital where he served as Director of Corporate Compliance/Internal Audit. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member of Randolph Community College and Advisory Board member of First Bank’s Asheboro branch office.

Dale F. Lambert, chief executive officer of Randolph EMC, was recently elected to serve as secretary-treasurer of the board of directors for North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation (NCEMC). Lambert, who has been with Randolph EMC for 29 years, was elected to his term during the group’s annual meeting in Raleigh. The elections took place during the business session of the meeting on April 3.

Lambert began his career in the electric utility industry in 1984 as an Apprentice Lineman with Randolph Electric Membership Corporation.  He progressed through the apprenticeship program and worked as a Journeyman Lineman until 1993 when he was promoted to District Manager.  In 2000, he was promoted to CEO.

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,100 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation celebrates 75 years of service this year, from 1938-2013.     


 

SCAM ALERT: BE WARY OF FRAUDULENT CALLS
April 3, 2013

Randolph EMC is warning its members and the general public of fraudulent calls from individuals posing as bill collectors for Randolph Electric Membership Corporation.   

Cooperative members have recently reported receiving telephone calls from a person posing as a Randolph Electric employee attempting to collect payments for power bills. The caller instructs the consumer first to purchase a money order and then to call a phone number to receive the address where the payment should be sent. This is a fraud. 

"As a courtesy, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation uses an automated telephone message system to remind members of delinquent payments," said Fred Smith, vice president of member and public relations. "However, the cooperative encourages members to call or visit our local offices to make a payment." Anyone receiving suspicious collection calls should report those calls to their electric service provider directly. Randolph EMC members should call (336) 625-5177.


 

Play-it-Safe: April 2013
April 1, 2013

Pet Safety

It’s not unusual to come home and catch your cat or dog doing something naughty, like napping on the furniture or chewing on something other than a toy. In fact, some pets try to get their teeth on anything in sight. While the occasional shoe may be harmless, items like electrical cords could be extremely dangerous. You can make your home safe for your furry friends by following a few simple steps, like making sure all loose electrical cords are put away. Pets can be tempted to chew on dangling cords, presenting a choking hazard or chance for electric shock. If the cords can’t be placed out of reach, consider encasing them in PVC pipes, purchasing “pet-proof” cords or spraying the cords with a bitter-tasting pet deterrent.

Gnawed-on cords should not be your only concern for your pet’s safety. The heat from electrical appliances can create a cozy place for pets to nap. Do not allow them to sleep near the computer, television or other places where there are numerous electrical connections. Your pet could hurt itself or damage the appliance by easily knocking a cord from the outlet. Additionally, the electrical connections could overheat, potentially leading to a fire. And when your pets, instead of sleeping, are being rather playful, you need to take caution as well. Be careful to not leave bathroom appliances, such as hair dryers or space heaters, plugged in. Pets can knock these easily into water, causing electric shock or a fire. Additionally, knocking over any other household item placed near the edge of a counter, like a toaster or coffee pot, could lead to burn or injury. Unplug and put away all items not in use.

Indoor pets are not the only ones who need to be looked after. Underground electrical or cable lines are potential hazards for outdoor pets. A determined pet could potentially dig deep enough to strike a utility line. Discourage digging and keep an eye on your pets outside. If you’re unsure of your line locations, you can call 811, the designated “Call Before You Dig” phone number, to have your lines marked. When a storm is approaching, bring your pets inside. Lightning, wind and rain can be serious hazards, especially if they may bring down power lines.

It may be tough to keep an eye on your pet all of the time, but taking these steps will help ensure their safety. Creating a safe environment for your pet will help you avoid a stressful (and expensive) trip to the vet.


 

Teachers: Apply Now for Bright Ideas Education Grants!
April 1, 2013

Since 1994, educators statewide have received more than $8.5 million in Bright Ideas grant funding, and well over 1.5 million N.C. students have participated in approximately 8,300 Bright Ideas projects. North Carolina’s electric cooperatives, including Randolph Electric, are accepting applications for Bright Ideas education grants for the 2013-14 school year.

Certified teachers in Randolph, Moore and Montgomery counties are eligible to apply for grants of up to $2,000. Each year, applications are accepted from teachers in a variety of disciplines including music, art, history, reading, science, career-planning and information technology. Interested educators must have a truly creative project for their classrooms to be considered for the grant.

"Last year, Randolph Electric awarded $10,000 in Bright Ideas funding directly to local teachers," notes Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. " We are committed to the local communities we serve, and we believe there’s no better way to contribute than by investing in the education of our youth."

Grant applications will be accepted April 1 through September 20. It could pay to apply early: all teachers who submit their applications by the early-bird deadline of Aug. 16 will be entered into a drawing for a $500 gift card.

Teachers can learn about the program and apply online beginning April 1 at www.ncbrightideas.com. If teachers have any specific questions, please call Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336.625.5177, ext. 2338 or via email at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

Deadline to apply for Randolph Electric's basketball camp scholarships quickly approaching
March 11, 2013

The deadline is quickly approaching for middle-school students to apply for an all-expense paid scholarship from Randolph Electric to attend summer basketball camp at one of the state’s largest universities.  

Randolph Electric is awarding two Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships to local students this year.  One boy will be selected to attend the Roy Williams Basketball Camp June 15-19 at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and one girl will win a scholarship to attend the Kellie Harper Women’s Basketball Academy Aug. 1-4 at N.C. State University in Raleigh. Applications must be received or postmarked by March 30.

“These scholarships are a fantastic way for young athletes to experience life on a college campus and learn from mentors at their favorite NCAA athletic programs,” said Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. “We’re proud to continue the tradition of providing this opportunity for outstanding students to develop life skills that will help them excel on and off the court.”  

At camp, students will work directly with the players and coaches to learn basketball skills and about leadership and teamwork. Coach Roy Williams, a member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame and College Basketball Hall of Fame, has led the Tar Heels to two NCAA championships and two ACC tournament crowns. Coach Kellie Harper is in her fourth season with the Wolfpack women and boasts six postseason appearances during her eight years as a head coach.

To apply, students must be in the sixth, seventh or eighth grade during the 2013-2014 school year. Applicants must have permission from a parent or guardian to attend the overnight camp and must provide their own transportation to and from the camp if selected to attend.

Students who will be in sixth, seventh and eighth grade during the 2013-14 school year are eligible to apply. More information and applications, which are judged on academics, extracurricular activities and an essay, can be found at www. RandolphEMC.com or by contacting Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336.625.5177, ext. 2338 or via email at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com. Winners will be announced by May 1.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships provide a one-of-a-kind educational and athletic opportunity to our state’s youth and reflect Touchstone Energy’s core values of accountability, integrity, innovation and commitment to community. North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives will award more than 50 sports camp scholarships to students statewide this year.


 

Local Students Honored at Wolfpack Women's Basketball Game
March 5, 2013

Two local middle school students received recognition during a women’s basketball game at North Carolina State University for winning Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarships from Randolph Electric Membership Corporation. Lauren Garner of Randleman Middle School and Faith Latham of Southwestern Randolph Middle School Faith attended the Kellie Harper Women’s Basketball Academy at N.C. State last July on all-expense paid scholarships from the cooperative.

Garner, Latham and 17 other basketball camp scholarship winners from across the state reunited at Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh on Feb. 3 to watch the Wolfpack Women take on Wake Forest University.  Both young ladies were selected for the scholarship out of numerous candidates based on their outstanding applications and essays. Lauren is the daughter of Andy and Jennifer Garner. Faith is the daughter of Brian and Jessica Latham.

The scholarship winners and their guests were given tickets to attend the game and enjoyed a catered lunch. At halftime, the young women were recognized on the court, receiving a certificate of achievement from Lindsey Listrom, community relations specialist for North Carolina’s electric cooperatives. Directly following the recognitions, a check for $14,600 from Touchstone Energy was presented in support of the scholarships.

“We feel honored to have awarded Faith and Lauren scholarships to attend last summer’s basketball camp at N.C. State and to recognize them during the special halftime presentation,” said Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. “It has been a joy over the years to give many young women the opportunity to develop new skills by working with collegiate athletes and coaches.”

Randolph Electric is accepting applications for the 2013 Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarships through March 30. Statewide, these scholarships will send 26 deserving young women in sixth through eighth grades to the Kellie Harper Basketball Camp at N.C. State and 26 deserving young men to the Roy Williams Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Applicants are judged on their application, essay and extracurricular activities. To learn more about the Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarship program, visit www.ncelectriccooperatives.com.

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarship program is part of the electric cooperatives’ ongoing commitment to North Carolina communities.

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,100 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties. Randolph EMC celebrates 75 years of service this year, from 1938-2013.  


 

Play-it-Safe: Childproofing Your Home
March 4, 2013

Children are naturally inquisitive, and sometimes their curiosity can lead to trouble. You can protect your children or grandchildren from electrical hazards by making a few modifications to your home. Consider the following tips to help ensure that your loved ones are safe from potential electrical hazards.

  1. Cover unused electrical outlets with outlet plates or safety caps so that a child cannot poke his or her fingers and other objects into them. Be sure to test the outlet covers yourself, ensuring that they are not easily removable. Remember to cover every unused outlet in your home, including those behind furniture. Taking this step will reduce a child’s risk of electrical shock or electrocution.
  2. Unplug any electrical appliances not in use. Children may be tempted to play with unused appliances, like the toaster or even an iron. By unplugging the appliances, you are not only protecting your child, but you are also saving energy.
  3. Extension cords, even short ones, can pose a strangulation hazard for small children. Keep them out of a child’s reach whether they’re plugged in or not, and if you absolutely have to use one, wrap the excess around a cord shortener. Never place cords under rugs because they can overheat and create a fire hazard.
  4. When cooking on the stove, use the back burners. This will protect a child from a burn if he or she can reach the front of the stove. This also will reduce the chance of a pot or pan falling on a child, which could potentially cause a burn or major bruising.

These inexpensive steps will create a safer home for your children, whether they’re crawlers, walkers or runners. Discuss electrical safety with your children and lead by example. Most importantly, at all times, supervise your children for the best protection.


 

Spare Change Makes an Impact Through People Helping People Program
February 15, 2013

Cooperatives like Randolph Electric Membership Corporation are unique businesses. Because cooperatives are locally owned and governed by a board of directors elected by the members, there is a strong sense of community throughout the membership. "Concern for Community" is one of the seven cooperative principles and a core attribute of the Touchstone Energy cooperative.

One unique program that allows Randolph Electric members an opportunity to help others in the five counties served by Randolph EMC is through People Helping People. The primary purpose of People Helping People, also known as PHP, is to address charitable needs and provide financial assistance to members who are dealing with difficult situations. Some examples of the types of requests the board has approved include: members battling cancer; members who have been victims of a house fire; and elderly members struggling to pay for medications because of fixed incomes.

Each month, members who participate in PHP have their bills rounded up to the nearest dollar. For example, if a member’s bill is $69.54, it is rounded up to $70.00 and the extra 46 cents is contributed to Randolph Electric's PHP Fund. The average annual contribution per member is about $6.00.

"We are so grateful to those members who have been a part of this program, and are very proud of the work we’ve been able to do with that 'spare change' over the years," notes Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "PHP could increase their number of donations exponentially if more members participated. By participating in PHP, members have the power to help their neighbors in need."

REMC currently has 1,155 members donating to the PHP program—only about three percent of the 31,000 accounts. Since the program began in 2001, more than $62,000 has helped individuals, families and organizations in Randolph Electric’s communities. The average donation is just 50 cents per month, so if each and every account signed up for PHP, Randolph Electric could raise about $180,000 in just one year.                                                                                                                                                                     

"Even if we had just 25 percent participation, we could raise up to $48,000 in one year," states Lambert. "That’s almost as much money raised in the 12-year history of the program."A seven-member Board of Directors governs the money collected by PHP. Grants are reviewed and issued quarterly in January, April, July and October at the PHP Board of Directors' discretion.

A seven-member Board of Directors governs the money collected by PHP. Grants are reviewed and issued quarterly in January, April, July and October at the PHP Board of Directors' discretion.

“The program is successful because every penny is spent on enhancing the quality of life for residents from Randolph Electric's service area,” adds Lambert. “It's amazing what you can accomplish when you work together—neighbors helping neighbors with just their spare change. I encourage every member to be a part of this powerful program.”

If you are a Randolph Electric member and would like to have your electric bill rounded up each month, please call Randolph EMC at 1.800.672.8212. There is also a simple form on the website that can be completed by going to www.RandolphEMC.com and clicking on the People Helping People tab under the Community dropdown.


 

Attract More Customers with the Co-op Connections® Card
February 6, 2013

Is your business looking to attract new customers and increase business? Randolph Electric Membership Corporation has an exciting opportunity for local businesses to expand their customer base through the Co-op Connections® card program.

The Co-op Connections card program is a member discount program for Randolph Electric cooperative members and members of Touchstone Energy electric co-ops throughout the nation. This means that in addition to the 31,000 members from Randolph Electric, cooperative members throughout the nation carrying the Co-op Connections card will be able to use their card at area businesses — a great way to reach travelers.

"The Co-op Connections card program is an easy and cost-effective way for businesses to reach customers in their area, throughout the state and those traveling from other states," notes Jill Vanness, Director of Communications at Randolph Electric. "There is no out-of-pocket advertising expense with our program and there is no membership fee to businesses — it's free to enroll. Each business is responsible for the discount offer it wants to provide — we do the rest, including listing the business on our web site, www.RandolphEMC.com."

In addition to free advertising on Randolph Electric's website, new businesses who sign up will be featured in an edition of Watts Working, Randolph Electric's monthly member newsletter.

"Randolph Electric's commitment to our members goes beyond providing safe, reliable, and affordable electricity," notes Vanness. "We’re a community-minded organization always looking for ways to provide value to our members. The Co-op Connections cards provide members with a real money-saving tool and give businesses the opportunity to attract new customers. It's a win-win for everyone."

If you are a business owner and would like to participate in the Co-op Connections program, please call Randolph EMC at 336.625.5177, ext. 2338. There is also a Co-op Business Participation Form that can be completed online by going to www.RandolphEMC.com and clicking on the Co-op Connections tab under the Community dropdown menu.

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,100 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation celebrates 75 years of service this year, from 1938-2013. 


 

February Play-It-Safe: Having an Emergency Plan
February 1, 2013

When disaster strikes, it is important for your family to have a comprehensive emergency plan that includes emergency contact information and detailed escape plans. By making your plans now, you can ensure your whole family will know the best course of action for any emergency situation. Consider the following suggestions.

Emergency Contact Info:

Designated emergency contacts will allow communication to occur faster and easier among family members and emergency responders.

  • Contact Cards: Each family member should carry a small contact card with information about how to reach other family members and emergency contacts. This card should be taken everywhere – in a wallet, purse, backpack, etc. Include multiple emergency contact names and their telephone numbers. At least one number should be an out-of-state friend or relative, as it may be difficult to get in contact with those in the area, depending on the disaster.
  • ICE Contact: List one or more “ICE” (In Case of Emergency) contacts in your cell phone. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), emergency personnel will oftentimes look for a contact saved under the name “ICE.” If an accident occurs, they know the right person to contact. Tell your ICE contacts that they are programmed in your phone and inform them of any potential medical issues.

Escape Plan:

Developing and knowing your family’s escape plan is an essential step in ensuring everyone stays safe and is able to locate each other after an emergency.  Decide the details of your plan and discuss it with your family once every six months in order to be frequently reminded of the information.

  • Escape Route: Each room in your home should have two escape routes. Have a floor plan of your home marked with these routes. Be sure that each family member, especially children, understands how to leave in all emergency situations.
  • Meeting Location: Your family needs to know where to meet after fleeing from an emergency. Have a set location to meet if you are close to home, such as the next door neighbor’s mail box. Additionally, know where to meet if you are farther from home, such as the parking lot of the grocery or drug store closest to your house.

In addition to having contact information and creating an escape plan, it’s a good idea for you and your family to participate in First Aid and CPR training. The American Red Cross and American Heart Association offer training classes that will teach you these lifesaving skills. Also make sure you have a fire extinguisher on each level of your home and teach each family member how to use it. After the details of your plan are put together, make sure you and your family review it regularly. Being prepared for an emergency situation will help you and your loved ones during and after a disaster.


 

Preparing for Winter Weather and Power Outages
January 17, 2013

Despite the mild winter so far, January and February can be pretty cold months in our state, and North Carolinians are no strangers to snow and ice storms. Unfortunately, bad winter weather can sometimes lead to power outages, but with a little preparation the winter weather season can be easier to endure. Randolph Electric has several safety and preparation tips in case of inclement weather.

To prepare for an ice storm, be sure to have the proper supplies on hand. Flashlights and extra batteries are essential to your winter weather supply kit. Include a battery-powered radio in your supply kit so that you can listen to the weather forecast during an outage. Be sure to keep extra clothes and blankets in your emergency kit to stay warm if the power goes out, and remember to have the first-aid kit handy.

Many grocery and convenience stores may be closed or inaccessible during or after an ice storm, so stock up on non-perishable foods before that storm arrives. Also, make sure you have a manual can opener that can be used to open canned food during a power outage. To prevent water pipes from freezing, keep faucets turned on slightly so that water drips from the tap. Know how to shut off water valves if a pipe bursts. In case water is not available, keep plenty of bottled water in your home. Fill your gas tank before the storm, and if you take any prescription medications, be sure to have at least one week's supply available. Having all these supplies on hand before an ice storm or power outage will make the experience less stressful.

To keep your home safe, make sure all batteries in smoke alarms are working properly. Be sure that you have fire extinguishers in your home and teach each resident the proper way to use them. If you are without electricity and use a portable generator, follow the generator's safety guidelines to avoid carbon monoxide emissions, burns and possible electrocution. If you use a standby generator, make sure it has a properly installed transfer safety switch or that your power is cut off at the breaker box before you operate it. This prevents electricity from traveling back through the power lines, or what is also known as “back feed.” Back feed creates danger for anyone near power lines, particularly crews working to restore power. Be sure to let your electric utility provider know that you have a generator.

Although snow and ice storms that result in power outages can be frustrating, preparing ahead of time in order to have the right supplies and the knowledge to staywarm safely are keys to weathering a winter storm emergency. Randolph Electric members experiencing a power outage should report it the cooperative at 1.877.736.2633. In addition, members may stay up-to-date on outage progress by visiting our outage map here.


 

STUDENTS CAN APPLY FOR TOUCHSTONE ENERGY SPORTS CAMP SCHOLARSHIPS
January 8, 2013

Do you know a promising middle school student who would like to attend basketball camp at North Carolina State University or the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill? Randolph Electric Membership Corporation and North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives are offering all-expense paid scholarships for middle-school students from across the state to attend basketball camps this summer at two of North Carolina’s largest college campuses. More than 50 students across the state will attend basketball camps this summer through the Touchstone Energy Sports Camp program, a reflection of the electric cooperatives’ commitment to community.

Young women can apply to attend the Kellie Harper Wolfpack Basketball Academy Aug. 1-4 at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, and young men can apply to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp June 15-19 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Randolph Electric will award scholarships to one boy and one girl and is accepting applications through March 30.

 “Randolph Electric is thrilled to continue our tradition of awarding these scholarships to outstanding students,” said Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer at Randolph Electric. “This program provides kids with an unforgettable opportunity to work with collegiate coaches, experience life on a college campus and develop fundamental skills that will help them excel both on and off the court.”

Students who will be in sixth, seventh and eighth grade during the 2013-14 school year are eligible to apply. More information and applications, which are judged on academics, extracurricular activities and an essay, can be found here or by contacting Lauren Ingold, Public Relations Coordinator at 336.625.5177, ext. 2338 or via email at Lauren.Ingold@RandolphEMC.com.


 

January Play-it-Safe: Preparing for Ice Storms and Power Outages
January 1, 2013

January can be a pretty cold month in our state, and North Carolinians are no strangers to snow and ice storms. Unfortunately, bad winter weather can sometimes lead to power outages, but a little prep work now could make the winter weather season easier to endure.

To prepare for an ice storm, be sure to have the proper supplies handy.  Flashlights and extra batteries are essential to your winter weather supply kit.  Include a battery-powered radio in your supply kit so that you can listen to the weather forecast during an outage. Be sure to keep extra clothes and blankets in your emergency kit to stay warm if the power goes out, and remember to have a first aid kit handy. Cordless phones will not work if the power goes out, so always keep one corded phone in your home.

Many grocery and convenience stores may be closed or inaccessible after an ice storm, so stock up on non-perishable foods before the storm arrives and make sure that you have a manual can opener that can be used to open canned food during a power outage.  Keep plenty of bottled water in your home. Fill your gas tank before the storm, and if you take any prescription medications, be sure to have at least one week’s supply available. Having all of these supplies on hand before an ice storm or power outage will make the experience less stressful.

To keep your home safe, make sure that all of the batteries in your smoke alarm are working properly. Also, be sure that you have fire extinguishers in your home and teach each resident the proper way to use them. If you are without electricity and use a portable generator, follow the generator’s safety guidelines to avoid carbon monoxide emissions, burns and possible electrocution. If you have questions about generator safety, call your electric cooperative.

Although ice storms that result in power outages can be frustrating, preparing both your home and your family will help ease the frustration when storms hit.


 

Randolph Electric Employees' Generosity Helps Many During the Holiday Season and Beyond
January 1, 2013

Asheboro, N.C., - Christmas brings to most people warm fuzzy thoughts of family and friends and memories of picking up the Christmas tree with Dad and eating Mom’s homemade cookies. However, for some families in our community, Christmas can be a stressful time. To help those in need, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation invests thousands of dollars annually into the local communities it serves.

During the holiday season, employees have the opportunity to participate in two worthwhile campaigns—the United Way and Toys for Tots—to help make the lives of others in our communities a little bit brighter.  In addition, employees generously give to the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill. Throughout the year employees at Randolph Electric hold several fund raising events in order to raise money. All of the funds raised are the personal funds of the employees who hold gift basket auctions, charitable luncheons, 50/50 raffles, etc.

"Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is more than an electric service provider," states Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer. "Randolph EMC employees have long been a generous group when it comes to helping others. One of REMC’s seven cooperative principles is 'Concern for Community.'  We show concern for our members through supporting things that make our area a better place to call home."

North Carolina's Electric cooperatives have been avid supporters of the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill since making their first pledge to the organization in 1972. The center provides state-of-the-art burn treatment and rehabilitation for patients who have had severe and life-threatening burns and provides burn prevention education. Each year, the general managers from North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives hold a golf tournament to finance the sponsorship of the Burn Center and its programs.

"Two Randolph Electric employees have spent time in the Burn Center as patients within the past year and know first-hand what a wonderful asset this center is in our state," notes Lambert. "Last year, employees were compelled to make Christmas a little brighter for patients in the Burn Center. That donation project was so successful, employees decided to collect money for patients again, raising $1,626.73 that will help numerous patients and their families."

Another organization that is near and dear to Randolph Electric is the U.S Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program. This organization collects new, unwrapped toys during October, November and December each year, and distributes those toys as Christmas gifts to less fortunate children in the community. Recently, 17 bicycles were sent to Moore County and 30 were sent to Randolph County. In addition, bikes will be delivered to children in Montgomery County. Randolph Electric's goal was to raise $2,000 to purchase 40 bicycles—a goal that was ultimately exceeded.  As a result, there will be many happy children receiving bicycles on Christmas morning.

The United Way Campaign, which recently wrapped up in November, raised an outstanding $22,700 for Randolph County agencies—an increase from the 2011 campaign. The United Way operates on the philosophy that everyone deserves opportunities to have a good life: a quality education that leads to a stable job, enough income to support a family, and good health. The United Way brings agencies in the community together to help deserving people overcome their hardships.

"At Randolph Electric, we understand that every act, no matter how big or small, can have a positive impact in the community," states Lambert. "Collectively, because of the generosity of our employees, more children and families will benefit this holiday season and throughout the year."

About Randolph Electric Membership Corporation

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is a rural electric cooperative that maintains more than 4,100 miles of electric distribution lines to serve more than 31,000 customers in areas of Randolph, Moore, Montgomery, Chatham and Alamance counties. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation celebrates 75 years of service this year, from 1938-2013. 


 

December Play-It-Safe: Cooking Safety
December 3, 2012

Food is one of the best parts of the holiday season. The decadent pies, baked ham, roasted turkey, dressing and all the trimmings. Cooking is so often used as a way to gather with family and friends during the holidays, but it’s important to make sure all the cooks in your kitchen are acquainted with some kitchen safety basics before whipping up your next big meal.  

Before and After Cooking:

  • Be sure that there is a fire extinguisher easily accessible in your kitchen. Make sure everyone in your home knows where the fire extinguisher is and how to use it, and check to make sure the pressure gauge needle is in the green. If the needle points to red, replace or service your fire extinguisher.
  • Don’t let grease build on range tops, ovens or toaster ovens. Grease is a fire hazard, and remember, water should never be used to extinguish a grease fire.
  • Keep flammable items, such as paper towels, plastic bags and holiday decorations, at least three feet away from range tops.
  • Carefully read and follow the operating instructions of your kitchen appliances before using them.
  • Never plug kitchen appliances in to extension cords. This could overload the outlets and cause a fire.
  • Plug all appliances directly into outlets when you are using them, and be sure to unplug them when you’re finished. Not only is unplugging appliances safer, but it also saves energy. 

While Cooking:

  • Never use cooking appliances near the sink or any other wet areas.
  • When you are cooking on your range top, turn pot handles toward the back of the range to prevent children from reaching up and pulling down a hot pot or pan.
  • Always stay in the kitchen when you are cooking anything on the stove. If you have to leave the kitchen, turn off the stove while you are gone. 

Take extra precautions if you’re planning a more elaborate meal, like a fried turkey. Never try to use a turkey fryer indoors, even if you think it may be too cold to cook outside. These devices are serious fire hazards. Read the safety instructions that come with turkey fryers very carefully.

Follow these simple cooking safety tips and enjoy the meals you share with your family and friends this holiday season. 


 

November Play-It-Safe: Space Heaters
November 1, 2012

Space heaters, including electric models and those powered by kerosene, are a convenient source of warmth during winter months, especially if there’s a power outage, but they can be dangerous if not used properly.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC ), in a recent year, there were 10,900 residential fires and 190 deaths associated with space heaters. Space heater hazards stem not just from fires caused by contact with or close proximity to heating elements. They also include fires started by flammable fuels used in the heaters, defective wiring in the appliance and carbon monoxide poisoning caused by improper ventilation.

Stay warm and safe this winter by following these tips from the CPSC for using space heaters:

  • Keep the heater at least three feet from flammable items such as curtains, furniture, or bedspreads.            
  • Select a space heater with a guard around the heating element.
  • When buying a heater, choose one that has been tested and certified by a nationally recognized testing institution such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL).
  • Buy a heater appropriately sized for the area you want to heat.
  • Read and follow the manufacturer’s operating instructions.
  • Keep children and pets away from space heaters.
  • Never leave a space heater unattended.
  • Never go to sleep with a space heater on.
  • Never use or store flammable liquids near a space heater.
  • Do not use a heater in a bathroom– it’s a high-moisture area that could cause damage.
  • Keep heaters away from water to prevent electrocution.
  •  Do not use an extension cord with a space heater.
  • Do not use the heater to dry clothes.
  • Be sure the heater’s plug fits snugly in an outlet. The cord and plug may feel warm when operating since the unit draws so much power, but they should not feel hot. If they do, unplug the heater and have a qualified repair person check for problems.
  • Do not attempt to repair a broken heater yourself. It should be checked and repaired by a qualified appliance service center.
     

 

October Play it Safe: Home Safety
October 1, 2012

It’s a fact – according to the National Safety Council, more accidents occur off the job than on the job for people of working age, and children and the elderly are the most likely groups to experience accidents at home. Most home accidents are preventable and result from a lack of home maintenance.  Use the following checklist to spot possible safety hazards in your home.

Kitchen: Make sure all of your appliances carry an Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (UL) seal, which means the item was tested and found safe to use. Check electrical cords for fraying or cracking, step stools for splitting or cracking and throw rugs for tripping hazards like bumps and turned-up corners.

Living room: Just as you did in the kitchen, check rugs and runners, electrical cords, lamps and other lighting. Have a professional inspect the fireplace and chimney for fire hazards, and make sure all passageways are clear.

Bathroom: Make sure small appliances, like hairdryers and curling irons, are marked with a UL seal and are plugged into a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) outlet. These outlets monitor electricity flowing in a circuit and trip the circuit if an imbalance is detected, protecting people from electric shock. Check the bathtub, shower, rugs and mats for slipping hazards and make sure cabinets that contain medicines or cleaning supplies are inaccessible to children.  

Bedrooms: Examine rugs, runners, electrical and telephone cords, and make sure the area around the bed is clear of items that could cause you to trip.

Basement/garage/workshop: Make sure all power tools bear the UL mark. Check fuse and breaker boxes for possible malfunction. Inspect extension cords and cords on tools and lawn and garden supplies for fraying. Check for proper ventilation and make sure flammable liquids are stored in appropriate containers and at an acceptable temperature.

Stairs: Make sure there’s proper lighting on and around stairways. Examine handrails and steps for possible defects or weaknesses, and test stair coverings for possible tripping hazards.

If you notice a potential problem in your home, arrange for it to be fixed immediately to prevent accident or injury.


 

Co-op Warns of Bill Payment Scam
September 20, 2012

Randolph EMC is warning its members and the general public of fraudulent calls from individuals posing as bill collectors for Randolph Electric Membership Corporation.   
 
Cooperative members have recently reported receiving telephone calls from a person posing as a Randolph Electric employee attempting to collect on delinquent power bills. The person states that the bill is due now and unless paid immediately, the member's electricity will be disconnected. The caller then suggests that the consumer pay the balance due using a “Green Dot MoneyPak” card, which is a prepaid card that can be purchased from various nearby merchants. This is a fraud. 
 
The caller may give instruction to purchase the prepaid card from a local CVS Pharmacy, and then provides a phone number to call to pay via the card after the card is purchased. The phone number reported being used by the thieves begins with a 203 area code.  
 
"As a courtesy, Randolph Electric Membership Corporation does use an automated telephone message system to remind members of delinquent payments," said Fred Smith, vice president of member and public relations. "However, the cooperative encourages members to call or visit our offices to make a payment." Anyone receiving suspicious collection calls should report those calls to their electric service provider directly.
Randolph EMC members should call (336) 625-5177.


 

September Play it Safe: Power Line Safety
September 4, 2012

Fall officially begins this month (September), and the cooler temperatures typically give way to lots of home improvement projects. Some of your projects might be around the yard. Landscaping is one of the best and most affordable ways to give your home’s exterior a fresh look, but there’s one thing many people don’t consider before they start their landscaping projects – power lines. Before you grab your gardening gear, familiarize yourself with this list of power line safety tips:

  • Do not attempt to trim trees near power lines. Randolph EMC has an extensive right-of-way clearing program that ensures trees aren’t too close to power lines, but if you happen to see any that may look too close, call your electric cooperative to send out the experts.
  • If you have plans to build a tree house for your kids, be extremely cautious. Steer clear of all power lines to keep yourself and your children out of danger.
  • Remember, ladders are conductors of electricity. It’s best to carry a ladder horizontally so that it doesn’t inadvertently touch a power line, and always pay attention to where you set up the ladder.
  • Call 811 before you dig, even if it’s just to plant a tree or shrub, to identify where underground utility lines are buried. Digging around lines can cause serious injury or even death, as well as electrical outages. For more information regarding N.C. 811, please visit www.nc811.org.  
  • The Electrical Safety Foundation International (EFSI) reminds you to “Look up! Look Down! Look Out!” This motto is especially important if your field of work requires you to be in the vicinity of power lines because they kill an average of 133 workers per year.

Remember, electricity looks for the shortest, most direct path to ground. A ladder, pole or even a wet kite string touching a power line will give electricity a new, shorter path to ground. If you are holding those items, you could become a part of that path.  Those consequences could be deadly, so please exercise caution when you’re around power lines. Call your local cooperative if you have any questions or concerns about the power lines near your home.  


 

Deadline Approaching for Teachers to Apply for Bright Ideas Grants
September 4, 2012

Time is running out for teachers to apply for grants of up to $2,000 from Randolph EMC’s Bright Ideas education grant program. Educators with creative ideas for hands-on classroom projects must submit their application by September 21. Interested teachers can find the application, grant-writing tips, and more information on the Bright Ideas grant website at www.ncbrightideas.com.

“Since 1994, the Bright Ideas education grant program has provided more than $7.9 million for 7,700 projects benefitting more than 1.4 million students in North Carolina,” said Jill Vanness, Public Relations Coordinator at REMC. “We are committed to local communities, and we believe there’s no better way to contribute than by investing in the education of our youth.”

Randolph EMC and North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have allocated more than $620,000 to give to educators across the state during the 2012-2013 school year.

The grants will be awarded in November for projects in all grade levels and all disciplines, including math, science, language, art, English and history. Last year, REMC awarded more than $10,000 to fund eight different proposals.

The Bright Ideas grant applications require an outline of the proposed project, a detailed budget and a description of the benefit to students. Applicants are encouraged to highlight the innovative, creative elements of the project and to proofread carefully. 


 

ON 8/11 ‘CALL BEFORE YOU DIG’ BY DIALING 811
August 9, 2012

This Saturday is Aug. 11, or 8/11, and on this date Randolph Electric Membership Corp. is reminding members to call 811 to have underground utilities marked before beginning any outdoor projects that involve digging. This free and simple step can save lives and reduces your risk of injury, repair costs, fines and inconvenient outages.

According to the Common Ground Alliance, the leading association dedicated to protecting underground lines and the safety of people who dig near them, there were 6,197 reports of damage to underground infrastructure in North Carolina in 2011. Most of these incidents could have been prevented if diggers had called 811 to have their lines marked before picking up the shovel.

“Every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants a call to 811. We’re using August 11 to remind homeowners and contractors to call 811 before every digging job, even if it’s something simple like planting a shrub or installing a mailbox,” said Jeff McDuffie, Safety and Environmental Coordinator at Randolph EMC. “Whether you are a home gardener or professional excavator, it’s important to know what’s below ground to prevent a potentially life-threatening mistake.”

The national 811 “Call Before You Dig” phone number links residents to a local call center, which then dispatches local utility companies to mark line locations with paint or flags. This service is free, and in North Carolina, residents should call 48-72 hours before digging will take place.

Marked lines show diggers where it is – and isn’t – safe to break ground. The depth of utility lines varies, and there may be multiple lines in the same area. By calling before every project, no matter how simple, residents can help save lives, avoid costly penalties and protect infrastructure.

For more information about safe digging and the “Call Before You Dig” process, visit the NC 811 website at www.nc811.org.  


 

Teachers, Your Chance to Win $500 is Quickly Approaching!
August 9, 2012

The Bright Ideas education grant program, which awards funding to N.C. teachers for innovative classroom-based projects, is accepting applications. North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, including Randolph EMC, have allocated more than $600,000 to distribute to teachers across the state during the 2012-2013 school year. The final deadline to apply is September 21, 2012, and educators who apply by Aug. 17 will be entered into a drawing for a $500 Visa gift card.

“We’re proud to support educators whose hard work, dedication and enthusiasm impact the lives of so many young people,” said Jill Vanness, PR Coordinator at Randolph Electric. “They give so much to their students, and through the grants and the early-bird prize, we’re honored to give something back. We hope this year even more teachers will apply by August 17 and have a chance to win the $500 Visa gift card.”

Classroom teachers are eligible to apply for Bright Ideas grants of up to $2,000 for creative projects that would otherwise go unfunded. Educators can learn about the Bright Ideas program and apply online at www.ncbrightideas.com. Last year, Randolph Electric contributed $10,000 to local classrooms through Bright Ideas grants.

All teachers who apply by the Aug. 17 early-bird deadline will be entered to win the $500 Visa gift card. The winner of the gift card will be selected at random and recognized on the Bright Ideas website and Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ncbrightideas.

Since the Bright Ideas program began in 1994, the electric cooperatives have awarded more than $7.9 million in grant money to North Carolina's teachers to sponsor more than 7,700 projects benefiting more than 1.4 million students.

“Randolph EMC is committed to education and our community, and we believe there’s no better way to contribute than by partnering with teachers to create new opportunities for our youth,” Vanness said.

The Bright Ideas education grant program is part of the electric cooperatives’ ongoing commitment to North Carolina communities. North Carolina’s electric cooperatives serve more than 2.5 million people in 93 of the state’s 100 counties. 


 

MEMBER ALERT: BE WARY OF UTILITY BILL-PAYING SCAM
July 13, 2012

Randolph Electric Membership Corp. is urging members to be aware of a utility bill-paying scam affecting customers in North Carolina and nationwide. The scam falsely claims households are eligible for utility bill credits through a new federal program. No such program exists.

According to the Better Business Bureau, scammers contact consumers door-to-door and through phone calls, fliers, social media and text messages and ask for social security and bank routing numbers.   Often, President Obama’s name is mentioned.  In return, consumers are given a phony bank routing number that will supposedly pay their utility bills. In reality, there is no money, and customers believe they have paid their bills when in fact they have not.  Additionally, consumers put themselves at risk for identity theft when they give out personal information.

Members are reminded that Randolph Electric does not contact members to obtain personal identifiable information and to beware of anyone requesting this information.  When in doubt of the identity of someone claiming to represent Randolph Electric in person or over the phone, members should call 1-800-672-8212 for verification of identity and need for service. 


 

STUDENTS ATTEND BASKETBALL CAMPS ON SCHOLARSHIPS FROM RANDOLPH EMC
July 10, 2012

Three area middle-school students shot hoops and ran drills with college coaches and student-athletes during basketball camps at the University of North Carolina and N.C. State, thanks to Randolph EMC’s Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarship program.

Lauren Garner of Pleasant Garden and Faith Latham of Asheboro both won scholarships to attend the Kellie Harper Wolfpack Basketball Academy June 24-27 at N.C. State in Raleigh. Lauren is the daughter of Andy and Jennifer Garner and is a student at Randleman Middle School. Faith is the daughter of Brian and Jessica Latham and attends Southwestern Randolph Middle School.

Jared Reeder of Asheboro was awarded a scholarship to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp June 16-20 at UNC in Chapel Hill. Jared is the son of Johnny and Tina Reeder and is a student at Faith Christian School.

“Randolph EMC is pleased to give these outstanding students a unique opportunity to experience life on a college campus and to receive instruction from two of the ACC’s finest coaches,” said Jill Vanness, public relations coordinator at Randolph Electric. “These camps develop fundamental skills that will help the young athletes excel both on and off the court. We’re delighted to have them represent our co-op.”

Only 26 young ladies and 26 young men from across the state received Touchstone Energy Sports Camp scholarships this year.

The staff of the Kellie Harper Wolfpack Basketball Academy included N.C. State women’s basketball coach Kellie Harper, members of her staff and current players. The Roy Williams camp was led by two-time NCAA national champion coach Roy Williams, his staff, and current and past Tar Heel basketball players. Coaches at both camps worked closely with campers not only to develop basketball skills, but also to practice teamwork and setting goals.

“Our goals are for campers to have a great camp experience and to improve as a basketball player,” Carolina Coach Roy Williams said. “The young men who go through our camp will not only improve on the court, but they will also form memories that will last forever.”

Coach Harper of N.C. State said the Touchstone Energy scholarship winners were an impressive group of young athletes.  “They were grateful and excited about the opportunity to attend camp and demonstrated a good work ethic and competitive spirit on the court,” she added.

This is the ninth year North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives have sponsored young women to attend an N.C. State women’s basketball camp and the seventh year the cooperatives have sent young men to the Roy Williams camp.


 

July Play it Safe: Home Safety and Efficiency Tips While On Vacation
July 1, 2012

The days are long and the weather is warm; summer is at its peak, which means many of us are taking off for a much needed vacation. Whether you’re taking in North Carolina’s scenery or you’re off on a big adventure, you want to make sure your home is safe while you’re away. Before you pack up the car and hurry off to your destination, take the time to follow some simple safety precautions.

  • Unplugging all the appliances in your home can prevent fires from starting.
  • Unplug major appliances such as televisions, computers, washers and dryers. They are more susceptible to power surges than smaller appliances. A power surge causes an increase in the electrical potential energy, which can increase the current flowing to your wall outlet.
  • Make sure extension cords and power strips are unplugged.
  • Turn off the water supply.
  • Carefully identify nonessential circuit breakers in your home and turn them off to prevent fires from developing in electrical circuits.

To protect your home from burglary, remember to:

  • Ask a friend or trusted neighbor if they will keep an eye on your house while you are away.
  • Set interior lights on timers and set exterior lights on motion detectors.
  • Never leave your house key hidden outside your home.
  • If you are away for more than week, advise your alarm company or even your local police, if you live in a small town.
  • Store jewelry and valuable items in a safe-deposit box.

In addition to making your home safe, you can also make it more efficient. Adjusting temperatures and unplugging appliances can help you be more energy efficient. Either turn off your air conditioner or set it to 80-85 degrees Fahrenheit while you’re away during the summer. Some thermostats are programmable with a “hold” or “vacation” setting for this purpose. Also remember to unplug “vampire electronics” to save energy. These are electronics that use energy even when turned off. They are items with a display clock or any kind of glowing light, like cell phone chargers, microwave ovens and DVD players. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates 40 percent of the electricity used to power home electronics is consumed when those devices are in standby mode, so remember to unplug them before your vacation.

You’ll enjoy your vacation a little more knowing that your home is safe and energy efficient.


 

June Play it Safe: Hurricane Safety
June 1, 2012

It’s that time of year again, hurricane season. It may be hard to imagine at this point in the summer, but if history is any indication of what’s to come, we’re likely to face several tropical storms and hurricanes.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the greatest potential for loss of life during a hurricane comes from a storm surge, which is water pushed toward the shore by high winds. The strength from the surge can wipe out structures, and those left standing are likely to flood. Though the risk is greater at the coast, residents throughout the state need to be prepared. Hurricanes usually bring six to 12 inches of rain, meaning inland areas could flood, and high winds also have the potential to create damage inland. Another thing to consider is that hurricanes can spawn tornadoes, which are also deadly and destructive.

Hurricane season lasts from June to November, so let’s start June with a hurricane preparedness plan. Follow the tips below to make sure you stay safe this hurricane season.

Preparing for a Hurricane:

  • Have an evacuation plan for your family. Remember to include pets in your plan.
  • Make sure flashlights, battery powered lanterns and other sources of light are available and batteries are fresh.
  • Have an adequate supply of medicine and first aid items.
  • Keep at least a two-week supply of bottled water, non-perishable food items and firewood on hand.
  • Have identification and documentation on hand, including your social security card, driver’s license, birth certificate and insurance information.
  • Prepare for potential power outages by unplugging sensitive electronic appliances, such as TVs, DVD players and computers. This action will protect your appliances against power surges that can occur when power is restored.
  • Listen to weather forecasts and predictions for possible hurricanes.

During a Hurricane:

  • Get inside a building and stay away from windows.
  • Take cover in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level.
  • Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.
  • Do not be fooled if there is a lull. This could be the eye of the hurricane and winds will pick back up after the eye passes.

After a Hurricane:

  • Listen to local radio stations or NOAA Weather Radio for updated news.
  • Always treat downed power lines and poles as if they are live and dangerous – Stay Away! Inform your electric cooperative immediately.
  • Post-storm debris can hide fallen power lines. Even the ground can become energized near fallen power lines; be careful as you clean up debris, and if you think it’s possible that there’s a downed line under debris, call your electric cooperative.
  • If you are without electricity and use a portable generator, follow the generator’s safety guidelines to avoid carbon monoxide emissions, burns and possible electrocution. If you have questions about generator safety, call your electric cooperative.
  • If you cook with charcoal; make sure to do so outside to avoid build-up of carbon monoxide fumes.
  • Replenish your supplies of batteries, bottled water, non-perishable food items and firewood for future hurricanes.
  • We can’t prevent hurricanes, but we can prepare for them – start now.

 

May Play-It-Safe: National Electric Safety Month
May 15, 2012

May is National Electrical Safety Month and to recognize and celebrate this month, Randolph EMC is encouraging every family to hunt for electrical hazards in the home. We encourage you to identify potential electrical safety hazards and make necessary changes and repairs to ensure your family is safe. Use the following list to identify potential hazards:

Cords:

  • Avoid running extension cords across doorways or under carpets as a spark could start an electrical fire.
  • Electrical cords should be discarded if they are cracked or frayed and only used according to their ratings for indoor or outdoor use and power needs.
  • Three-prong plugs should NEVER be altered to fit into a two-prong extension cord or other receptacle. 
  • Never nail or staple cords.
  • Always unplug cords by pulling on the plug instead of the cord.

Outlets:

  • In homes with small children, put safety covers on unused wall outlets.
  • Avoid overloading outlets. Plug only one high-wattage appliance into each outlet at a time as not to stress the system.
  • If outlets or switches feel warm, shut off the circuit and have them checked by an electrician.
  • Listen for sparks or sizzling sounds in outlets or walls, and have them checked by an electrician.
  • If you feel a mild shock or tingle when you plug in an appliance, shut off the circuit and call an electrician.

Lights and Lamps:

  • Make sure when replacing light bulbs that the lamp’s wattage is appropriate. If you smell a burning or rubbery smell, this may be a sign that the wattage level of the light bulb is too high for the lamp.
  • Fluorescent bulbs are cooler and use less electricity, and replacing your incandescent bulbs can help prevent fires.
  • Check to be sure that light bulbs are screwed in securely, but not too tight, to prevent overheating.
  • Check to see that lamps are placed on level surfaces, away from curtains, carpet and other materials that burn easily.
  • Dim or flickering lights may indicate an issue with home wiring or a discrepancy between lamp and light bulb wattage. Check to make sure the bulb wattage is right for that lamp. If it is and lights are still flickering, contact an electrician who will inspect your home’s wiring.

Appliances:

  • Make sure all appliances have been tested by a certified product safety organization (like Underwriters Laboratories) and follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.
  • Appliances that take a lot of power to operate, like space heaters, should be plugged directly into an outlet rather than an extension cord. These appliances may draw more current than the cord can carry; it’s best to be cautious.
  • NEVER leave appliances plugged in where they may come into contact with water.
  • If an appliance falls into water, DO NOT reach in to pull it out. Turn off the power circuit then unplug the appliance.
  • Do not use electric appliances during a thunderstorm. Doing so not only increases your risk of shock, but many appliances are also susceptible to power surges, so unplug them if possible.

If you experience frequent tripped circuit breakers or blown fuses, contact a licensed electrician who can identify the problem.  

Please take the time to survey your home for potential electrical hazards as we recognize National Electrical Safety Month, and contact Randolph EMC with questions or concerns. 


 

Randolph EMC Awards Sports Camp Scholarships to Deserving Students
May 11, 2012

Congratulations to Mary “Faith” Latham of Randleman Middle School and Lauren Gardner of Southwestern Randolph Middle School, who will both attend the Kellie Harper Wolfpack Basketball Academy, and Jared Reeder of Faith Christian School, who will attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp, on scholarships from Randolph Electric Membership Corp.  Faith is the daughter of Brian and Jessica Latham of Asheboro, and Lauren is the daughter of Andy and Jennifer Garner of Pleasant Garden.  Jared is the son of Johnny and Tina Reeder of Asheboro.

Winners were selected by a panel of judges based on an application that included academic achievements, extracurricular activities, a creative essay and a short-answer question. The Kellie Harper Wolfpack Basketball Academy will be held June 24-27 in Raleigh, and the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp will be held June 16-20 in Chapel Hill.  Scholarship recipients will have the chance to stay on campus at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina and receive instruction from the schools’ coaching staff and players. 

“Randolph Electric is pleased to give these outstanding students the opportunity to experience life on a college campus and the chance to learn from winning collegiate coaches and student athletes,” said Jill Vanness, PR Coordinator for REMC. “These camps teach valuable lessons that students can apply in their lives both on and off the court.”

This is the ninth year that Touchstone Energy has awarded young women scholarships to attend an N.C. State women’s basketball camp and the seventh year that the cooperatives have sent young men to the Roy Williams camp.

The staff of the Kellie Harper Basketball Academy includes championship-winning head coach Kellie Harper, who joined the Wolfpack Women three years ago from Western Carolina University, and current N.C. State women’s basketball players. The Roy Williams camp is led by two-time NCAA national championship coach Roy Williams and current and past Tar Heel basketball players. Staff at both camps will work closely with each camper to develop fundamental basketball skills and motivate students to set and achieve goals. 

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarship program is part of the electric cooperatives’ ongoing commitment to local communities in North Carolina. 


 

April Play-It-Safe: Power tool safety for spring projects
April 16, 2012

We’re getting close to the time of year when weekend projects requiring power tools become popular. These tools, which often include drills, saws, pressure washers, nail guns and sanders, can be hazardous if handled improperly.

The chief hazards of electric-powered tools are burns and shock that can lead to injuries and even heart failure. A shock could also cause a power tool user to fall from an elevated surface, like a ladder or roof. Consider the following best practices when tackling your home improvement jobs using power tools.

  • To prevent shock, tools must have a double insulated cord and a three pronged plug.
  • Always operate power tools within their design limitations and use them in the way intended.
  • Know the right tools for the job and keep the tools in proper operating condition.
  • Read the safety manual to understand safety precautions and potential hazards.
  • If you do plan to use power tools while on a ladder, be sure not to use the top step/rung of that ladder.
  • Wear the right personal protective equipment, including gloves, safety glasses and safety footwear to prevent injury.
  • Long hair should be tied back and avoid wearing loose clothing.
  • When not in use, tools should be stored in a dry, safe place away from children.
  • Electric tools should not be used in damp or wet locations, including in the rain or near puddles.
  • Work areas should be well-lit and clean. Dust particles can ignite with a spark and it is necessary to keep the work space clean to prevent cords from tangling.
  • Proper lighting is necessary and something to take note of considering many home improvement projects take place in dark garages or basements.
  • Check tools before each use for exposed wires, lose plugs and nicked cords.

Power tools are most often misused as a result of overconfidence or negligence. Be alert and heed these safety warnings to make sure power tools help you get the job done safely and efficiently.


 

March Play-It-Safe: Tornado Safety
March 7, 2012

It’s hard to believe it has been almost a year since devastating tornadoes ripped through our state, killing more than 20 people, injuring hundreds of others and damaging homes and businesses. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, tornado occurrences peak in the southeast between March and May, so it’s important that we all know what to look for and how to prepare as we enter this season of uncertainty.

Tornadoes, known as nature’s most dangerous storms, can be more than a mile wide and create winds that reach up to 300 miles per hour. Tornadoes can develop quickly in the right conditions, which is one of the reasons these storms are so dangerous. Look for these signs that a tornado may form.  

Signs a tornado may be coming:

  • Tornadoes typically occur in the late afternoon and evening.
  • Often there is calm before the storm, and it is not uncommon for a tornado to take place under sunny skies, however, they generally occur at the trailing edge of a thunderstorm.
  • Watch for a dark, often greenish sky, large hail and a loud roar that sounds similar to a freight train.
  • A tornado WATCH means that a tornado is possible, and to stay tuned as storm conditions develop.
  • A tornado WARNING means that a tornado has been spotted or indicated on weather radar and you should take shelter immediately.

Things to do before a storm:

  • Develop a plan and determine the safest place to take shelter in your home. The safest rooms are those in the middle of a house, with no windows, such as a lower-level bathroom or basement.
  • Prior to peak tornado season, make sure to trim any tree limbs and branches that could be a hazard to your home. Do not trim trees close to overhead power lines; call your electric cooperative instead.
  • Remove any debris from around your lawn. Be sure all lawn tools and yard ornaments are put away and secure patio furniture; checking for these hazards may help keep you and your home safe in the event of a tornado.

Knowing what to look for and preparing for a tornado can help keep your family safe this spring.


 

Power Restored Following Progress Energy Transmission Line Outage
February 20, 2012

A damaged transmission line caused nearly 2,425 Randolph Electric members to be without power overnight in areas of near Franklinville, the Gray’s Chapel community the Randleman area just south of Pleasant Garden.

At approximately 9:15 p.m. on Sunday, February 19, a large tree fell over a Progress Energy transmission line, breaking the two-pole transmission structure. The damaged line feeds Randolph EMC’s Grays Chapel substation, and shut down power to all members served by that station. Materials had to be brought in to repair the line, and due to the type of construction, the time to complete the repair was much longer that of a conventional distribution line. Power was restored at approximately 9:00 a.m. February 20.


 

February Play-It-Safe: Making Your Home Safe for Inside Play
February 8, 2012

It may be a little too cold for your children to play outside right now, but restless children who have been cooped up all winter are probably desperate to burn off some energy. It’s up to the adults in your household to create a safe place for kids to play inside. Children are fascinated by electronics and the outlets used to power electronic devices, so it’s important to include electric safety in your indoor play rules. Share these guidelines with your children so they can play safely indoors.

  • If you have young children in the home, make sure every outlet is covered with a safety cap. Safety caps are available at many discount stores, drug stores and even some grocery stores .These caps should be placed in unused outlets so young children can’t stick their fingers or other objects into outlets. 
  • Be sure that older children know to NEVER put anything other than an electric plug into an electric socket. Outlets should be covered until children are mature enough to understand that fingers, pencils, toys and other objects must be kept away.  
  • Do not allow children to overload outlets or power strips. Plugging too many electrical devices, like several video gaming systems, into one outlet can cause it to overload and catch on fire. It’s important to check outlets and power strips in your children’s rooms to make sure they’re not overloaded.
  • Always unplug electrical appliances and toys when not in use.
  • Teach your children to always remove electrical devices from outlets by grasping the plug and not the cord. Tugging or pulling can damage the cords and create a safety hazard.
  • Check electrical cords for any damage and wear.
  • Arrange cords so that children don’t walk on them or pull them.
  • Electrical cords are not toys and children should not play with them or allow pets to play with them.
  • Never allow children to insert any metal objects into an appliance without first checking to make sure that the appliance is unplugged, for example using a knife to remove food from a toaster.
  • Do not use any electrical appliance or device when wet, with wet hands or while standing in water. Ensure that children dry their bodies and hands after taking a bath before touching any electrical items, including hair dryers and light switches. Never take plug-in electrical items, such as a radio, into the bathroom.
  • Make sure children keep drinks away from electrical items in case they spill.

By following these safety tips, you can be sure your kids have a fun and safe time playing inside for the rest of the winter.


 

Apply Now for Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships
January 16, 2012

Randolph Electric Membership Corp. and North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives are offering all-expense paid scholarships for middle school students from across the state to attend basketball camps this summer at two of North Carolina’s largest college campuses.

Young women can apply to attend the Kellie Harper Wolfpack Basketball Academy at N.C. State University in Raleigh, and young men can apply to attend the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Randolph EMC will award scholarships to one boy and one girl and is accepting applications through March 30.

“Randolph Electric is thrilled to continue our tradition of awarding these scholarships to outstanding students,” said Jill Vanness, Public Relations Coordinator at Randolph EMC. “This program provides kids with an unforgettable opportunity to work with collegiate coaches, experience life on a college campus and develop fundamental skills that will help them excel both on and off the court.”

Students entering sixth, seventh and eighth grade are eligible to apply. More information and applications, which are judged on academics, extracurricular activities and an essay, can be found here or by contacting Jill Vanness at (800) 672-8212.  

More than 50 students across the state will attend basketball camps this summer through the Touchstone Energy Sports Camp program, a reflection of the electric cooperatives’ commitment to community.


 

January Play-It-Safe: Electrical Fires—Where they occur, how they start, how to prevent them.
January 4, 2012

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, there are approximately 28,600 home electrical fires each year. Winter months are the most dangerous for electrical fires because indoor activities require additional lighting, heating and appliance use.

Most electrical fires are the result of faulty outlets and old electrical systems, but cords, plugs, receptacles, switches, light fixtures and bulbs are also likely causes. The bedroom is the leading area for electrical fire origin.

Routinely follow these safety precautions in order to avoid an electrical fire in your home:

  • Check electrical appliances and wiring often.
  • Replace all worn, old or damaged cords immediately.
  • Replace any electrical tool or appliance if it causes even small electrical shocks, overheats, shorts out or gives off smoke or sparks. This is a sign that the tool is faulty and could cause a fire.
  • Keep electrical appliances away from wet floors and wet counters.
  • Make sure to only buy electrical products evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratory (UL).
  • Keep clothes, curtains and any other potentially combustible items and liquids at least three feet from all heaters.
  • Never force a three-prong plug into a two-slot outlet or extension cord.
  • Do not allow children to play with or around electrical appliances like space heaters, irons or hair dryers.
  • Use electrical extension cords wisely being careful not to overload sockets or cords.
  • Never run electrical cords under rugs.

If an electrical fire does occur in your home, remember to NEVER use water to put it out. By the time you see smoke coming out of the outlet, a fire has most likely already begun and is spreading within the walls and up to the attic. Always have a class ABC fire extinguisher, which uses dry chemicals to put out fires, ready for this type of situation.

If it is safe to do so, turn off all power in the house, exit and call 911 be sure to tell them it is an electrical fire. After having an electrical fire, call a certified electrician to determine what needs to be replaced or what you can do to avoid another occurrence. 


 

Play It Safe: What’s Safe in Outdoor Decorating
December 12, 2011

For many of us, putting up holiday decorations can sometimes turn into a friendly competition among neighbors. Determined to have the best looking house in the neighborhood, some people are willing to hang miles of icicle lights and plug in scores of inflatable snowmen just to out-do the neighbors. However festive, these embellishments also add electrical strain to your home, and safety must be a priority when decorating. Follow these tips to ensure a safe, joyful holiday season:

  • Only use outdoor lights that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory, which indicates conformance with safety standards. Be sure to check to see if the lights you’re using are certified for outdoor use.
  • Fasten outdoor lights securely to trees, house walls, or other firm supports to protect the lights from wind damage. 
  • Use only insulated staples to hold strings in place, not nails or tracks when hanging lights. 
  • Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires or loose connections, and throw out damaged sets. 
  • Always replace burned-out bulbs promptly with the same wattage bulbs.
  • Use no more than three standard-size sets of lights per single extension cord. 
  • Stay away from power or feeder lines leading from utility poles into older homes.
  • Outdoor electric lights and decorations should be plugged into circuits protected by ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs).  Portable outdoor GFCIs can be purchased where electrical supplies are sold and installed permanently to household circuits by a qualified electrician. 
  • Use caution when removing outdoor holiday lights.  Never pull or tug on lights- they could unravel and inadvertently wrap around power lines. 

There are also a few tips to remember when purchasing a Christmas tree. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, Christmas trees account for 250 fires annually, resulting in 14 deaths, 26 injuries and millions of dollars in property damage, so take heed.

  • Keep your tree well hydrated. Dry branches can ignite when they come in contact with lights.
  • Never use electric decorations on an aluminum tree.
  • If your tree is artificial, make sure it is fire retardant.
  • Do not place your tree close to a heat source, such as a heater, vent or fireplace.
  • When disposing of your tree, never put the branches in the fireplace. Rather, take your tree to a recycling facility or have it discarded by a community pick-up service
  • Turn off all holiday lights when you go to bed or leave the house.  The lights could short out and start a fire. 

Plan accordingly this season to guarantee a merry holiday!


 

RANDOLPH EMC AWARDS $10,000 TO LOCAL TEACHERS FOR “BRIGHT IDEAS”
December 1, 2011

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation awarded $10,000 in grants to eight teachers across Randolph County as part of its Bright Ideas grant program. Sponsored by North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, Bright Ideas honors deserving educators who put great thought and effort into designing innovative, creative projects that enhance their students’ learning experience.

A panel of retired educators representing Asheboro City, Randolph, Moore and Montgomery County Schools carefully reviewed and discussed each application before deciding on these final awards:

Mrs. Tammy Applegate, Asheboro High School, $1300
“Roller Coaster Calculus” uses motion detectors, toys and models—such as roller coasters, remote control vehicles, and Hot Wheels cars—that interface with their graphing calculators, and simulation software to conduct experiments on velocity and acceleration. Students will experience a real-life context for many of the calculus concepts we studied in calculus classes.

Mr. Barry Richard Barber, South Asheboro Middle School, $1,600
“Building Robots to Bring Out the Best in Every Student” will provide students the opportunity to design, program, and build their own robots. Through authentic, project-based activities requiring problem solving and collaboration, this robotics program will enhance education in technology, mathematics, and science school-wide.

Mrs. Lori Columbia, Eastern Randolph High School, $435
“Hip Hop Write” motivates students to write and develop critical thinking skills by incorporating music with writing. Students will be introduced to new musical styles, critique lyrics and brainstorm their meanings, and then compose pieces of their own.

Ms. Ella Kern, Donna L. Loflin Elementary School, $1,100
“A Year in North Carolina” uses reading, writing, researching, science, social studies, math, and technology to make a calendar about the yearlong social studies focus of North Carolina.

Mrs. Jennifer Matthews, Archdale Elementary School, $1,200
“Integrating Literacy and Social Studies Through Inquiry Circles” integrates Language Arts and Social Studies by using a variety of resources to investigate answers to common questions. Students then make creative presentations and present to their peers.

Mr. Jeff Perry, Southwestern Randolph High School, $2,000
“Forestry Resources Maximized” will allow students in the Carpentry and Natural Resources Departments to have a more complete understanding of how to use timber to their advantageby purchasing and using a portable sawmill. Students will work with different species of trees and use the lumber processed at the school to learn more about their characteristics and make better choices when building different structures, furniture and projects.

Ms. Anne Shirk, Randleman High School, $765
“Musical Webcams” will allow the high school choral teachers of Randolph County Schools to use webcams to collaborate with each other and each school's students by sharing musicianship skills and experiences. Classes across the county will be able to rehearse music between schools and experience classes with composers and guest artists from across the nation.

Mr. Thomas Soja, Southwestern Randolph High School, $1,600
“Recycling Made Easy: A Campus Recycling Center”will utilize students’ carpentry skills to build a center for a campus-wide recycling program. This project promotes interaction between all students, with a special emphasis on providing meaningful service hours and peer mentoring for mentally and physically challengedstudents.

Any certified K-12 North Carolina teacher may apply for a grant of up to $2,000 to be used for creative projects in their classroom. The Bright Ideas program began 17 years ago to help teachers who were funding classroom-based projects out of their own pockets and has since provided funding for more than 6,500 projects. In total, North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives collectively contributed nearly $600,000 to fund more than 550 Bright Ideas projects this year.

“Randolph Electric is committed to bettering the communities we serve, and we believe there is no better way than through educating our youth,” said Dale Lambert, Randolph EMC’s CEO.. “Bright Ideas is the only grant program in our state exclusively for North Carolina teachers, and we are proud to support this worthy cause.”

Since the program’s inception in 1994, REMC has contributed more than $170,000, and North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives have awarded more than $7.1 million to N.C. teachers across the state. The Bright Ideas program has reached more than 1.2 million North Carolina students in all subjects including math, reading, science and technology, music and the arts.

To find out more information about the Bright Ideas grant program, click here or visit www.NCBrightIdeas.com. Become a fan of “Bright Ideas Education” on Facebook to receive regularly updated news about the program. 


 

REMC Celebrates the Cooperative Difference
October 6, 2011

Every October since 1930, not-for-profit cooperatives of all stripes have celebrated Cooperative Month. During this time, it makes sense to highlight the qualities that make electric cooperatives different from other types of utilities and businesses.

For starters, electric co-ops are owned by those they serve. That’s why those who receive electric service from us are called members, not customers. Without members, there would be no Randolph EMC.

Members maintain democratic control of our co-op, which means they elect fellow members to represent them on the board of directors/trustees every June at our annual meeting. As a bonus, co-op members receive special benefits through programs like our free energy audits and agricultural and commercial lighting efficiency rebates. We also return margins to our members each year in the form of capital credits.

One principle that sets us apart from other businesses is our concern for community. As a cooperative, we have a special responsibility to support the areas in which our members live and work. From sponsoring a local school’s baseball team to supporting new jobs and industry through our economic development efforts, we stand as a driving force in our community

Of course, co-ops span all industries, including credit unions, dairy operations, health care, housing, and much more. There are more than 29,000 co-ops across the nation. And not all are small or rural. Just look at nationally known co-ops like Sunkist, Ace Hardware, and Land O’ Lakes.

Overall, co-ops are more accessible than other types of businesses. We give our members a voice, and we are local—living and working alongside those we serve.

That’s the cooperative difference.


 

Play-It-Safe: Electrical Fire Prevention
October 1, 2011

October is National Fire Prevention Month, and because electrical fires claim the lives of hundreds of people in the United States each year and injure thousands of others, now is the perfect time to become reacquainted with electrical fire safety basics. According to the United States Fire Administration, more than 28,000 residential electrical fires are reported in the United States each year, and sadly, most could have been prevented if safety measures had been taken. In recognition of National Fire Prevention Month, follow these simple tips and precautions to help prevent electrical fires in your home.

  • Only plug three-prong appliances into three-slot outlets. Never remove the grounding pin or force a three-prong plug into a two-slot outlet or extension cord.
  • Replace any appliance or tool immediately if it causes even a small electric shock, overheats, shorts out or gives off sparks or smoke.
  • Do not use a light bulb with wattage that is too high for the fixture. If you are using a compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb, look at the package to determine wattage equivalents.
  • Never plug more than two home appliances into an outlet at one time.
  • If your light switches are hot to the touch or your lights are flickering, immediately turn them off and have a professional replace them.
  • Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately.
  • Keep all electrical appliances away from wet floors or counters. Be especially aware of this precaution when using appliances in the kitchen or bathroom.
  • Place any electric heaters away from all clothes, furniture and curtains.
  • When a fuse blows or a breaker is tripped, find out what is causing the overload before replacing or resetting it. Correct the problem, but if you cannot easily find the source or you feel uneasy, call an electrician to correct the problem for you.

In recognition of National Fire Prevention Month, inspect the electrical cords, outlets and appliances in your home to help prevent residential electrical fires. 


 

Randolph EMC Crews Head to N.C. Coast to Help Restore Power
August 27, 2011

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation sent line crews to sister cooperative Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corp. in Jacksonville, N.C., to help restore power in the wake of Hurricane Irene. Randolph EMC's service territory has been minimally affected by the storm, with a few scattered outages across its five-county service area. As of 2:45 p.m., Jones-Onslow EMC reported more than 32,000 members without power—approximately half of its total membership.

REMC sent a total of 31 crew members to help, including REMC’s staff line technicians and mechanic, as well as contract line technicians from Lee Electric and Pike Electric. Sufficient crews will remain at home to respond to power outages if needed.

“Our crews are eager to help our friends at the coast,” said Dennis Mabe, Randolph EMC’s Vice President of Operations. “We continue to monitor this storm, and expect our crews to arrive in Jacksonville as Irene moves out of the area. As soon as it’s safe to proceed, crews will evaluate the damage and begin repairs.”

Deploying crews is part of a mutual aid agreement shared between the nation’s nearly 1,000 electric cooperatives to help one another in times of emergency, like natural disasters. Electric cooperatives across the country use the same line system engineering standards, which means line crews from any part of the country can quickly help other cooperatives in restoration efforts.


 

Randolph EMC keeping an eye on Hurricane Irene
August 26, 2011

Randolph Electric Membership Corporation is keeping a close eye on the path of Hurricane Irene as it moves up the Atlantic coast.

Though current models predict that the impact to central North Carolina will be minimal, Randolph EMC has a storm plan in place and line technician crews stand ready to respond should power outages occur as a result of heavy rain and gusty winds.

Randolph EMC personnel have also begun to prepare to assist sister cooperatives in the coastal areas of the state to aid restorations efforts there. “The cooperative way is to pitch in wherever we’re needed in a storm situation,” said Dennis Mabe, vice president of operations. “Cooperatives across the state work together to make plans days in advance so that when the time comes, everyone knows their assignment and no time is wasted getting help where it is needed. So, once we’re confident that our members have been taken care of and we’re in the clear to send a group of our crew members to other areas, our trucks begin moving out.”

Sufficient crews also remain at home to respond to power outages if needed.

Here at home, Randolph EMC encourages members to have the cooperative’s outage reporting number on-hand to report outages as soon as possible. That number is 1-877-REMC-OFF (1-877-736-2633). The co-op’s online outage map is also available at http://outages.randolphemc.comaround the clock. The map is linked to REMC’s internal mapping system and is updated every two minutes to keep members updated on crews’ progress in restoring power.

As a safety reminder, individuals encountering downed power lines should stay well away from affected areas. Never approach power lines that are hanging low or are on the ground; they could still be energized. The cooperative encourages residents to prepare an emergency kit that includes non-perishable food and bottled water, a flashlight, radio, batteries and any other items necessary for enduring a power outage.


 

Randolph EMC Celebrates 73rd Year
June 17, 2011

Asheboro, N.C.—An estimated 1,200 people attended Randolph EMC’s 73rd Annual Meeting Friday, June 17, 2010. Members enjoyed free homemade icecream, several energy-related informational booths, live gospel music by The Callicutt Family, and a children’s program by the N.C. Zoo and the chance to win more than 100 door prizes. The event also included Line Superintendent Mike Hodges’ account of REMC crews’ recent trip to Alabama to help restore power to cooperative members affected by the tornadoes there.

During the business meeting, three incumbent directors were re-elected: Bob Wright to District 2; Jerry Bowman, District 4; and Tammie Phillips, District 7. Director Steve Harris stepped down from his position as President after serving nine years in that role. “I thank the membership for the opportunity to be President of this board, and I look forward to continuing to serve as the Director representing District 8,” Harris said.

During the business meeting, Mr. Harris reported that the cooperative is returning $2 million in a general capital credit retirement, and an estimated $275,000 to members’ estates. “Capital credits are a core benefit to cooperative members, as it represents their ownership in the company,” Harris said.

Dale Lambert, Chief Executive Officer of Randolph EMC, reported that the cooperative brought in revenues of $62.6 million and had expenses of $60.5 million, ending the year with a $2.1 million net margin. The largest expense was electricity generation, accounting for over 60 percent of all of the co-op’s expenses for 2010. The cooperative has total assets and liabilities of $136.4 million.

Lambert addressed the cooperative’s plans to deliver more value-added services to members. Randolph EMC has completed installing “smart meters” to more than 30 percent of the membership as part of its Automated Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Smart meters allow two-way communication between the member and the cooperative and bring such benefits as remote meter readings, prepaid metering opportunities, more detailed outage information and enhanced monitoring of the electrical system.

Lambert also proudly reported that the cooperative’s New Hope Substation is complete, energized and operational. This station improves reliability and adds capacity to the western area of Randolph County.

The cooperative continues its commitment to energy efficiency and conservation, and is on track to meet the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards established in Senate Bill 3 in 2007. Lambert urged members work with the co-op on conservation efforts and encouraged them to visit TogetherWeSave.com, a website that shows how making small changes in energy habits can add up to real savings.

The cooperative’s staff also remains focused on safety, celebrating its 13th Certificate of Excellence Safety Accreditation from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. In addition, Lambert applauded Lineman Danny Lee’s first-place finish at the N.C. Statewide Pole Top Rescue competition.

Lambert closed with a report that the Environmental Protection Agency is continuing to regulate the electric utility industry under the Clean Air Act—legislation that was never intended for that purpose. “It is still important to communicate with your elected officials to encourage them to keep electric bills affordable while meeting environmental policy objectives,” he said.

At the conclusion of the business meeting, the Board of Directors elected new officers for the year. They are Bob Wright, President; Jerry Bowman, Vice President; Sue Spencer, Secretary/Treasurer; and Tammie Phillips, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer.

Upon leaving the event, each registered member received a utility bucket and a package of 18 CFLs as a gift for attending the annual meeting.


 

REMC TO AWARD $10,000 FOR CLASSROOM-BASED PROJECTS
March 25, 2011

Creative Teachers Can Apply April 1 For 2011-12 Bright Ideas Education Grants 
 
North Carolina’s electric cooperatives, including Randolph EMC, have earmarked more than $590,000 for classroom-based projects through the Bright Ideas education grant program for the 2011-2012 school year. Teachers can learn about the program and apply online beginning April 1 at www.ncbrightideas.com. 
The electric cooperatives’ Bright Ideas program is the only one of its kind in our state exclusively for K-12 teachers. Grants of up to $2,000 are available through Randolph EMC. The deadline for teachers to submit an application is September 23.   Teachers who submit their application by the early-bird deadline on August 15 will be entered in a drawing for a $500 Visa gift card.
 
“Randolph EMC is proud of the difference this program is making to the quality of education in our state," said Jill Vanness, Public Relations Coordinator for Randolph EMC. Last year, the state’s electric cooperatives collectively distributed more than $594,000 in Bright Ideas grants, and surpassed $7.3 million dollars in contributions since the program began 18 school years ago. 
 
Bright Ideas grants help finance innovative classroom projects that would otherwise not receive funding. The program has sponsored a wide variety of hands-on projects in all disciplines.  
Since its inception in 1994, the Bright Ideas grant program has sponsored more than 7,000 projects benefiting more than 1.3 million students. “We understand the importance of creativity in the classroom and we’re encouraging innovation through this program,” said Vanness.
      
The primary elements of the online application process include an explanation of the project and its creative elements, as well as its potential benefits to students.  A sample application and contact information for program coordinators are available on the Bright Ideas website. The program also has a Facebook page, which features notable projects and regularly updated information.


 

Apply Now for Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships
February 21, 2011

North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, including Randolph EMC, are providing all-expense paid scholarships for 27 deserving young women to attend the Kellie Harper Basketball Camp at NC State in Raleigh and 27 young men to attend the Roy Williams Basketball Camp at UNC in Chapel Hill this summer.  Both camps will be held during the month of June and will work closely with each camper to develop fundamental skills that will help the young athletes excel both on and off the court.

Rising sixth through eighth graders are eligible to apply through March 31, 2010.  Applicants will be judged on their academics, extra-curricular activities and accompanying essay. 

The Touchstone Energy Sports Camps program provides a unique educational and athletic opportunity for outstanding students across our state and is yet another way the cooperatives are demonstrating their commitment to North Carolina communities.

Download your application now!